2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
    Feb 07, 2023  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    COMM 1530 - Principles of Management


    Introduces the fundamental managerial of functions planning, organizing, lending and controlling. Through an examination of the major motivational theories of management, we will work to increase our awareness of the personal skills required to be a manager and learn to apply managerial planning, and organizing processes as well as design a control system to measure results.

  
  •  

    COMM 1550 - Melting Pot or Salad Bowl: A Film Exploration of Multicultural America


    People all over the world base their opinions of the United States on what they see in American films. What do Hollywood movies say about the culture of the United States? Are they an accurate portrayal of the country and its culture? This course will examine the history and culture of the United States as presented in film.

  
  •  

    COMM 1710 - Internet Web Site Design & Implementation


    All aspects of web site design are covered from professional management to creative design. Students will work with and learn HTML and CSS, become familiar with free and cheap tools currently available to web developers, and gain an understanding of good web site design and usability. The course is split into three sections covering Basic Code, Design Concepts, and The Business of Web Design. Students need to have web access with a minimum of 2Mb hosting space available through their ISP. (Contact the professor if you have any questions.) Prerequisite: Introduction to Computing or related work experience.

    Prerequisites: Introduction to Computing or related work experience.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    COMM 2020 - Organizational Behavior


     

    In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    COMM 2180 - Interpersonal Communication


    This course will utilize theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop interpersonal communication competence and better understand its role in the relationship context. Specific areas of study include: relationship building and maintenance, intercultural communication, conflict management and interpersonal communications in the organization.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    COMM 2300 - Intercultural Communications


    Utilizes theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to communicate effectively among culturally diverse persons. Areas of study include: conflict management, culture shock, training, ethics, intercultural sensitivity, diversity in the workplace and relationship building.

  
  •  

    COMM 2310 - Topics In Journalism


    Offers students an expanded look at various kinds of stories that appear in newspapers, including hard news, features, columns, analysis and reviews. Focus this semester will be on war coverage, in general, and embedded journalism, in particular.

  
  •  

    COMM 2360 - Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management


    Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.

  
  •  

    COMM 2610 - Critical Perspectives on Television


    This course explores fundamental questions about the cultural significance of television by considering a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to television criticism, including ideological analysis, semiotics, political economy, feminist criticism, narrative, genre and critical race theories. In this course, we use these analytic tools to examine the cultural, political, and economic implications of television as a form of social communication. Our goals are (1) to become familiar with the key aspects of each theoretical perspective and (2) to apply these frameworks in our own analyses of television programs. By requiring students to continuously read, view, discuss, and write about critical perspectives on television, this course cultivates a deep understanding for the ideological and structural dynamics that constitute popular culture.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    CSAC 170 - Computer Mediated Communication


    This course is intended to provide an introduction to those social functions and communities evolving from and developed around computer-aided technologies. Beginning with a definition of computer-mediated communication, students will progress through a meaningful discussion designed to plant them squarely as the focus of our study. How do THEY use these technologies and what is the effect on their lives? In addition to the standard foray of relevant readings and discussions, students will be asked to complete weekly assignments intended to submerge them in virtual spaces and online communities, as well as inter-student communication projects via portable devices, such as cell phones. Upon successful completion of the course, a student will have a better understanding of how technology affects the way they operate and communicate within their daily lives.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    CSAC 203 - Peer Learning Assistant


    Peer Learning Assistants (PLAs) are undergraduate students who are selected by a faculty member to facilitate teaching and learning activities. These activities may include: providing feedback on drafts of writing assignments, leading small group discussions, working with individual students who are having difficulty, and facilitating group project work (in or out of class & online).
    Registration is by instructor permission only

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall & Spring

  
  •  

    CSAC 220 - Communication Ethics


    The course examines a range of issues in the field of ethics as applied to the various areas of culture and communication. This course is intended for students majoring in communications with little or no background in philosophy or ethics. Emphasis will be given to professional aspects and ethical topics which might be encountered when pursuing a contemporary career in a range of professions in the communication field. Specific issues could include: privacy, intellectual property, responsible advocacy, and social responsibility in disseminating information. Lecture/discussion.

    Prerequisites: CSAC 101 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varied

  
  •  

    CSAC 256 - Do-It-Yourself-Media


    This course explores the shapes and themes of “do-it-yourself” media. We examine cases of DIY media, in which non-professionals utilize affordable, accessible technology to produce zines, radio, videos, music or websites, and consider both the experiences of, and reasons behind production. Alongside case studies of practice, we explore themes of DIY media through readings of critical theory. By considering DIY production through the theoretical angles of technological politics, the influence of place on communication, the experience of mediated communities, cultural resistance, and social networks, we pursue a thorough analysis of our topic in an effort to understand the contexts, motives, and ethics of DIY production.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    CSAC 261 - Critical Perspectives On TV


     

    This course explores fundamental questions about the cultural significance of television by considering a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to television criticism, including ideological analysis, semiotics, political economy, feminist criticism, narrative, genre and critical race theories. In this course, we use these analytic tools to examine the cultural, political, and economic implications of television as a form of social communication. Our goals are (1) to become familiar with the key aspects of each theoretical perspective and (2) to apply these frameworks in our own analyses of television programs. By requiring students to continuously read, view, discuss, and write about critical perspectives on television, this course cultivates a deep understanding for the ideological and structural dynamics that constitute popular culture.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    CSAC 281 - Urban Community Journalism


    This class represents a melding of practical and academic approaches to journalism and combines the knowledge on the street with the knowledge of the academy. As such, after several initial weeks of learning some basic reporting skills, this class will turn its focus to the city of Worcester and the Worcester Telegram and Gazette as representatives of urban America and urban journalism. Each week, representatives from different parts of the city infrastructure and community (government, education, business, and the arts) as well as individuals from the T&G who cover these areas will come and speak to the class about the city, the challenges, and their roles within it. In addition, in preparation for the panel discussions, students will have read brief academic articles on the subjects to further inform their perspective and give them an additional scholarly and critical view. 

    The course will meet weekly for a 3 hour session. On days when we have a panel, the panel will meet for roughly 1.5 hours (1 hour for the panel and .5 for questions). The remaining hour and a half of the class will be held for class discussion of the panel and exercises on reporting skills. It is as this point that the careful note taking that students have been doing during the panels will prove invaluable for class discussion. 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Course Already Approved

  
  •  

    CSAC 289 - Honors Thesis Prep


    Students receive variable credit for advanced research and reading in the honors program. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    CSAC 297 - HONORS


    Students receive variable credit for advanced research & readings in the honors program. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: each semester

  
  •  

    CSAC 298 - Internship


    Academic experience taking place in the field with an opportunity to earn credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: all semesters

  
  •  

    CSAC 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member.  Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    CSCI 099 - Computers In Our World


    An introduction to computer technology with an emphasis on social implications where applicable. Lectures will survey topics such as history of computer development from number-crunchers to information-management systems, how computers work, networking protocols including the Internet and World Wide Web. Additionally, the course will explore data representation and programming. Students will learn binary algebra and develop two or three short programs. A laboratory component will give students hands-on experience with software applications, which demonstrate the possibilities enabled by current computer technology. Not applicable to the major requirements in computer science.

    Prerequisites: no prior computer experience is necessary.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: FA

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    CSCI 110 - Diving into Computer Science Research: Modeling Plasmas


    Plasma televisions, plasma lights, the heat around the space shuttle and communication blackout caused by plasma, laser treatments in medicine, and production of microchips for computers are just a few applications of plasmas that have become a big part of our lives.  Students will learn about plasmas by developing and studying mathematical models that explain the experiments and help to obtain plasmas with certain properties.  Students will take part in original research.

    Note:  The year long course is 0.5 unit per semester, and the full year is necessary to complete the research project.  CSci 110 does not satisfy any requirement of the Computer Science major.

     

    Faculty: Natalia Sternberg, PH.D., Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science

     

     

     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: SP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    CSCI 111 - Diving into Computer Science Research: Modeling Plasmas


    Plasma televisions, plasma lights, the heat around the space shuttle and communication blackout caused by plasma, laser treatments in medicine, and production of microchips for computers are just a few applications of plasmas that have become a big part of our lives.  Students will learn about plasmas by developing and studying mathematical models that explain the experiments and help to obtain plasmas with certain properties.  Students will take part in original research.

    Note: The year long course is 0.5 unit per semester, and the full year is necessary to complete the research project.  CSci 110 does not satisfy any requirement of the Computer Science major.

     

    Faculty: Natalia Sternberg, PH.D., Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: FA

    Anticipated Terms Offered: offered every year

  
  •  

    CSCI 120 - Introduction to Computing


    Many natural phenomena can be understood as computational processes governed by the laws of nature.  This not only gives us insight into the nature of the world, but also provides a powerful tool (i.e., the computer) for investigating such phenomena.  In particular, computer experiments are used routinely by scientists (for example, in genetics, molecular biology, chaotic weather patterns, cognitive processes, plasmas, etc.) to understand scientific phenomena and to make predictions from theoretical models.  The computer, in essence, serves as a virtual laboratory for the scientist.  The focus of the course is to learn fundamental computational concepts (information, algorithms, programming) that are central to computer science, and that also happen to be instrumntal for the computational investigation of science.  At the same time, via a variety of case studies, the students  will be introduced to significant natural scientific concepts. Students will gain a working knowledge of one or more programming languages, and use those languages to solve a variety of problems relevant to computer science and the natural sciences.  A laboratory section will meet once a week to give students hands-on practice with programming concepts and techniques.  No prior knowledge of programming is required, but good analytical skills are helpful. 

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: SP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    CSCI 121 - Data Structures


    A continuation of CSCI 120  , with an emphasis on such topics as abstract data types, collections, and dynamic data structures such as linked lists, stacks, queues and binary trees. The usage and implementation of recursion is also discussed, as is the elementary analysis of algorithms. Approximately six programming projects are assigned as the laboratory component of the course. These projects entail the design and implementation of programs involving the topics mentioned above.

    Prerequisites: CSCI 120 .

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: SP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
  •  

    CSCI 124 - Honors Introduction to Computing


    This is an enriched introduction to computing and its diverse applications, with an emphasis on bioinformatics in the fall 2017 offering.  The course aims to teach computational principles and prepare students for solving important real-world problems through effective computation.  Students will learn programming in java and phython, as well as powerful algorithm design methods such as recursion, greedy approach and dynamic programming.  In fall 2017, students will also learn to solve challenging problems in computational biology and other fields through a systematic process of problem formulation, algorithm design, code development and testing.  No prior programming experience is required.  Strong interests in computational problem solving, good analytical skills and work ethics are important for student sucess in the course.

    Prerequisites: Permission Only

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: SP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
  •  

    CSCI 140 - Assembly Language And Computer Organization


    Covers fundamentals of assembly language programming such as data representation, the instruction set, addressing mode, macros, procedures, input and output facilities, assembler and linker, introduction to logic circuits and the basic machine organization of conventional computers. The goal is to understand how a computer performs various tasks that are completely hidden from the user in a high-level language. For the laboratory component, students will write several programs in assembly language. Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C or better.

    Prerequisites: CSCI 121 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    CSCI 160 - Algorithms


    Emphasizes how the design of algorithms is supported by advanced data structures such as sets, trees, and graphs. Applications to searching and sorting are discussed. Topics include: design and analysis of algorithms, general trees, balanced trees, priority queues, hash tables, merge-sort, quick-sort, radix sorting and searching, and elementary graph algorithms. Programming projects are assigned for the laboratory component.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C or better in CSCI 121  and MATH 114 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    CSCI 170 - Analysis Of Programming Languages


    Deals with the issues of the design and implementation of programming languages from both the syntactic and the semantic point of view. Topics include: the representation of rules of syntax, using context-free grammars, parsing, semantic constructs, control structures, implementation of procedures and parameters, implementation of recursion and an introduction to the organization of compilers. A typical group term project may be to design and implement a compiler or interpreter for the actual implementation of some language.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C or better in CSCI 121  and MATH 114 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    CSCI 180 - Automata Theory


    Studies the abstract models of machines and languages recognized by them and introduces the concept of computability. Begins with a review of sets, functions and relations, then continues with finite automata and regular languages, pushdown automata and context-free grammars, grammar transformations and normal forms, and finally the mathematical model of modern computers: Turing machines and computable functions. Some examples of unsolvable problems, such as the halting problem, will be discussed. Involves a fourth-hour problem-solving session.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C or better. CSCI 121  and MATH 114 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    CSCI 201 - Proseminar In Computer Science


    The presentation of topics in computer science by and for senior undergraduates. These presentations acquaint students with diverse subjects, introduce them to researching known topics and give them practice in presenting material to their peers. Faculty members will also present some research topics. Possible areas the topics may be drawn from might include robotics, networking, NP complete problems, neural networks, expert systems, parallel algorithms.

     

    Fall 2016: Machine Learning

    Studies techniques for solving complex problems by learning solutions from simpler data.  Students learn about a variety of Machine Learning techniques, where they are applicable, and their strengths and weaknesses as well as standard methods for evaluating the performance of such systems.  Students investigate these techniques by applying them to a variety of problems.  Specific techniques may include: decision trees, neural networks, hidden Markov models, reinforcement learning, and support vector machines.  Problems may be drawn from image and audio recognition, natural language processing, classification, function approximation, and robotics.  Students gain practical experieince designing, implementing, and testing a project. 

    May be repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites: Fall 2016 prerequisites: CSCI 160 or instructor permission.
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    CSCI 210 - Artificial Intelligence


    Focuses on the fundamental ideas of artificial intelligence and programming in Lisp. Topics included are knowledge representation schemes, problem representation through explicit models, search techniques, analogy and pattern recognition, natural language parsing and planning. Students implement the above ideas through computer programs written in Lisp. Language instruction is provided in Lisp (or Prolog), although no prior knowledge of these programming languages is assumed.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C- or better in CSCI 160 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 212 - Numerical Analysis


    Introduces concepts and techniques of scientific computing to students in mathematics, computer science and the sciences. Teaches how to set up reasonable computational algorithms and use the algorithms to work on actual projects. Topics include approximation theory, error analysis, numerical differentiation and integration, and solution of ordinary differential equations and linear systems.
    Fulfills a 200-level math major requirement.
     

    Counts as a 200-Level Math Class.

    Prerequisites:

      or MATH 130  and MATH 172  or permission

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 215 - Operating Systems


    Studies the structure, performance and design of operating systems. Topics include concurrency, deadlocks, scheduling and memory management. Various operating systems may be examined and compared. Students will design and implement parts of operating systems.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C- or better. CSCI 160 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 220 - Database Management And Systems Design


    An advanced course on the realities of database technology. Emphasizes the goals of database management: performance, data integrity, future compatibility and versatility. The concept of the data model is examined and a specific database is discussed. Concentrates on database design and specification.

    Prerequisites: CSCI 160 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 250 - Software Engineering


    Students consider the life cycle of large software projects, beginning with the elicitation and definition of users’ requirements and continuing through software design, documentation, coding, testing and maintenance. Topics include: modularity, coupling, cohesion, transformational and transactional structures and testing strategies. Working in teams, students gain practical experience developing software to solve concrete problems.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C- or better. CSCI 160  and CSCI 170 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    CSCI 255 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms


    This course will provide a rigorous introduction to the design and analysis of algorithms. It covers advanced data structures and algorithms, design techniques such as divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, complete search and reduction, algorithm analysis including correctness proof, running time and memory space analysis, as well as tractability issues such as NP-Completeness. Additional topics may include randomized algorithms and approximation algorithms.  

    Prerequisites: CSCI 160, Algorithms, a grade of C- or better

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Spring 2016

  
  •  

    CSCI 260 - Computer Graphics


    This course provides an introduction to computer graphics with an emphasis on the underlying theory and on the use of the graphics library OpenGL as application programming interface (API). We will study the theoretical foundations and algorithmic issues in class and will learn and use OpenGL as the particular API for writing graphics programs in programming assignments.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C- or better. Data Structures and Algorithms (CSCI 160 ) and familiarity with matrix algebra (MATH 130 ), or instructor’s permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 262 - Computer Vision


    This course studies the fundamentals of computer vision and its application to interdisciplinary problems. Students learn about computer vision techniques to create computer systems that analyze images automatically and determine what the computer “sees”.  The computer vision is then applied to problems in Human-Computer Interaction, for example, to create new interfaces for human users, or in biology or remote sensing for geographic information systems.  Students investigate research methods and apply them to creating video-based interactive systems.  Students gain practical experience designing, implementing, and testing a project.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CSCI 160 Algorithms

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Spring 2017

  
  •  

    CSCI 265 - Robotics


    This course presents an introduction to robotics. In addition to algorithmic issues, the course will cover related engineering and system topics and discuss current research problems. Topics covered include hierarchical paradigms, biological foundations, robot actuators and sensors, sensing techniques, kinematics, and dynamics, control, localization and motion planning. Students will get hands on experience through computer simulation or physical experiments with robot project-component kits. Students should be interested in geometric concepts and algorithms and have good programming skills.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C- or better. Algorithms (CSCI 160 ) and familiarity with matrix algebra (MATH 130 ), or instructor’s permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 270 - Theory of Computation


    Studies the nature and formal models of computation (by computers), its power and limitation (computability versus uncomputability), the computational complexity of various problems and the applications in logic and computer science. Turing machines, general recursive functions and other standard models of computation are introduced. Other aspects of recursion theory, such as unsolvable problems and recursively enumerable languages, are introduced. We also address the more practical question, “What is an efficient program?” in an introduction to modern complexity theory.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C- or better. CSCI 180 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 280 - Computer Networks


    Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of the design of computer and communications networks. The TCP/IP Model will be used as the framework with the course progressing through the physical, data link, network and transport layers. Analysis of network topologies and protocols, including performance analysis, is treated. Current network types including local-area and wide-area networks are introduced, as are evolving network topologies. Laboratory exercises include the design and implementation of projects such as simulation of the network/transport layer functions, routing, congestion control, an Ethernet controller, applications using TCP/IP or remote procedure calls. There may be extensive network programming assignments.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this course require a grade of C- or better in CSCI 160 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    CSCI 297 - HONORS


    Readings and research for students in the honors program.  May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: each semester

  
  •  

    CSCI 298 - Internship


    An Academic internship is a practical work experience with an academic component that enables a student to gain knowledge and skills within an organization, industry, or functional area that reflects the student’s academic and professional interests while earning credit. Maybe repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
  •  

    CSCI 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
  •  

    CSCI 1010 - Introduction to Computing


    Introduces computer hardware systems and software applications. This is a hands-on course that teaches the MS operating system and an introductory to intermediate level of the Microsoft Office Suite application: Word (word processing), Excel (spreadsheets), PowerPoint (presentations) and Access (database). Skills learned are directly usable in the workplace and other coursework. No prior computer experience is necessary.

  
  •  

    CSCI 1090 - Python Programming


    This course provides a general introduction to the Python programming language. Topics include the Python programming environment; elements of the language, such as functions, conditionals, recursions, iterations, and file operations; basic data types, such as lists and dictionaries; and concepts of classes and objects.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    CSCI 1710 - Internet Web Site Design & Implementation


    All aspects of web site design are covered from professional management to creative design. Students will work with and learn HTML and CSS, become familiar with free and cheap tools currently available to web developers, and gain an understanding of good web site design and usability. The course is split into three sections covering Basic Code, Design Concepts, and The Business of Web Design. Students need to have web access with a minimum of 2Mb hosting space available through their ISP. (Contact the professor if you have any questions.) Prerequisite: Introduction to Computing or related work experience.


  
  •  

    CSCI 1770 - Introduction to Management Information Systems


    Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: FA (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: -

  
  •  

    CSCI 1900 - Introduction to Computer Security Essentials


    A practical survey of network security applications and standards. The emphasis is on applications and standards that are widely used on the Internet and for corporate networks.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2000 - Ethics in Information Technology


    This course offers extensive and topical coverage of the legal, ethical, and societal impications of information technology. Students will learn about issues such as file sharing, infringement of intellectual property, security risks, Internet crime, identity theft, employer suveillance, privacy, compliance, social networking, and ethics of IT corporations. Students will gain an excellent foundation in ethical decision making for current and future business managers and IT professionals.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    CSCI 2030 - Introduction to Java Programming


    Introduces the elements of Java programming language. Topics include input/output operations, control structures, arithmetic operations, arrays, strings, praphical user interface(GUI), object-oriented design and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug Java application programs and Java applets for web application.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2040 - Data Communication


    The main goal of this course is to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of data communications and networking technologies, concepts and terminology. Students learn how to design, install, maintain and troubleshoot both local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs). Students will learn the basics of telecommunications, home and office networking technologies, wireless networking technologies, protocols of data communications, LAN cabling, and internetworking. This course prepares students to sit for CompTIA¿s Net+ certification examinations. You will learn about the equipment and technologies used in LANs and WANs. You will learn about the network topologies used today and design a network using these topologies. A variety of network equipment will be discussed, including hubs, routers, switches, and NICs. LAN architectures are covered including Ethernet, token ring, and FDDI. Also, you will learn about wide area networking technologies and remote access technologies such as X.25, ISDN, frame relay, ATM, DSL, SMDS, and SONET networks. Wireless networking and handheld computing is also discussed.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
  •  

    CSCI 2050 - Introduction to Operating Systems


    The most fundamental of all computer system programs is the operating system, which controls the computers resources and provides the foundation for application programs. This course introduces and investigates the fundamentals of operating systems. Among the areas discussed are process scheduling, memory management and file items. A case study is used to compare and contrast various operating systems.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2060 - Computer Architecture Fundamentals


    Computer architecture is the study of the organization of computer systems. It could be described as a course in the anatomy and physiology of computers–how computers are put together and how the various components work as a system. You will look at the internal structure of the computer, the manner in which data are stored and manipulated, the capabilities of the computer at the machine level, the types of instructions a computer can perform, and how to get data into and out of the computer. A basic understanding of computers such as would be obtained from experience as a user or an introductory computer course is expected.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2080 - An Introduction to C++


    Introduces C++ programming language. Topics include input/output operations, control structures, arithmetic operations, arrays, pointers, string, classes and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug C++ language programs. Microsoft Visual C++ is available in the lab.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2110 - Data Security


    This course will provide students with an overview of the field of information security and assurance. Students will explore the spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures in use today as well as obtain a foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Topics covered will include inspection and protection of information assets, detection of and reaction to threats to information assets, and examination of pre- and post-incident procedures, technical and managerial responses, and an overview of the information security planning and staffing functions.



  
  •  

    CSCI 2150 - Database Managment


    Presents concepts of database management systems. Covers theories of database design as well as methods for developing and implementing on-line information systems. Includes practical experience with one or more existing DBMS packages.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2200 - Software Engineering


    Provides an overview of current practices in management and software process technology for the novice software practitioner. Topics to be covered will include: software requirements capture and analysis, software design methodologies, both top down and object oriented, software costing models, project planning and monitoring techniques, software testing and quality assurance and recent work from the Software Engineering Institute.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2240 - Distributed Systems


    Introduces Distributed Operating Systems and distributed systems in general. We will focus on the principles and paradigms such as communication, process, naming, synchronization, consistency and replication, fault tolerance and security. We will also cover object based systems, distributed file systems, document based systems and coordination based systems.

    Prerequisites: Introduction to Operating Systems

    Anticipated Terms Offered: various

  
  •  

    CSCI 2270 - Computer Forensics


    Presents methods to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation, beginning with a discussion of ethics while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification. Students should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises.

  
  •  

    CSCI 2930 - Project Management


    This course provides you with a practical understanding of successful IT project planning and management in a business or personal setting. Emphasis will be on using project management tools and techniques tailored for small and medium-sized organizations. The course will help you to develop your project management skills and provide you with the tools required to manage all phases of project including initiation, planning, executing, controlling and closing projects. The use of project management techniques such as developing a project charter, stakeholder identification, developing the scope of the project via a work breakdown structure (WBS), schedule development, team management and tracking projects will be covered. The role of the successful project manager will also be discussed.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
  •  

    CSCI 2970 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
  •  

    CYES 250 - Social Justice Participatory Research Practices


    This is an advanced seminar that combines an in-depth examination of research in critical ethnography, participatory action research, and the learning sciences, with classroom-based research in an after-school school Poetry and Art Club (designed, led, and researched by participants in the class) or in other urban education settings.

    Participants, under the guidance of advanced Peer Leaders and the Instructor, will plan and implement a weekly after-school program for local middle school students – centering on translation, identity, and public voice, or find an alternative participatory research site (such as working with teachers implementing new approaches to teaching science based on the Next Generation Science Standards). As apprenticing practioner-researchers, participants will learn ethnographic and discourse analytic research methods, the theories and assumptions behind these methods, and participate in planning and enacting innovative research and design studies with urban teachers and students.

    The seminar involves 3 hours per week of fieldwork in a teaching site (TBD) in addition to regular class sessions.  This course is a requirement for CYES majors, and will count as an elective for the CYES and Education Minor, as well as counting as a “Qualitative Methodologies,” “Problems of Practice” or “Capstone” requirement for Culture Studies and Communication (CSAC) Major or Minor.  The course is by permission only.

    Prerequisites: EDUC 152  or EDUC 060  

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Spring

  
  •  

    CYES 295 - Praxis Design


    The overarching purpose of the Praxis Design course is to prepare CYES students to develop their portfolios and prepare them to launch their community-based praxis project.  The praxis project is a long-term action research project in which students, deeply immersed in a community space, will engage with others to create greater social justice and document the process in a large socially just research model.  Hopefully, students enter the Praxis Design course already well-situated in a space where they want to conduct their praxis projects. If not, they will need to find their sites and become situated in the first few weeks of the course. 

    The course is designed so that students will finalize their own theorizing on the three theories of understanding that guide the CYES major: 1) a critical theory of social inequality, 2) a reflexive analysis of social and cultural identity and 3) a theory of social change .  As such, they are expected to revise and finalize their earlier thinking about each theory of understanding producing final portfolio pieces for each.  Students will draw from writings created in earlier coursework to develop their final portfolio pieces.  Class time will be devoted to discussing course readings, interrogating the linkages between theory and practice, and workshopping their portfolio pieces. Students will develop and publish to their final portfolio pieces in the first half of the semester.  These larger and more general portfolio pieces will then become situated as students develop their Praxis Project Proposals, negotiate the IRB process, and get fully prepared to launch their Praxis Projects.

    Prerequisites: This course is only for students who have declared the major of Community, Youth and Education Studies (CYES) and are in the junior year. 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Spring

  
  •  

    CYES 298 - Internship


    An Academic internship is a practical work experience with an academic component that enables a student to gain knowledge and skills within an organization, industry, or functional area that reflects the student’s academic and professional interests while earning credit. Maybe repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
  •  

    CYES 299 - Directed Study


    Independent study for qualified students on a selected topic. Permission of instructor required. Offered for variable credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Each Semester

  
  •  

    ECON 005 - Europe at the Crossroads


    Economics 005 explores both the foundationis of and the challenges to the European Union, which is the European experiment to create a unified goods, labor, and capital market across 27 countries of Europe.  The course also examines the economic issues surronding the common currency, the Euro.  Integrating lectures and discussions, the basic economics of the European Union are explained.  Field trips provide the student with opportunities to discuss various aspects of the European Union with experts in Luxembourg, Germany, and Belgium.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: May term

  
  •  

    ECON 010 - Economics and the World Economy


    This course provides an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies.  The course develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy.  Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy.  These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.  Open to first-year students.  Fulfills the global comparative perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
  •  

    ECON 011 - Principles of Economics


    This course offers an introduction to microeconomics:  the analysis of firms, consumers and markets using economic models.  The first part of the course explains how individual actors in the economy, both consumers and producers, make economic decisions and how global economic conditions can affect those decisions.  The course then examines the implications of those decisions for both competitive markets and for markets where firms can influence prices or output (such as monopoly).  The course also helps students analyze the trade-offs of government interventions in markets and situations in which the free market fails to ensure the best use of resources for a society and discusses possible solutions.

    Prerequisites: ECON 010  or ECON 100 .

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: FA

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
  •  

    ECON 108 - International Economics: Trade and Finance


    Reviews the basic principles of international economics. Examines policy issues in international trade and foreign investment, and explores policy alternatives. Not a prerequisite for ECON 207  or ECON 208 , but may be taken in preparation for them.

    Prerequisites: ECON 010 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    ECON 128 - Intro to Economic Development


    This course serves as an introduction to development economics. We will study the economic circumstances and problems of the poor in low income countries.  The course considers the contributions economic analysis can make to understanding poverty at the household and national levels.  It reviews alternative theories of economic growth and examines a number of issues central to the lives of the more than 5.5 billion people who live in the developing world.   Offered in alternate years with ECON 228 . Students may not take both ECON 128 and ECON 228 .

    Prerequisites: ECON 010 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 160 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis


    Examines basic concepts and techniques of statistical method in economic analysis: descriptive statistics, probability theory, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and simple and multiple regression.

    Prerequisites: ECON 010  or ECON 100 .

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: FA

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
  •  

    ECON 204 - Microeconomic Theory Using Calculus


    This course introduces to students a set of analytical tools that economists developed to study the behavior of consumers and firms and different market mechanisms.  It starts with the theories of the consumer and the producer, then examines competitive market equilibrium, and finally discusses the situations in which efficient resource allocations can not be achieved in competitive markets.  Interspersed with theory, the course contains frequent examples that demonstrate the use of microeconomics in solving problems faced by decision makers in both the private and public sectors.  Concepts, techniques, and results from Calculus are regularly used to facilitate theoretical analysis.  The main distinction of this course from Econ 205 is the use of calculus.

    Prerequisites:  ,   and   or   .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: every year

  
  •  

    ECON 205 - Microeconomic Theory


    Describes and analyzes how a market-oriented economy functions in answering the five basic economic questions: (a) What commodities to produce? (b) How much of each to produce? (c) What productive techniques to use and how to provide incentives? (d) How to distribute the output among the various members of society? (e) What provision to make for the future? Interspersed with theory, the course contains frequent examples that demonstrate the use of microeconomics in solving problems faced by decision makers in both the private and public sectors.

    Prerequisites: ECON 011  and  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 206 - Macroeconomic Theory


    Macroeconomics is one of the core elements of economics. The subject includes the study of the determinants and behavior of the aggregate economy, including income, employment and the price level. The economy is examined at a point in time (statics) as well as over time (dynamics).

    Prerequisites:    and   .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 207 - International Trade Theory


    Studies international trade theory and policy at the intermediate level. Examines the fundamentals of international trade theory: comparative advantage, gains from trade, neoclassical trade theory, trade and income distribution. Traditional and modern instruments of protectionism, arguments for and against free trade and the role of international institutions are discussed.

    Prerequisites:   and  ECON 205  is recommended.

    Corequisites:   

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    ECON 213 - Money and Banking


    This course provides an analysis of money, commercial banking and central banking with emphasis on monetary policy implementation by the Federal Reserve System and the resulting economic impact both nationally and internationally.  In addition, the course will prepare students for participation in the Fed Challenge competition held annually at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Prerequisites:  ,   and  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall annually

  
  •  

    ECON 222 - Labor


    Applies the concepts of labor supply and labor demand in a basic model of labor markets. The model is used to analyze the results of the labor market: wages, employment and unemployment. The analysis is modified to allow for market imperfections and nonmarket forces, including trade unions and the government. Further topics include wage discrimination and income inequality.

    Prerequisites:   and  

    Corequisites:  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    ECON 224 - Applied Game Theory


    Game theory is the formal study of situations in which individuals make decisions that will influence one another’s welfare. It provides a set of analytical tools that are useful for scholars in all branches of social sciences as well as for practical decision-makers. This course offers an introduction to game theory with an emphasis on its applications. It covers applications in economics, business, political science, sociology, international relations, psychology, biology, and recreation. No prior knowledge of game theory is presumed and the required mathematical background is minimal (high school algebra and one course in calculus will be sufficient).

    Prerequisites:  ,  , and MATH 120  or MATH 124  or instructor’s permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    ECON 226 - Industrial Organization


    Takes the concepts learned in Intermediate Microeconomic Theory to the next level. More complicated theories of firm behavior are examined. By allowing issues such as product differentiation and imperfect knowledge to enter the analysis, students gain access to more realistic views of industrial structure and performance. Practical applications of these theories can then be examined through the use of specific industry studies.

    Prerequisites:   and ECON 011 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    ECON 232 - Policy Evaluation and Education in Developing Countries


    This course provides an introduction to the economics of education, discussing the basic theory of human capital and providing an overview of some of the main empirical research on education in developing countries.  The focus of the class is on learning analytical and statistical tools for policy evaluation.  We will use statistical software to analyze data and estimate causal effects with some of the main methodologies used in impact evaluation - randomization, matching, differences-in-differences, and regression-discontinuity.  We will study how these techniques have been applied to the study of various education policies in the developing world, including cash transfers, information and health interventions, elimination of school fees, school quality improvements.

    Prerequisites: ECON 010 ECON 011 , and  ECON 160  (or another statistics or quantitative methods course such as GEOG 110  or PSYC 105 )

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    ECON 248 - Living on the Edge? Latin America, Asia and the Global Economy since 1600


    This course explores the role of the world economy in the economic development of what was once known as the periphery - Asia and Latin America - over the period 1600-1990.  The course uses the tools of basic trade theory and international macroeconomics to understand the impact of two signal events on Latin American and Asian economic development.  The “Great Divergence” was when the Asian periphery first fell behind northwest Europe and the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries.  Parallel events saw Latin American economies fall behind the United States.  The First Globalization of the second half of the 19th century through the 1920s marked the emergence of trade and financial integration between the developed North and developing South.  The break-up of the global economy during the Great Depression and decolonization prompted national experiments that emphasized decoupling from the world economy.  Why countries turned away from those experiments ca. 1990 to pursue today’s integration with the global economy is a key question for the course.  The historical perspective informs our understanding of current debates about de-industrialization, the existence of a resource curse and the suitability of various models - the east Asian model, export-led growth, labor-intensive growth or import substitution industrialization - for achieving consistent economic performance.

    Prerequisites:    and  

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: spring 2014

  
  •  

    ECON 250 - Economics of Sport


    Applies economic analysis to the sports industry. While the primary focus is on professional team sports, individual and amateur sports are covered as well. Labor relations, antitrust law, public subsidization of sports facilities, discrimination and sports broadcasting are among the topics that are covered from an economics perspective.

    Prerequisites:   and ECON 011 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
  •  

    ECON 254 - Environmental Economics


    This course examines the economic tools used for analyzing and solving problems related to environmental quality.  Students will learn about cost-benefit analysis, a framework for examining the economic efficiency of environmental programs or projects, explore alternative methods for determining the economic values of non-marketed goods and services, and gain an understanding of the policy mechanisms that can be used to control pollution.  Specific attention is given to air and water pollution, hazardous waste management, and global climate change.

    Prerequisites: ECON 010  and ECON 011  are required.  ECON 160   is recommended.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: bi-annually

  
  •  

    ECON 256 - Modeling Ecological-Economic Systems


    Models are simplified representations of the real world which can be used to convey information, generate and test hypotheses, and make predictions about what will happen in the future.  This course introduces students to the art and science of systems modeling with a focus on coupled natural-human systems.  Lectures help students learn how to translate “word problems” into integrated systems of model components using mathematical equations.  Labs provide students with hands-on experience in the design and construction of working models using computerized spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel).  Applications will be drawn from a range of natural resource economics issues including multiple-use forestry, fish and wildlife harvesting, and water resource management. Math 120 or equivalent recommended.

    Prerequisites: ECON 010  ECON 011  ECON 160  (minimum grade of C- needed for ECON 160)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: spring bi-annually

  
  •  

    ECON 258 - The Economics and Policy of Food


    This course covers the U.S. food system from an applied economic perspective.  The social, environmental, and economic costs and benefits of food production, distribution, and consumption will be examined and policy implications developed.  By doing so, a greater understanding of the positive and negative aspects of the food systems will be developed.  The course will be an eclectic mixture of lectures, guest speakers, documentary screenings, and discussions.

    Prerequisites:  ,   and   

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    ECON 265 - Econometrics


    This course deals with the application of statistical methods to economics. The objective is to expose students to economic model building, testing the model statistically, and applying the model to practical problems in forecasting and analysis. By understanding the theoretical and econometric basis of equations, students gain proficiency in formulating, estimating and interpreting testable relationships on their own.

    Prerequisites:  , ECON 011  and ECON 160  (minimum grade of C- needed for ECON 160)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 271 - Introduction to Mathematical Economics


    An introductory survey of the use of mathematical methods in economic analysis. Topics include elements of linear algebra, optimization and differential equations.

    Prerequisites:  , ECON 011  and one of the following math classes:  MATH 119 , MATH 120 , or MATH 124 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 277 - Urban Economics


    Urban economies provide most of the employment in the developed world and the most dynamic sector of developing economies. Cities are also home to a growing share of the world’s residents. This course offers an overview of two key dimensions of the economies of urban areas: the process of agglomeration and the forces shaping where people live and work. The course applies theoretical insights from urban economics to questions facing urban areas, including the question of crime, housing, urban sprawl, and spatial segregation by race and income. Our discussion draws upon examples from Beijing to Berlin to Worcester.

    Prerequisites:   and ECON 011 .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offerered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 297 - Honors


    Students work on an individual basis with a faculty member on an intensive piece of research, culminating in an honors thesis. The honors course meets regularly in the fall semester (with regular assignments) and occasionally in the spring (when the thesis is written).  Students must register for the ECON297 course in the fall, and most students also register for a second credit in the spring (although only one credit counts towards the economics major).  Required for departmental honors. May be repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 298 - Internship


    Students spend a semester working full or part time outside the University as part of their academic experience. To qualify, the internship experience must significantly involve an extension, embodiment or illustration of previous or concurrent, systematic academic work in economics. This course does not count toward the economics major. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 299 - Independent Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member.  Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 301 - Microeconomics-Foundations


    This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence in microeconomic theory.  It is designed to acquaint students with the standard mathematical tools that economists developed to analyze demand, supply, and competitive markets.  This course will cover topics such as the producer theory, consumer theory, choice under uncertainty, and general equilibrium analysis.  The goal is to help students grasp a set of microeconomic modeling techniques so that they will be able to apply them to the study of various economic and social phenomena.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 302 - Microeconomics-Topics


    This course is primarily concerned with topics associated with market failure:  imperfect competition, externalitites/public goods and information economics.  In our study of imperfect competition, we use game theory to build static and dynamic models of oligopoly.  We study the issues with the presence of externalities/public goods which undermines the Pareto optimality of market equilibrium.  The economics of information will address market failure due to asymmetric/imperfect information.  Topics covered include adverse selection, moral hazard and mechanism design.

    Prerequisites: ECON 301 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 303 - Macroeconomics - Growth


    This is one course in a two-semester core course series in Macroeconomics at the first-year graduate-level.  The focus of this course will be on the theory and empirics of the macroeconomics of the long-run; i.e., economic growth.  The treatment of topics will be mathematically rigorous.  Topics include the Neoclassical Growth model, the Optimal Growth model, Endogenous Technological growth models, Unified Growth theories, fundamental growth theories, and will also include a derivation of the Canonical Growth Regression and a detailed discussion of Growth Econometrics.

    Prerequisites: ECON 301 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 304 - Macroeconomics II- Business Cycles


    This course introduces real business-cycle theory as well as monetary models and business cycle theory with nominal rigidities in a closed economy setting.  The course also presents the microeconomic foundations of nominal rigidities, the demand for money and the effect of monetary policy and dynamic inconsistency.

    Prerequisites: ECON 303 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
  •  

    ECON 307 - International Economics


    This course will cover the theory of international trade patterns, trade policies, and empirical work in both these areas.  We will strive to achieve a balance between theory, empirical literature, and current work on international trade.  In doing so, it will emphasize both theoretical (mathematical/analytical) models as well as empirical studies of how well those models fit “real world” data.  Moreover, the course will frequently compare and contrast alternative theories/conceptions of the nature of international trade and the gains or losses thereof.  Understanding the economic intuition behind the technically demanding models as well as thinking critically about the assumptions behind the theories and how well they fit actual trading economies will be a major focus.

    Prerequisites: ECON 302 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: periodically

  
  •  

    ECON 317 - Research


    This is a variable unit graduate course for students engaged in research at the PhD level.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
  •  

    ECON 322 - Labor Economics


    Graduate-level course analyzing models of labor supply, labor demand, and labor market equilibrium.  Particular attention is paid to connecting theoretical models to empirical applications.  Variations on models that account for market imperfections and non-market forces such as trade unions and government regulations are also addressed.

    Prerequisites: ECON 302 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
  •  

    ECON 326 - Industrial Organization


    This course is a comprehensive treatment of the standard topics in the field of industrial organization.  It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques.  It will start the process of preparing economics Ph.D. students to conduct thesis research in the area, and may also be of interest to doctoral students working in other areas of economics and related fields.

    Prerequisites: ECON 302 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: every other year

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 20