2018-2019 Academic Catalog 
    
    Mar 24, 2019  
2018-2019 Academic Catalog

Courses


 
  
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    EN 264 - Environmental and Social Epidemiology


    Epidemiology investigates the distribution and determinants of health at the population level, in contrast to medicine, which traditionally has focused on health in individuals. Social epidemiology tries to understand how social and economic factors influence population health and contribute to disparities in health. This course will cover basic principles of epidemiology and social epidemiology and the use of epidemiologic methods to study the associations between environmental exposures and the risk of disease. We will also investigate how social and economic factors influence environmental exposures, particularly among susceptible populations. Lectures, discussions, problem solving.

  
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    EN 269 - Sustainable Communities


    Communities around the world are taking a lead role responding to sustainability challenges, including climate change, by pursuing various forms of sustainable communities which seek to re-imagine the relationship between human societies, the built environment, and ecological systems. This course will explore the different approaches to sustainable community development and it will interrogate the assumptions, philosophies, and economic models that underlie these different approaches. It will investigate the many dimensions of sustainability that are valued in lived communities, including ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, responsibility, and social well-being, and it will consider the extent to which different approaches to sustainable communities support these goals. Case studies will be drawn from around the world.

  
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    EN 277 - Sustainable Consumption and Production


    The increasingly unsustainable pressure on the Earth’s natural systems calls for radical changes in the way people in the industrialized and in the rapidly growing economies satisfy their appetite for goods and services. Some believe that innovation in technologies is our great hope, while others emphasize the need to change the consumption patterns of individuals and societies. Both necessitate changes in institutions, values, and social arrangements. This advanced seminar examines the role that changes in technology, institutions and culture might play in bringing about the necessary change toward more environmentally sustainable development. Four types of innovation are discussed: in the production process, in product design, in function delivery by way of products and services, and in a larger sociotechnical system. The course draws on theories of technological innovation, consumer behavior and institutionalism as well as empirical case studies from the United States, Europe and some developing countries. The course considers the key drivers of change, such as government policy, market forces, cultural norms, activities of mission-oriented organizations, social movements and others.

  
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    EN 282 - U.S. Environmental Pollution Policy


    In this course, we study approaches to regulating pollutants in air, water, and land in the United States. The course will provide an in depth review of the process of environmental policymaking in the U.S., while exploring the pros and cons of different regulatory approaches. The course has four primary objectives: (1) examining the trades-offs inherent in crafting pollution policy; (2) the role of science in the policy making process; (3) the different approaches used to motivate various societal players to act in ways that minimize the release of environmental pollutants; and (4) business perspectives on environmental policy and risks. The course draws on a wide range of academic and professional materials, including economic theories, political science, environmental law and policy, and technical/scientific information.

     

    The Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act are two of the major environmental statues in the United States, which we will explore as part of the course. Each law has spurned a wide range of regulations and standards, which have been shaped and modified by subsequent legal decisions, new scientific data, and changing administrations. We study these laws by studying their key provisions and the resulting regulations, and by analyzing their implementation in specific cases. The following key questions are addressed: At what point in the pollution generation process to intervene? What type of intervention to take? What societal issues to consider in the regulatory decision? At what level of government to regulate? How to apportion the responsibilities among different levels of government? What scientific data to use and what analytical methods to apply? How to motivate polluters to comply with the regulations?

     

    In addition to these major media-based statutes, we will also focus on emerging environmental issues, including the environmental risks and debate surrounding the expanded role of “fracking” in oil and natural gas production in the United States, and the regulation of greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act. Because of the advanced and ever-changing nature of the material for this course the readings are taken from many sources: excerpts from books, published articles, the web, the Federal Register, internal reports from research organizations, and so on. In addition, students perform independent research on specific topics, especially recent relevant case studies.

     

    The course has a seminar format. Students have regular writing assignments, give presentations in class, and are expected to actively participate in class discussions. Attendance is mandatory except for well justified personal hardship cases. In addition to the weekly seminars, the course will include a seminar on environmental databases, data manipulation, and data presentation. The seminar will include instruction on some of the advanced functions and features of Microsoft Excel.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall or Spring

  
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    EN 290 - Capstone Research


    A required course for senior environmental science and policy majors, this seminar offers an opportunity to integrate the strands of the environmental science and policy major. The product will be a completed research project and a poster presentation. A research proposal for an honors project or a master’s thesis is optional but strongly encouraged. Specific topics for investigation are chosen largely on the basis of student interest from a broad array including global environment threats, energy and other resource issues, community brownfields, and technological risk assessment and management. Unlike a regular course, student presentations constitute a major portion of class meetings, with the instructor as a facilitator of discussion and as a general resource for the group.

    Prerequisites: Students must be seniors or second-semester juniors and must have completed a substantial fraction of their major requirements.

  
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    EN 297 - Honors


    Honors in environmental science requires directed research for at least two semesters under the supervision of a faculty member of the program, a thesis, and an oral presentation.

    May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the ES Director.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: fall & spring

  
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    EN 298 - Internships


    Academic experience taking place in the field with an opportunity to earn credit.

  
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    EN 299 - Directed Study


    Students construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  
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    ENG 020 - Introduction to Literary Analysis


    This seminar-sized course introduces students to three or more types of literary form (fiction, poetry, and one other genre). Students will learn the most important tools of literary analysis, including the uses of metaphoric language, sound effects, rhetorical devices and will practice writing effective essays that analyze elements of literary form. Meets the Verbal Expression (VE)requirement.

     

     

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ENG 101 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    This course will introduce the basics of creative writing, including poetry, creative prose, and the short story. We’ll start with poetry and shorter prose pieces, then move toward longer writing assignments. Beginning assignments will focus on the basics of creative writing, including word choice, invention, rhythm, and sound. Later assignments will explore characterization, voice, dialogue, setting, and conflict. This course will include weekly outside reading assignments, and you should plan to write frequently and copiously. Classes will be taught in seminar fashion and will include a combination of short lectures, writing exercises, class discussion, and workshops where you will discuss each other’s writing. By the end of the course you will have compiled a final portfolio of your own creative work. For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course counts as one of the introductory courses. 

    VE Placement

     

    Prerequisites: VE Placement

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Each Semester

  
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    ENG 105 - News Writing


    Covers the basics of news writing, from reporting an event to writing an obituary. Students learn how to collect information, conduct interviews and organize writing into crisp news copy. Class work includes weekly deadline writing assignments. Homework: weekly writing exercises based on textbook examples and field assignments, as well as readings from texts and daily newspapers.

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 106 - Creative Writing: Fiction


    For students who are inspired to write short or long stories. Equal emphasis on writing well and creating boldly, with focus on giving and receiving criticism in the workshop format. Students will be encouraged to “find their voices” by experimenting with style, genre and structure. For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course counts as one of the introductory courses. 

    Prerequisites: VE Placement

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 107 - Creative Writing: Poetry


    Creative Writing: Poetry/Workshop A significant part of the class will be dedicated to exploring each student’s poetry through a constructive workshop approach. Each week, students will respond to prompts that focus on specific source material, poetic devices, or both. The course encourages participants to be open to a wide range of poetic styles and influences as they embark on writing assignments and critiques, and to look closely at the work of established poets. As the semester progresses, students will experiment with revision and create a portfolio of poems representing their best work. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Genre (C-1) requirement. For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course counts as one of the introductory courses.

     

    Prerequisites: VE Placement

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 110 - Lyric Architectures: Reading Poetry


    This course will help you to become a better close reader of modern poetry and introduce you to a selection of British poets. We will read poetry and essays by major poets of the British canon, including Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Christina Rossetti, Yeats, Eliot, Larkin, and Heaney. We will also read selections from recent poets who experiment with poetic form and interrogate conventional understandings of British national identity, including work by Wole Soyinka, Louise Bennett, Eavan Boland, and Thom Gunn. Our central aims will be to enhance your comprehension of poetic form and to investigate connections between poetry, politics, and culture. Fulfills the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. Strongly recommended for English majors in the first or second year; seniors by permission. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Genre (C-1) requirement.

    formerly titled ENGLISH POETRY I

    Prerequisites: VE Placement

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered annually

  
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    ENG 111 - Creative Writing: Nonfiction


    True stories, well told. Creative nonfiction is like jazz-a mix of flavors, ideas, techniques. Some are new; others as old as writing itself. We are story, essay, journal article, research paper, reported journalism, memoir, even poem; personal or not, or all of the above. In this course, we will read examples and tell our own stories as well as other people’s. We’ll operate in part as a studio devoted to writing; we’ll discuss what we read and explore craft and technique. We will workshop our own work. Students submit a final publication-ready portfolio. For Creative Writing minors, this course counts as one of the introductory courses.

    Prerequisites: VE Placement

    Course Designation/Attribute: N/A

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 113 - Literature of Baseball


    ENG 113 Literature of Baseball/First-Year Seminar

    Baseball has often been cited as “America’s game,” in the sense that it is thoroughly interwoven into the history of American culture. Many writers, particularly in the 20th century, have seen in the game fertile ground for describing their interpretations of the American experience. It is a game which offers tremendous variety within rigidly set boundaries. In short, baseball is a metaphor to which Americans return repeatedly to express their sense of identity. It is this general theme that this course will explore: why is baseball so attractive to American writers of all types, and how do they use the game and its players as the basis for suggesting who we are? Fulfills the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement.  Offered periodically.

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 115 - Speculative Fiction


    Speculative fiction (more popularly known as science fiction) entertains the “what if” and presents alternative conceptions of history, society, and identity. Committed to exploring the possibilities and limitations of the alternative and the different, these works interrogate established boundaries of identities and provide critical perspectives on prevailing beliefs and ideologies. The course moves chronologically through works that fall loosely under the speculative fiction subgenres of fantasy/horror, alternative histories, future dystopias, and political allegories. We will also devote some attention to formal analysis, specifically the ways in which speculative fiction narratives experiment with and break from traditional literary conventions to offer new ways of perceiving, constructing, and deconstructing our social realities. Authors include Mary Shelley, H. P. Lovecraft, H.G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Philip K. Dick, Ursula Le Guin, Octavia E. Butler, William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Kim Stanley Robinson, and Ted Chiang. Fulfills the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. You must be placed at the Verbal Expression level to be admitted into this seminar.

    Prerequisites: VE Placement Required

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 116 - The Secret Lives of Books


     

    Sometimes you can judge a book by its cover, not to mention judging by its ink and paper, by its typeface and layout, even by damage or by marks left by earlier readers. Books tell stories with the words printed inside them, of course, but they also tell stories just by being physical objects. In this course, students will learn to become book sleuths. Readings and seminar discussions on the history and theory of the book will be enhanced by a series of hands-on workshops at Special Collections as well as off-campus field trips. While the full scope of the class extends from the earliest periods of the written word through current-day digital advances, emphasis will be given to specific historical periods (the development of moveable type, the proliferation of print in the early hand-press period, mechanization during the Industrial Revolution, changing paradigms of electronic textuality today) in order to understand the interplay of technology, culture, and society over time.

    Course Designation/Attribute: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every 3 years or so.

  
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    ENG 118 - Webs and Labyrinths: Introduction to Narrative Theory


    This course is an introduction to stories and storytelling.  What is narrative?  We will consider the various forms, genres, and structures of narrative, including such aspects as point-of-view, chronology, plot, unreliable narrators, and the relationship of narrative to history and memory.  In the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to the ways in which storytelling has changed in the era of globalization. We now live in a world of webs, labyrinths, and networks–metaphors that suggest the breaking down of borders and increased connectivity across cultures, nations, markets, and geographies. This course will introduce you to writers and theorists seeking a language fitting to an age of constant newness.  We will consider different sorts of fictions associated with the era of global culture: reflexive modes of storytelling that break down boundaries between artists and audiences; sweeping historical novels that weave together the real and the “magical”; and multimedia narratives that combine texts and technology.  Our focus will be on the dialogues that take place among genres and disciplines, and on narrative experiments that make it increasingly difficult to draw clear distinctions between fiction, poetry, drama, and visual culture.  Students enrolled in this course should enjoy working with texts that at times can be abstract and philosophical.

     

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: N/A

  
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    ENG 120 - Introduction to Shakespeare


    The purpose of this course is to (re-)introduce you to the rich, complex, and potentially radical politics of Shakespearean expression. To that end, we will thoroughly examine seven of Shakespeare’s plays (along with a range of film interpretations) and attend specifically to how they explore the many ethically resonant issues-injustice, political corruption, gender, sexuality, class, race, etc.-that continue to challenge our world. By engaging in this process, it is my hope that we will begin or continue our development as sophisticated interpreters of the past and the present and, in turn, ethically oriented shapers of the future. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-1) requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: TBA

  
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    ENG 122 - Terror of the Gothic


    In this course, we will explore our delight in terror through the world of nineteenth-century Gothic fiction, novels like Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, a world of pain and destruction, fear and anxiety. In tracing the recurrent themes of sin, family dynamics, politics, and nature within Gothic fiction, we will examine both the relationship of this fiction to the dominant culture of the nineteenth century, as well as to social and political revolution. Following current literary scholarship, we will pose questions about representations of violence; the significance of fantasy and fear; and the role of gender, race, class and sexuality in this body of work. Throughout the course, we will examine the legacy of this fiction in our modern cultural obsession with horror through film. This course satisfies the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. First-Year Intensive.

    Prerequisites: VE Placement Required

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 123 - Voicing the Verse: Poetry in Performance


    This course engages the creative process of rehearsal and performance as a means to understand technical aspects of poetry such as meter and other aural effects. We will also explore historical traditions of oral poetry from the ancient Greeks to the present (but please note that there will be only minor coverage of contemporary slam traditions). Rehearsal and recitation will occur mostly in class and during studio time, but working in teams, students will also prepare and record an audiobook of poetry by the end of the semester. Students must register for a Studio. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Genre (C-1) requirement.

     

     

    Course Designation/Attribute: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Most years in spring semester.

  
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    ENG 124 - Devil in the House


    The domestic sphere, especially in the nineteenth century, is associated with the bourgeoisie, banality, and conservative family values. In reality, the domestic encompassed economic insecurity, social transgression, sexual violence and queered ideas of marriage. Focusing on the nineteenth-century novel, this course links the domestic with divorce, violence, and poverty, as well as feminism. In tracing the heterogeneity of households and the multiple meanings of the domestic, we will also consider the contemporary household. Fulfills the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. Offered periodically.
     

     

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 125 - Medical Ethics in Science Fiction


    This First Year Intensive Seminar focuses on the ethical, legal, and social implications of medical science as interrogated through science fiction texts. Students will engage in a variety of writing assignments designed to think about not only literary genre (science fiction) but also larger social/ethical issues, exploring questions such as: How does medical science as depicted in science fiction shape how we understand our humanity? Our personhood? And how does this culturally and historically contingent institution shape relationships, individual-to-individual, individual-to-group, and group-to-group? 

    This course counts towards the Genre requirement in the English Major.

    Course Designation/Attribute: VP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall

  
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    ENG 131 - Border Crossings: Narratives of Travel, Exile, and Immigration


    The course examines contemporary narratives of travel, exile, and immigration from around the world. Close readings of texts will ground our interrogation of borderlands, diaspora, exile, code-switching, identity, race, class and gender.The course will be run as a seminar with student presentations, group work, and research projects as key components. Fulfills the Verbal Expression requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE Placement Required

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Occasionally

  
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    ENG 133 - Women Writers I


    Examines how women writers before 1900 address, confront, avoid, subvert and question traditional notions of gender, culture, domesticity, history, ethnicity and sexuality. Close attention is paid to textual reading, the historical and intellectual context of works, and different critical approaches to women’s writing. Authors include Behn, Burney, Austen, Sedgwick, Chopin, Gilman, Foster and Wilson. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Historical Sequence (B-1) requirement. Meets the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement.

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year, alternating with ENG 134

  
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    ENG 134 - Survey of Women Writers II


    Examines developments in British and American prose fiction by women in the 20th century. Authors include Cather, Woolf, Lessing, Rhys, Silko, Morrison, Winterson, Cisneros and Kincaid. Close attention is paid to textual reading and defining, revising and challenging traditional definitions and expectations of women’s writing on various levels: thematic, linguistic and formal. The course also addresses current critical approaches to women’s writing. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Historical Sequence (B-2) requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year, alternating with ENG 133

  
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    ENG 135 - The Short Story


    This course involves intensive reading of stories that exemplify a variety of fictional methods and affords the student some knowledge of the history of this literary type. Attention will be paid to the international scope of the short story, particularly in the 20th century. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Genre (C-2) requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 140 - Major British Writers I


    Turn and face the strange! This class takes us on a magical mystery tour of (mostly) English literature from the early Middle Ages to the latter half of the seventeenth century. We will read works by both canonical and lesser-known writers while exploring related social and cultural themes within their historical contexts, including courtly influence on the arts, the development of English drama, emerging colonialism, and the seventeenth-century emphasis on writing about the self. Clark University is committed to inspiring students to affect ethical change in our world, so we will also investigate how these texts engage with eternally resonant issues like war and peace, interpersonal violence, gender, sexuality, race, class, etc. Featured authors include the Beowulf and Gawain poets, Marie de France, Chaucer, Margery Kempe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton.

    For undergraduate English majors, this course partially satisfies EITHER the Historical Sequence (B-1; pre-1850 portion) OR Period (D-1; at the 100-level) but does not double count.

    Prerequisites: IDND 018 or VE Placement

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year

  
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    ENG 141 - Major British Writers II


    The sequence ENG 140 - ENG 141 takes an historical approach to British literature from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the 20th century. This course focuses on British literature from the eighteenth to the late nineteenth century through authors such as Jonathan Swift, William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Charlotte Brontë, Oscar Wilde and Joseph Conrad. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Historical Sequence (B-2) requirement. Meets the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement.

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year.

  
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    ENG 143 - Terrible Beauty: The Art of Tragedy


    This course examines the historical evolution of tragedy and its central place in Western literary expression. Beginning with the three classical exemplars, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, we trace tragedy through Roman closet drama (Seneca), Renaissance masters (Shakespeare) and European interpretations (Racine, Schiller), to both modern experimental tragedy (Miller) and modern attempts to revive the classical model (Eliot). For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies either the the Genre (C-2) or Period (D-1) requirement but does not double count.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ENG 145 - Fabulae: The Genre of Romance


    This course examines the tradition of the romance genre, from classical antiquity to the present. Texts read range from early Greek “novels” and Medieval metrical romances, through the Gothic tale and Romantic poetry to contemporary forms such as science fiction, fantasy and horror. Along the way, students will be able to see how the general conservative elements of a given literary form are transmuted to accommodate a number of specific contexts. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Genre (C-2) requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 146 - The Epic


    Explores the tradition of epic poetry, in both its primary and secondary forms, as well as examining the extension of the epic vision to its later manifestations in lyric verse and prose fiction. The course begins with the Epic of Gilgamesh, and extends to the twentieth century. Authors and texts covered include Gilgamesh, Homer, Beowulf, Milton, Blake, Shelley, Melville and Eliot.
    For undergraduate English Majors, this course fulfills the C-2 requirement.

     

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 148 - Memoirs from the Borderlands


    The course focuses on the genre of memoir as a vehicle for public offering of personal stories. By examining different types of memoir dealing with stories of multicultural or marginalized identities, emphasis is given to how memories are shaped into narratives about life in social and cultural borderlands. Lecture/discussion.  For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Genre (C-2) requirement.  Listed with Race and Ethnic Relations (RER).

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year

  
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    ENG 150 - Introduction to Medieval Literature


    Introduces western European medieval literature, touching on classical roots and contemporary counterparts in the process. Topics covered may include literary forms (epic, romance), social concerns (religion, the role of women, politics) and myth. Works read and discussed are selected from Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Norman, Celtic and Middle English authors, and range from Beowulf and Marie de France’s Lais to the Gawain-poet and Dante. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Period (D-1) requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 164 - The Gothic


    The Gothic, one of the most popular genres in nineteenth-century Britain, explores the dominant culture through its dark underside. In detailing both individual and national transgressions, this literature responds to significant cultural movements of the time, such as the advent of psychology and the explosion of revolutionary politics. This course traces Gothic literature from its origins in representations of fear and pain to its culmination in portrayals of alienation and monstrosity. To fully understand the genre, we will read a wide range of authors including Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker and Robert Louis Stevenson, as well as critical literature on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century theories of psychology and politics. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Genre (BC2) requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year.

  
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    ENG 165 - American Ethnic Writers


    This course surveys literature written by African American, Asian American, Native American, and Latinx American writers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  We will read from a range of genres, including novels, short stories, poetry, memoir, and graphic storytelling.  In the course, we will discuss works that speak to confronting and navigating the following themes: war, racism, migration, alienation, sexuality, community, and resistance.  This course partially fulfills the Historical Sequence requirement (B-2) for the English major.

    Prerequisites: VE Prerequisite

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year

  
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    ENG 169 - Seeing New Englandly


    Studies the development of American literature, how it separated itself from European traditions by localizing its context within its own demographic.  Authors read my include Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Frost, Howthornes, Whitman, and Thoreau.

    Prerequisites: VE Placement Required
     

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall

  
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    ENG 180 - Major American Writers I


    The sequence ENG 180-ENG 181  takes an historical approach to American literature from Puritanism to the present. This course concentrates on early American literature, circa 1620-1860, by authors such as Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Douglass, Dickinson, Whitman, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, and others. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Historical Sequence (B-1) requirement. Meets the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. This course also fulfills the Diversity and Inclusion requirement.

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE, DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year

  
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    ENG 181 - Major American Writers II


    The sequence ENG   -ENG 181  takes an historical approach to American literature from Puritanism to the present. This course traces the evolution of American literature and its major aesthetic movements from circa 1860 to the present. Writers and poets include Melville, Twain, Crane, Wharton, James, Williams, Eliot, Hughes, Cather, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Pynchon, and Morrison. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Historical Sequence (B-2) requirement. Meets the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement.

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year

  
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    ENG 182 - African American Literature I


    Addresses major periods and principal authors of the African American canon. Readings may cover a historical span that could range from the 18th century to the present or could represent focused concern with select authors and/or a given literary movement. Students are expected to gain a historically as well as a culturally contextual appreciation of the literature produced by writers of African descent in the Americas. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Historical Sequence (B-1) requirement. Meets the Historical Perspective (HP).

    Course Designation/Attribute: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 183 - African American Literature II


    Explores the aesthetic modes configuring the evolution of African American literature in the 20th and 21st centuries, especially the novel. Focus is on the experimental and innovative sensibilities regulating the evolving canon of postmodern writing produced by Americans of African descent. Authors studied may include David Anthony Durham, Percival Everett, Minister Faust, Edward P. Jones, Gayl Jones, Jamaica Kincaid, Toni Morrison, John Ridley, Fran Ross, Carl Hancock Rux, Olympia Vernon, Colson Whitehead and Kevin Young. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Historical Sequence (B-2) requirement. Meets the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement.

    Course Designation/Attribute: VE

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 199 - The Text, the World, and the Critic: Narrative and Form


    ‘The Text, the World, and the Critic’ is a core course for the English major.  Participants in the course will develop strategies for close reading and analysis of a range of literary genres, including poetry, drama, and prose narratives such as novels and short stories.  We will also be attentive to connections between literature and narratives of history, geography, and the social world.  As we explore methods for reading literary texts, we will not lose sight of the role of pleasure in engaging with narrative forms.  What compels us to read?  What draws us to particular texts?  How does literature as a social institution enable us to better understand the connections between our imaginations and the world around us?  How does literature help to shape and define the worlds in which we live?  In developing the tools necessary to become sophisticated and thoughtful literary critics, the course will also show that the powerful techniques employed in reading literature can also be applied to `extraliterary’ textual forms, such as popular culture, political speech, and the discourses that shape everyday life.  Readings may include a play by Shakespeare, poetry by Keats, Wordsworth, Adrienne Rich, and Derek Walcott, a graphic novel by Alison Bechdel, and novels by Zadie Smith, Teju Cole, Colson Whitehead, Ian McEwan, and Arundhati Roy.  This course is strongly recommended for students who have recently declared a major in English, or who are planning to declare an English major in their sophomore year.  In 2017-18, the course will be required for all English majors and fulfills the A requirement.

    Special Topic for Spring 2017: Narrative, Form, and Politics: This course will explore various forms, genres, structures, and strategies of narrative, primarily in novels, but also extending to poetry, plays, graphic novels, and films.  Issues we will consider include point-of-view, chronology, plot, autobiography, irony, nested stories, narrative and history, and narrative and memory.  We will be curious throughout as to the capacity of literature to envision new modes of being in the world and to shape the world the world around us.

    Prerequisites: No coursework, but a decision to delcare a major in English.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every spring semester.

  
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    ENG 201 - Peer Learning Assistant


    Peer Learning Assistants (PLAs) are undergraduate students who are selected by a faculty member to facilitate teaching and learning activities. These activities may include: providing feedback on drafts of writing assignments, leading small group discussions, working with individual students who are having difficulty, and facilitating group project work (in or out of class & online).
    Registration is by instructor permission only

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall/Spring

  
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    ENG 203 - Creative Writing Genre Study: Hybrid Selves - Using Hybrid Forms to Explore Race, Gender, and Sexuality


    In this class we will examine and produce works of literary art that challenge our definition of genre. Whatever you want to call them-and we will, of course, wade into the mires of nomenclature-slipstream or hybrid literary art forms such as flash fiction, prose poems, lyric essays, hyperfictions, etc. have become increasingly visible in contemporary literature. Writers such as Claudia Rankine, Maggie Nelson, Layli Long Soldier and others are using these forms to explore questions of race, gender, sexuality and all the other ways we exist, and are defined, as people in the world. Our goal will be to approach these texts as scholars and artists for the purposes of understanding how challenging traditional formal expectations allows us new ways to discover, celebrate, express, explode, chart (and many other verbs!!) personal, communal, and national identities in our work.

    So, simply, what are hybrid forms? To start, and we can reconsider this as we explore, a hybrid work is a literary object that merges elements of different traditional forms-as in the prose-poem or the lyric essay or the academic memoir. And, of course, even weirder mashups are possible: collage texts, graphic novels, hyperfictions, and bafflers such as Anne Carson’s “fictional essays in poetry.” As Clarkies know, labels can pretty flimsy definitions and obviously designating such pieces ‘hybrid’ implies reductive/conventional definitions of genre. In this class we will investigate what conspicuous awareness or transgression of these formal boundaries exposes and allows.

    For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course fulfills the advanced requirement.

    Course Designation/Attribute: DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 204 - Writing for Modern Media


    For students who want to learn how to write articles they might actually sell, as well as delve into the world of modern media, including ‘zines, social media, blogs, and other essential tools and avenues for today’s writers. We will emphasize such vital skills as: analyzing the markets, coming up with fresh ideas, slanting to the audience, researching and interviewing, creating killer leads, composing query and cover letters, writing to length, meeting deadlines, professional social media skills and, especially, writing well. 

    Course Designation/Attribute: POP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 205 - Culture and the News


    Examines the social, cultural, political and economic factors that go into constructing what we call news in North America and specifically in the United States. This course also examines the “nature” of news media, their purpose, content and uses in late- 20th-century and early-21st-century America. Some of the major questions this course attempts to address include: How is news content determined and by whom and for what reasons? Who “owns” the news? How do news agencies and institutions “cover” local, national and international events and from what perspectives and why?

    For English minors, this course counts as a 200-level English course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 206 - Writing the Novel I


    For students who are trying to write book-length fiction, or who want to discover if they have the temperament and talent for it. Our aims within our workshop format are to get you writing, to keep you going, and to help you improve. All successful novels contain common, essential elements, which we will isolate. In addition to the usual suspects - character, theme, setting, plot-we will also examine elements such as suspense, story question, voice, point of view, scene, sequel, genre and others. We will also talk a bit about avenues to publication; types of publication (paper, Web, eBook, audio); acquiring an agent; and marketing your work. Students will complete a polished draft of the first 10,000 words of their novel. For Creative Writing Minors, this course counts as one of the advanced courses.

     

     

    Prerequisites: ENG 101, 106, 107, 111, or permission of the Instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 207 - Creative Writing: Advanced Fiction


    This advanced creative writing workshop in fiction offers students who are serious about writing fiction a supportive seminar setting to present their work for discussion and suggestions, to learn how to critique the writings of others, and to participate in discussions about the art and craft of writing fiction, including the use of characterization, setting, plot, conflict, and dialogue. For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course counts as one of the advanced courses.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101, 106, 107, 111, or permission of the Instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 209 - Writing the Novel II


    For students who want or are in the midst of writing a novel. Much like Writing the Novel I, our workshop format will explore such elements of long fiction as scene, character, plot, setting, subplot, etc. We’ll address writing styles and techniques, giving and receiving criticism, revising, and genre. Students will complete a polished draft of the first 10,000 words of their novel or, having taken Writing the Novel, 10,000 polished words of their and the professor’s choice. Writing the Novel I is not a prerequisite for the course, but for those students continuing from WTNI, we will work on fine tuning such elements as secondary characters, humor, mid-novel blahs, stretching the writing muscles, and getting published. For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course fulfills the advanced requirement.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101, 106, 107, 111, or permission of the Instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 211 - Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry


    ENG 211 Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry/Workshop: While a significant part of the class will be dedicated to exploring each student’s poetry through a constructive workshop approach, this course also requires in-depth critical feedback in every class and a series of annotations that address elements of craft.  We will look closely at the work of established poets, especially contemporary poets, and trace lineages and influences from particular poets’ work back to their roots.  In addition to assigned readings and exercises, a new poem a week is expected. As the semester progresses, students will experiment with revision and create a portfolio of poems representing their best work. This course requires completion of ENG 107 or permission of the instructor. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Genre (C-1) requirement. For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course fulfills the advanced requirement.

    Prerequisites: ENG 107 or permission of the Instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 214 - Creative Writing Capstone: Multi-genre Advanced Workshop


    In this advanced creative writing course, students will spend the semester working on individual writing projects in their chosen genre (poetry, fiction, and/or creative nonfiction, which includes memoir). Central to this class is the workshop, where students will present their ongoing writing for supportive feedback and discussion. Outside readings in literature and on craft will be assigned which correlate with student work. Recommended as the final course for students pursuing a minor in Creative Writing. Prerequisites include any introductory creative writing course and one other creative writing course, or permission of the instructor. For undergraduate Creative Writing minors, this course fulfills the Capstone requirement.

    Prerequisites: One introductory course (ENG 101, 106, 107, or 111) and one advanced course (ENG 206, 207, 209, or 211) or permission of the Instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 215 - Language and Culture in the United States


    Using a cultural perspective on language, this course addresses varieties of language use and their consequences in the United States. Topics include - demographics and immigration in sociolinguistic perspective; the systematic nature of language; language and culture patterns of different groups (Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino/a Americans, Iranian Americans); bilingualism and multilingualism in the United States; and the policy implications of language diversity.  For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Theory (E) requirement.  Listed with RER and COMM.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year

  
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    ENG 222 - Black Political Literary Movements of the 20th Century


    This course examines the politics and culture of major black literary and cultural movements of the 20th Century across the Diaspora, including (but not limited to) The Harlem Renaissance (or the New Negro Movement), Senghor and Cesaire’s Negritude Movement, Guillen’s Afrocriollo movement, and the Black Arts Movement. We will explore the legal, political, and cultural zeitgeist that gave way to these periods of highly politicized and radicalized literary and cultural production and the legacies of these movements for the contemporary era in the 21st century. For undergraduate English Majors and minors, this course satisfies the D-3 requirement.

    Course Designation/Attribute: N/A

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 225 - American Print Culture 1700-1900


    The years from 1700 to 1900 witnessed a transformation of print culture from the handpress period to an age of mechanical reproduction. The rapidly increasing availability of inexpensive print technologies had a tremendous impact on habits of publishing, of writing, and of reading itself. In this course, students will examine how the material contexts of print culture in early America affected and were affected by notions of authorship, readership, gender, genre, and popular and elite taste. Some sessions will be conducted at the American Antiquarian Society where students will be able to examine archival material in hands-on workshops. For the final research paper, students will be encouraged to use resources from the AAS, from Goddard Library Special Collections, and/or from the many new digital humanities archives now available online.  For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-2) requirement.



     

    Course Designation/Attribute: POP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Most years

  
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    ENG 227 - The Book in the Early Modern World


    The rise of the printed book in early modern Europe is associated with corresponding renewal and innovation in science, letters, and theology. As with so many widely accepted narratives, however, the story turns out to be messier, more complicated, and ultimately more interesting than broadly understood. In this seminar, hands-on laboratory assignments with rare material from the Jonas Clark collection at Goddard Library’s Archives and Special Collections supplement readings as students explore major topics in early modern book history-the emergence of the codex; moveable type and the persistence of manuscript; the technology of the early hand press; design issues from typography to bindings; communications circuits; histories of reading; bibliographic identity. Toward the end of the semester, the class holds a Rare Book Open House with exhibits and demonstrations of material from Archives and Special Collections. No previous knowledge is required or expected, but an interest in books as material and technological objects is strongly recommended. The course may be of particular interest to students in English; History; Cultural Studies and Communication; Media, Culture and the Arts; Comparative Literature; Ancient Civilization; Studio Art; and Art History. For English majors, this course may satisfy the D1 or E requirements but cannot double count. For English minors, this course satisfies the theory requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Most years

  
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    ENG 232 - Modernist Literature


    Examines the literature written primarily between the two World Wars, focusing on aspects of that literature that deal with the autonomy of the individual and his or her existence in the face of overwhelming social forces, history, and culture; literature’s aesthetic relationship to the other arts; and the “mythic method” as technique of the period. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the D-3 requirement. For English minors, this course counts as a 200-level English course.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: N/A

  
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    ENG 238 - Contemporary Latino/a Literature


    This course examines the contributions to American literature made by Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans and other Latino/Latina writers in the United States over the last thirty years.  Through a variety of Latino/Latina writing, we will explore the ways in which these writers represent community, class, race, gender, culture, nation, and ethnicity in their works.  We will also examine the ways in which Latinas(os) have manufactured identities within mainstream society, as well as the developement of cultural hybrids and other forms of cultural registers.  Representative works of various genres will be read and analyzed within a cultural context;  the testimonio, the auto ethnographic essay, the narrative (novel and short story), drama, poetry and film.  Authors include Gloria Anzaldua, Sandra Cisneros, Luis Valdez, Cristina Garcia, Julia Alvarez, Junot Diaz, Achy Obejas and Piri Thomas.  For English majors, this course satisfies the D-3 requirement. For English minors, this course counts as a 200-level English course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 243 - Literary Theory & Global Culture


    This seminar examines the myriad aesthetic choices available to fiction writers in the era commonly referred to as “globalization.” How do we imagine the relationship between literature and contemporary politics? In what ways do the increasingly permeable borders of the modern world reshape our understanding of literature? How does literature help us to understand the new idioms of selfhood that emerge in a global age? Is there a particular literary form that is best suited to represent - and critique - the era in which we live? This course will survey the vocabularies that humanities scholars have invoked to address the rapidly shifting institutions and cultural frameworks of global capitalism, including, for example, questions pertaining to literary aesthetics and form and debates regarding realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will touch upon questions of relativism and discourses of human rights; ways of conceptualizing global belonging and global citizenship; and the aesthetics of realism and postmodernism as responses to world-historical events of the late twentieth century and beyond. Students can expect to encounter philosophically rich texts from key thinkers in postcolonial and cross-cultural studies. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the theory (E) requirement.

    Prerequisites: One upper-level course in the humanities.  ENG 248 Contemporary Literary Theory recommended.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year.

  
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    ENG 245 - Mythopoetics


    This course examines modes and qualities of literary expression where we will find that narratives and poetry convey different expectations, which are also embedded in a variety of worldviews. Frequently, however, authors will attempt to craft these expectations and worldviews to accommodate nontraditional visions. Toward this end, we will read works by authors who strive to come to grips with their own experiences of the world. For English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Theory (E) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year

  
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    ENG 248 - Contemporary Literary Theory


    Investigates and develops several theoretical approaches to literature in the late-20th and 21st century, attempting to provide glimpses into the range of theoretical issues and concerns. We look particularly at identity formation in contemporary literary, political, economic, cultural and social arenas. May also look at a literary text in relation to theory. General areas of study are selected from among the following: textual criticism, new criticism, psychoanalysis/reader response, structuralism, poststructuralism, feminism, postcolonialism, postmodernism, gay and lesbian theory and Cultural Studies. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course satisfies the Theory or Criticism (E) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

    Placement Guidelines
    N/A

  
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    ENG 250 - Medieval Literature


    Explores medieval literary culture of Western Europe by means of literary theoretical and classical texts. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Period (D-1)requirement. Themes vary each year, and the seminar can be taken more than once for credit, as long as each time a different theme is chosen.

    SPRING 2019 - Medieval Women Writers
    This course examines a range of female-authored texts from the Middle Ages, ranging in date from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries. Given the limitations on women’s writing, this body of work is remarkable for its size and scope: we will read letters written by Anglo-Saxon nuns, romances, fables, love poetry, love letters, medical texts, mystical and visionary literature, theology, autobiography, utopian literature, political theory, and correspondence between aristocratic women. Throughout these readings  we will confront the question of what “women’s writing” means.  Can we find essential characteristics of female-authored texts? Can we locate a female literary ethos in particular genres, or are we encountering a fortuitous selection of “typical” medieval literature? Much of our time will be spent on how women viewed themselves and their own bodies. Female bodies were constrained by a complicated network of social, economic, and political forces, which  intersected with activities that we think of as historical (e.g., the nature of women’s work), literary (e.g., the function and style of women’s poetry), and religious (the tradition of female mysticism). Texts will include works by Hildegard of Bingen, Heloïse, Marie de France, female troubadours, Cristina Mirabilis,  Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, the Pastons, Christine de Pizan, and Joan of Arc.

     

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Periodically

  
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    ENG 251 - Chaucer


    Guides the student through The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Parlement of Fowls, some Canterbury Tales and/or Troilus and Criseyde. All texts are taught in Middle English. No prior knowledge of Middle English required. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Period (D-1)requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Periodically

  
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    ENG 252 - Cultural Discourses of Advertising


    Focuses on the ways in which discourse elements in advertising draw upon, circulate, and create new cultural codes. Patterns and codes of “discourse imaging” that structure ads are explored in the context of verbal and visual properties, intertextualities, and ideology. Through the perspective of Critical Discourse Analysis, emphasis is given to the relationship of advertising discourse to larger cultural discourses and their consequences. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Theory or Criticism (E) requirement.

    Prerequisites: CSAC 101  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ENG 253 - Advanced Studies in Shakespeare


    “The remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he really is very good, in spite of all the people who say he is very good.”
     - Robert Graves, quoted in The Observer, 1964

    In this seminar we will explore a variety of Shakespeare’s plays within the contexts of family relationships and the popular analogical framing of the home as “a little commonwealth,” representing the state in miniature. Through our readings and classroom discussions, we will examine early modern ideas (and attendant anxieties) about gender roles, domestic violence, obedience, treason, and a putatively natural order in which the husband and father functioned as the sovereign of his household realm, with wife, children, and servants as subjects. In doing so, we will employ various critical perspectives (historical, feminist, post-colonial) to put these centuries old texts in conversation with the concerns and issues of our own historical moment.

    For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-1) requirement. Prerequisites: ENG 120 or TA 214 or permission of the Instructor.
     

     

    Prerequisites: ENG 120  or TA 214  or permission of the Instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: TBA

  
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    ENG 255 - Studies in the Renaissance


    Intended to build on English 120 and/or 140, this course will draw on established and emerging theoretical insights to trace a specific thematic concern-such as, “New World” colonization or Renaissance anti-intellectualism-through a representative sampling of Renaissance texts from about 1500-1700. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-1) requirement. For English minors, this course counts as a 200-level English course.

    Spring 2019 - Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama
    In this seminar we will examine a selection of plays by Shakespeare’s contemporaries within the historical and cultural context of early modern England. The playhouses of this period were vibrant spaces of entertainment, education, and controversy, where hot topics and concerns of the day were explored through the action onstage. As many as 3,000 people - from nearly every social class - would pack the Globe, the Curtain, and other Bankside theatres on a daily basis; the plays we will read this semester contain as broad a range of characters as did their original audiences. By engaging with a variety of dramatic genres (domestic tragedy, tales of revenge, city comedies, and more!), we will gain insights into early modern England while exploring issues that continue to pre-occupy us today: economic and class conditions; power; justice; moral and political corruption; anxieties about gender roles, expectations, and identity; family relationships; and of course the importance of having a good time. Playwrights will include Christopher Marlowe, John Webster, Thomas Middleton, Thomas Dekker, Francis Beaumont, and John Ford.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: TBA

  
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    ENG 256 - Ecologies in Crisis: View from the Humanities


    New Earth Conversation Collaborative

    This collaborative asks participants to explore the idea of `ecology’ in cross-cultural perspective, with particular consideration to literary responses to climate change in different cultural and political contexts.  We will think comparatively about the representation of ecological crises, and about likenesses and differences in literary portrayals of environmental thought-including relationships between human and non-human species and objects. The course will explore the cultural and philosophical frameworks that govern dominant modes of extraction and commodification, regimes of energy and power, understandings of waste and disposability, and models for food production and consumption.  `Ecologies in Crisis’ will be offered as a pilot `collaborative’ for Clark’s program in New Earth Conversations. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies either the Period (D-3) or the Theory (E) requirement, but does not double count.

    Course Designation/Attribute: POP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 260 - Making Gender through the Eighteenth-Century Novel


    With an understanding that gender roles became more clearly defined in the eighteenth century, this course traces the formation of masculinity and femininity through the discourses of sexuality, sensibility, and sociability in eighteenth-century British literature. Through contemporary theory on the construction of subjectivity, gender, and sexuality, we will explore popular eighteenth-century literary forms-the romance, domestic, memoir and pornographic-to uncover the ways in which these texts helped to shape perceptions of men and women socially and culturally. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-2) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year.

  
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    ENG 261 - Gender and Genre in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel


    Using the nineteenth-century British novel–the predominant literary form in the mid-to-late nineteenth century–as a springboard, this course explores the intersection between gender and literary genres. Cultural expectations for male and female authors and the literary forms in which they wrote helped to define the literary history of nineteenth-century novels. This course will examine diverse generic models, from the domestic novel and the Bildungsroman to the Gothic and sensation novel, through authors such as Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë and Wilkie Collins. Through a focus on nineteenth-century print culture, we will review the critical positioning and reception of these authors as well as their work. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Period (D-2) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year.

  
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    ENG 262 - Special Topics in 19th-Century British Literature


    Special Topics in 19th-Century British Literature. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Poetry (C-1), or the Period (D-2) or the Theory (E) requirement. For English minors, this course counts as a 200-level English course. This course can be repeated with a different topic.


    TOPIC FOR S’19: GREATER ROMANTIC LYRIC This course examines the transformation of the lyric poem - particularly the ode - from simple observation or insight into an integration of the human consciousness with the natural world - one of the quintessential developments of the Romantic period. We closely read poems by Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats, from “Frost at Midnight” and “Tintern Abbey” to the “Ode to the West Wind” and “To Autumn”.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year.

  
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    ENG 263 - Traumatic Tales: British Romantic Literature and Nationhood


    This course examines the formation of British national identity through its troubling origins in women’s subordination, class hierarchy, slavery, colonial rule and imperialism. Focusing on the slave narrative, confessional poetry and the political and domestic novel, this seminar will explore the ways in which Romantic writers attempted (and often failed) to articulate an alternative national narrative against the national hegemony, which erased state acts of exploitation and terror. To better understand the concept of national trauma, we will also read extensively in psychoanalytic and critical social theory related to genocide, accidents and torture. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-2) or the Theory (E) requirement.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year.

  
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    ENG 272 - Radicalism and the Black Arts Movement


    1966 to 1967

    The Black Arts Movement remains the most radical realization of a literary culture in the history of the United States. Resulting from centuries of racial oppression, this movement is to be understood as black Americans’ revolutionary use of art to express deep-seated existential rage and political critique in order to generate social change and psychological reconstruction. Accordingly, this course will examine the historical factors responsible for the emergence of the Black Arts Movement and will pay special attention to the thinkers and writers responsible for the articulation of its aesthetic manifestos and the production of its literary canon. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Period (D-3) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ENG 275 - Fictions of Empire: Studies in Global English Literature


    This seminar provides an introduction to contemporary global literature in English. The writers we will discuss come from very different backgrounds-from South Asia to Africa to the Caribbean-but they are all engaged with making sense of the legacy of colonialism and the emergence of something we might call global culture. These texts are exciting stylistically because of their inventive uses of language and narrative structure: their experiments with form capture the sense of new nations coming into being, new approaches to cultural tradition, and the new status of English as a global language. The stories they tell entertain while also providing original perspectives on histories of empire marked by political struggle, violent conflict, and global inequalities.   Topics we will consider include: the idea of the “postcolonial”; the relationship between literature and political resistance; the transformation of metropolitan English writing and language; “subalternity” and problems of representation; writing from a position of displacement, exile, and diasporization; and the persistence of colonial narratives in contemporary forms of imperialism. The specific focus of this course will change from year to year, but authors to be discussed may include Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Chinua Achebe, Buchi Emecheta, J.M. Coetzee, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S. Naipaul, Anita Desai, Derek Walcott, and Zadie Smith. For English majors, this course satisfies the Period (D-3) requirement.
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: N/A

  
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    ENG 276 - Ethnic America: Literature, Theory, Politics


    This seminar investigates the ways in which ethnicity is constructed, lived, and contested in contemporary U.S. literature, identity politics, and popular culture. We will focus primarily on works by and about “ethnics” in recent decades that critique the ways in which literary figurations of the “ethnic” and the “American” evolve in relation to one another in response to the vicissitudes of American racial, gender, class, and national politics. The course moves through units organized around the following topics and themes: immigration and diaspora; transnationalism and globalization; internal and semi-colonization; aesthetics and politics; cultural consent and descent; symbolic ethnicity; model and un-model minorities; history and memorialization; border politics and labor; ethnic humor; and “post-ethnicity.” This course fulfills core requirements in the English major and minor, Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies concentration, and Asian Studies concentration. It also fulfills the Diversity and Inclusion requirement. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-3) requirement.

    Prerequisites: VE Placement

    Course Designation/Attribute: DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year

  
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    ENG 279 - Fictions of Asian America


    With particular emphasis on the multiple meanings of “fiction,” this seminar examines the ways in which the Asian American identity is constructed, imagined and contested in American literature and popular culture. Analyses will focus primarily on how texts and films produced within the last decade maintain or challenge established boundaries of the Asian American identity. Specific issues to be investigated include the model minority discourse and the demands of assimilation and citizenship; ethnic authenticity and hybridity; gender roles and sexual anxieties; cultural memory and nostalgia; and the commodification of Asian cultures and identities. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Period (D-3) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year

  
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    ENG 280 - Studies in Contemporary Fiction: Literary Speculations


    This advanced seminar conducts cultural and historical examinations of speculative fiction and theory produced after 1945 in response to prevailing societal anxieties of the times. Topics and subgenres examined include alternate history and reality; plague and apocalypse; technology, artificial intelligence, and artificial life; utopia, anti-utopia, and dystopia; and futurity, afro- and ethnofuturism, and posthumanity. Our investigations will also draw on genre theories to explore the shifting conventions of literary, science, and slipstream fictions, and assess the rhetorical effects of the genre-bending exercises of their authors. Deep engagements with the writings of Rene Girard, N. Katherine Hayles, Achille Mbembe, Lauren Berlant, Fredric Jameson, Tzvetan Todorov, Priscilla Wald and many other theorists will frame our critical examinations.

    Satisfies the Genre (C-2) or Period (D-3) requirement for undergraduate English majors.

    Prerequisites: VE or ENG 20 Introduction to Literary Analysis

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 281 - Special Topics in 19th-C American Literature


    Special topics in 19th-century literature through the Civil War invite in-depth consideration of how extraordinary cultural, political, and technological changes made this one of the most vibrant and studied periods of the American literature.  For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-2) requirement.  May be repeatable for credit.

    SPECIAL TOPIC FALL 2018: AMERICAN LITERARY RENAISSANCE

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 284 - Special Topics in 17th- and 18th-Century American Literature


    Special topics in the earliest periods of American letters provide a broad historical foundation for literary study in all fields as well as the opportunity for in-depth investigation of critical issues of colonial and early Republic culture such as gender, race, religious discourse, scientific progress, and political contest. If taken at the undergraduate level, prerequisite: Major American Writers I or permission of the instructor. A student may take this seminar more than once, as long as the topics differ each time. For undergraduate English majors this course may satisfy the Period (D-1 or D-2) requirement but does not double count. May be repeatable for credit.

     

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 285 - Topics in Seventeenth-Century Literature


    Explores topics in the literary history of the seventeenth century with emphasis in changing ideas in science, history, politics, culture, and science. Depending on the special topic, course may include canonical as well as non-canonical, English as well as New England writing, and texts in a diversity of genres and disciplines.  Satisfies the Period (D-1) requirement.

    May be repeatable for credit, depending on topic.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 290 - Capstone


    The capstone’s purpose is to deepen and broaden each senior major’s knowledge and interpretive skills. We will spend time on the aspects of literature that the department feels every major should know. Throughout the semester, each student will work on a paper of his or her choosing (e.g., a research paper for another seminar, a part of an honor’s thesis). For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Capstone (F) requirement. Seniors only. Only offered in the fall.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Only offered in the fall.

  
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    ENG 293 - Special Topics in African American Literature


    Special Topics in African American Literature.  For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (D-3) requirement.  For English minors, this course counts as a 200-level English course.  May be repeatable for credit.

     

    SPECIAL TOPIC FALL 2018:   THE AFRICAN AMERICAN GOTHIC


    What is the African American Gothic? Scholars agree that African Americans have utilized the Gothic to highlight the horrors of the African American experience beginning with slave narratives up to the present day with films like Jordan Peele’s Get Out. In this course, we will examine and discuss the evolution of the use of the Gothic within African American literature beginning with slavery. This course will begin with the connection of the white fear of slave rebellion and how it connects to the concept of black monstrosity. It is through the basis of race creation, and the fear of the other, that we will follow the evolution along a historical timeline that will end with a focus on Jim Crow segregation. This course will investigate the African American Gothic utilizing philosophical, psychoanalytic, sociological, and historical approaches.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered annually

  
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    ENG 297 - Honors


    Honors in English Senior Year

    Invited and interested students should identify an area of interest with an adviser and apply in writing to the department chair with a brief description of the project before the beginning of the senior year. Honors in English normally carries two credits. With the adviser’s approval, students should register as ENG297 Honors in English for one credit in each of the two semesters of their senior year. The adviser and the student will agree on the project’s stages. However, the department requires that a completed draft be turned in by the first day of the spring semester to the adviser. The final thesis is due three weeks before the last day of the spring semester classes. The department requires one copy of the final thesis. A second reader, chosen by the student and the adviser, participates in the final evaluation. Details are available in the handbook for English majors.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 298 - Internships


    Academic experience taking place in the field with an opportunity to earn credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered for variable credit every year

  
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    ENG 299 - Directed Study


    When asking a faculty member to sponsor directed study courses (299), the student should: 1) demonstrate competence to deal with the materials as literature and 2) present a well thought-out proposal. The student must take the initiative in selecting readings or carrying out the special project. Offered for variable credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 300 - Pedagogy I


    A one-on-one with a departmental faculty member on pedagogy.

  
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    ENG 301 - Pedagogy II


    An advanced one-on-one with a department faculty member enabling the graduate student to acquire expertise in teaching. TAs only.

    Prerequisites: ENG 300 

  
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    ENG 302 - Pedagogy III


    For second-year graduate students who have been awarded a teaching assistantship. Advanced mentoring and classroom assignments as arranged with individual department members. Information available from the chair.

    Prerequisites: ENG 300  and ENG 301 .

  
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    ENG 303 - Pedagogy IV


    A continuation of ENG 302 . See its listing for a complete description.

  
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    ENG 322 - Black Political Literary Movements of the 20th Century


    This course examines the politics and culture of major black literary and cultural movements of the 20th Century across the Diaspora, including (but not limited to) The Harlem Renaissance (or the New Negro Movement), Senghor and Cesaire’s Negritude Movement, Guillen’s Afrocriollo movement, and the Black Arts Movement. We will explore the legal, political, and cultural zeitgeist that gave way to these periods of highly politicized and radicalized literary and cultural production and the legacies of these movements for the contemporary era in the 21st century. 
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENG 325 - American Print Culture, 1700-1900


    The years from 1700 to 1900 witnessed a transformation of print culture from the handpress period to an age of mechanical reproduction. The rapidly increasing availability of inexpensive print technologies had a tremendous impact on habits of publishing, of writing, and of reading itself. In this course, students will examine how the material contexts of print culture in early America affected and were affected by notions of authorship, readership, gender, genre, and popular and elite taste. Some sessions will be conducted at the American Antiquarian Society where students will be able to examine archival material in hands-on workshops. For the final research paper, students will be encouraged to use resources from the AAS, from Goddard Library Special Collections, and/or from the many new digital humanities archives now available online.
     



     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Most years

  
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    ENG 327 - The Book in the Early Modern World



    The rise of the printed book in early modern Europe is associated with corresponding renewal and innovation in science, letters, and theology. As with so many widely accepted narratives, however, the story turns out to be messier, more complicated, and ultimately more interesting than broadly understood. In this seminar, hands-on laboratory assignments with rare material from the Jonas Clark collection at Goddard Library’s Archives and Special Collections supplement readings as students explore major topics in early modern book history-the emergence of the codex; moveable type and the persistence of manuscript; the technology of the early hand press; design issues from typography to bindings; communications circuits; histories of reading; bibliographic identity. Toward the end of the semester, the class holds a Rare Book Open House with exhibits and demonstrations of material from Archives and Special Collections. No previous knowledge is required or expected, but an interest in books as material and technological objects is strongly recommended. The course may be of particular interest to students in English; History; Cultural Studies and Communication; Media, Culture and the Arts; Comparative Literature; Ancient Civilization; Studio Art; and Art History. 
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Most years

  
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    ENG 332 - Modernist Literature


    Examines the literature written primarily between the two World Wars, focusing on aspects of that literature that deal with the autonomy of the individual and his or her existence in the face of overwhelming social forces, history, and culture; literature’s aesthetic relationship to the other arts; and the “mythic method” as technique of the period.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: N/A

  
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    ENG 338 - Contemporary Latino/a Literature


    This course examines the contributions to American literature made by Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans and other Latino/Latina writers in the United States over the last thirty years.  Through a variety of Latino/Latina writing, we will explore the ways in which these writers represent community, class, race, gender, culture, nation, and ethnicity in their works.  We will also examine the ways in which Latinas(os) have manufactured identities within mainstream society, as well as the development of cultural hybrids and other forms of cultural registers.  Representative works of various genres will be read and analyzed within a cultural context;  the testimonio, the auto ethnographic essay, the narrative (novel and short story), drama, poetry and film.  Authors include Gloria Anzaldua, Sandra Cisneros, Luis Valdez, Cristina Garcia, Julia Alvarez, Junot Diaz, Achy Obejas and Piri Thomas

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ENG 340 - Introduction to Graduate Study in English


    Since many forms of literary theories proliferate, Prof. Levin strongly recommends that M.A. candidates take a course in literary theory to complement this course. Introduction to Graduate Studies will examine theories and methodologies pertinent to the study of literature by way of a focus on a special topic.  For fall 2018, the special topic will be `Twenty-First Century Literature’.  What is the role of the humanities in the present moment? How does literature respond to pressing issues such as global inequality and climate change?  What forms does literature take in the contemporary era? M.A. candidates not specifically exempted are required to take this course.

     

    Prerequisites: Seniors by permission only

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every fall semester

  
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    ENG 342 - Graduate Seminar: Special Topics


    Each year the English Department offers a graduate seminar on a topic related to the research interests of one of our faculty. Ideally, participants will find ways to use the methods and scholarship modeled in the class to enrich their own thesis work. The seminar is open to students in the English masters program and to graduate students in other departments as well.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered annually

  
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    ENG 343 - Literary Theory & Global Culture


    This seminar examines the myriad aesthetic choices available to fiction writers in the era commonly referred to as “globalization.” How do we imagine the relationship between literature and contemporary politics? In what ways do the increasingly permeable borders of the modern world reshape our understanding of literature? How does literature help us to understand the new idioms of selfhood that emerge in a global age? Is there a particular literary form that is best suited to represent - and critique - the era in which we live? This course will survey the vocabularies that humanities scholars have invoked to address the rapidly shifting institutions and cultural frameworks of global capitalism, including, for example, questions pertaining to literary aesthetics and form and debates regarding realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will touch upon questions of relativism and discourses of human rights; ways of conceptualizing global belonging and global citizenship; and the aesthetics of realism and postmodernism as responses to world-historical events of the late twentieth century and beyond. Students can expect to encounter philosophically rich texts from key thinkers in postcolonial and cross-cultural studies.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year.

  
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    ENG 345 - Mythopoetics


    This course examines modes and qualities of literary expression where we will find that narratives and poetry convey different expectations, which are also embedded in a variety of worldviews. Frequently, however, authors will attempt to craft these expectations and worldviews to accommodate nontraditional visions. Toward this end, we will read works by authors who strive to come to grips with their own experiences of the world. Texts will include Eliot’s Four Quartets, Joyce’s Ulysses, Plath’s Ariel, and representative poems by Wallace Stevens.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year

  
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    ENG 348 - Contemporary Literary Theory


    Investigates and develops several theoretical approaches to literature in the late-20th and 21st century, attempting to provide glimpses into the range of theoretical issues and concerns. We look particularly at identity formation in contemporary literary, political, economic, cultural and social arenas. May also look at a literary text in relation to theory. General areas of study are selected from among the following: textual criticism, new criticism, psychoanalysis/reader response, structuralism, poststructuralism, feminism, postcolonialism, postmodernism, gay and lesbian theory and Cultural Studies.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered annually

  
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    ENG 350 - Medieval Literature


    Explores medieval literary culture of Western Europe by means of literary theoretical and classical texts. Themes vary each year, and the seminar can be taken more than once for credit, as long as each time a different theme is chosen.

    SPRING 2019 - Medieval Women Writers
    This course examines a range of female-authored texts from the Middle Ages, ranging in date from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries. Given the limitations on women’s writing, this body of work is remarkable for its size and scope: we will read letters written by Anglo-Saxon nuns, romances, fables, love poetry, love letters, medical texts, mystical and visionary literature, theology, autobiography, utopian literature, political theory, and correspondence between aristocratic women. Throughout these readings  we will confront the question of what “women’s writing” means.  Can we find essential characteristics of female-authored texts? Can we locate a female literary ethos in particular genres, or are we encountering a fortuitous selection of “typical” medieval literature? Much of our time will be spent on how women viewed themselves and their own bodies. Female bodies were constrained by a complicated network of social, economic, and political forces, which  intersected with activities that we think of as historical (e.g., the nature of women’s work), literary (e.g., the function and style of women’s poetry), and religious (the tradition of female mysticism). Texts will include works by Hildegard of Bingen, Heloïse, Marie de France, female troubadours, Cristina Mirabilis,  Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, the Pastons, Christine de Pizan, and Joan of Arc.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Periodically

  
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    ENG 351 - Chaucer


    Guides the student through The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Parlement of Fowls, some Canterbury Tales and/or Troilus and Criseyde. All texts are taught in Middle English.  No prior knowledge of Middle English required.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Periodically

 

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