2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
    Feb 07, 2023  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
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    GEOG 383 - Introduction to Remote Sensing


    This course is designed to introduce the students to the principles and analytical methods of satellite remote sensing as applied to environmental systems (e.g., land-cover classification, vegetation monitoring, etc.). Lectures will cover principles of remote sensing, sensor types, as well as the processing and analysis of multispectral satellite images (e.g. Landsat and SPOT). A series of hands-on lab exercises will complement students’ understanding of lecture material and also helps students to become familiar with image processing functions of the IDRISI image analysis software. Particular emphasis will be placed on final group project that brings a real world perspective to the learning process. Open to doctoral and masters students.

    Prerequisites: Vector GIS or Raster GIS, and must register for Lab.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year.

  
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    GEOG 385 - Proposal Writing


    Offered for variable credit to geography doctoral students only who are working on their proposal writing.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    GEOG 386 - Special Topics


    Devoted to a specific topic unique for each semester and instructor. Designed for doctoral students.

    SPRING 2018

    SEC. 1 - MCCARTHY: POLITICAL ECOLOGIES OF ENERGY AND CLIMATE - This course will examine the interlinked issues of climate change and evolving geographies of energy, new and old, through the framework of political ecology. We will focus primarily on recent and current works.; SEC. 2 - BEST: GEOGRAPHIES OF RACE AND SPECULATION - Critical geographies call our attention to the ways in which practices of speculation have produced spaces of difference and domination. In this seminar, drawing from a range of critical geographical perspectives-anti- and post-colonial, feminist, black, and otherwise radical-we seek to explore two primary questions. The first, how does speculative action create architectures of difference (specifically “racial-sexual hierarchies”)? The second, how has speculative thought opened up ways of understanding human geographies that go beyond simply mapping intersections of race and place and instead seek to imagine more livable worlds?; SEC. 3 - ALVAREZ LEON: CRITICAL GIS - The objective of this course is for students to develop mapping and spatial analysis skills in conjunction with the theoretical tools necessary to use such skills in a rigorous, critical practice. In an environment characterized by the proliferation of digital datasets and new spatial media, there is pressing need for technically-informed critical inquiry -a foundation of responsible data production and consumption. This course provides a theoretical perspective that incorporates insights form fields such as Critical GIS, Information Studies and Science and Technology Studies.  The structure of the course is divided in two types of weekly sessions: (1) seminar sessions, where the class will discuss and workshop through key readings, concepts, and examples of the Critical GIS curriculum, and (2) laboratory sessions, where the class will focus on the learning and practice of spatial analysis and mapping tools. The technical component of the course centers on becoming familiar and comfortable with the use of the R software as a means for spatial analysis and mapping. Through weekly reading, discussion, and group exercises, the students will refine their critical grasp of the technical tools they acquire. In this process, they will develop a GIS practice that is both technically competent and sensitive to the broader social, political, and epistemological implications of geospatial tools and technologies. This course is aimed at upper level undergraduates, as well as graduate students. It meets twice weekly, and assumes no prior knowledge of R, spatial analysis, or critical GIS.; SEC. 4 - ROY CHOWDHURY: GLOBAL CHANGE, FOOD AND FARMING SYSTEMS - This course explores issues in global, regional and local systems of food production and consumption, emphasizing the linkages of those systems to global environmental and economic change. We will explore interactions between agriculture and human societies (past and present), and consider the role of adaptation in agricultural innovation, decision-making, diffusion and change. The origins of agriculture (overview, major food crops in use today) will preface our analysis of contemporary farming systems. Themes such as demographic change, political economy and environment-development policy will be explored in detail throughout the course. Particular attention will be directed to the implications of changing land use systems, climate regimes, and economic liberalization and globalization. We will study the implications of industrialization, urbanization, sociodemographic shifts, and institutional change for the diversity, supply, distribution and future of food, and for the broader sustainability of agro-ecosystems. Undergraduates by special permission only; SEC. 5 - SANGERMANO: HABITAT MODELING (MODULE B) - This course introduces niche-based habitat suitability modeling and evaluation through lectures and hand-on exercises. 

     

    FALL 2017

    SEC. 1 - ROY CHOWDHURY: LAND AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE Permission required. SEC. 2 - EASTMAN: RASTER SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT I Permission required. Students registering for this course must have completed a summer internship at Clark Labs. During the internship, students learn the Delphi Windows system development platform, the architecture of the TerrSet software system, best practices for raster analysis and the basics of the Windows Graphical Device Interface. In this follow-on course, students carry out independent development projects that may ultimately be incorporated into the TerrSet system. SEC. 3 - SPHAR: ECONOMY, PLACE, AND POLITICS IN THE 21st CENTURY Permission is not required - In this course we will focus on the deeply intertwined nature of economies and politics through a geographical lens, emphasizing the rootedness of both economies and politics in particular places. Even though this rootedness often seems to have lost importance with the onset of economic globalization, throughout the semester we will explore how it is in fact as important as ever. By critically analyzing the changing nature of this three-way relationship between place, politics, and economy we will better understand how economic globalization shapes and remakes our economies, our politics, our lives, and our cities. We will also explore how citizen-led projects, such as participatory budgeting in Porto Alegre, Brazil, are fostering new visions for radical democracy by rethinking this three-way relationship. Through this course students will engage with pressing issues in economic and urban geography, and be able to apply this knowledge through case study analyses of key global cities. They will learn how current debates in economic globalization shape city, state, and national politics, and be able to explain how places, policies, and economies are co-constituted through these processes.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every semester

  
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    GEOG 388 - Development Policy


    A research seminar for students with some background in development studies. After an introduction on policy and policy-making institutions, the seminar critically examines recent tendencies in development policy, particularly the policies advocated by the World Bank, IMF and WTO. The course also looks at alternative development. Open to doctoral and masters students.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    GEOG 391 - Innovations in Earth Observations


    Understanding the Earth System depends on observations of socioeconomic and environmental processes collected across multiple spatial and temporal scales, many of which cannot be addressed by existing Earth Observation (EO, or remote sensing) systems because of inherent tradeoffs between the extent, duration, frequency, and resolution of observation. In the past few years these obstacles have started to fall as new methods and technologies are introduced. This seminar will survey the key recent advances in EO, and their associated applications. A prerequisite for Geography and IDCE graduate students taking New Methods for Observing Our Changing World. Open to graduate students; advanced undergraduates may ask permission.

    Prerequisites: GEOG 383 Introduction to Remote Sensing must be completed before signing up for this course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: annually

  
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    GEOG 392 - Remote Sensing of Global Environmental Change


    Human and natural forces are profoundly altering earth’s surface and function. This graduate-level seminar investigates how satellite remote sensing is being used to monitor and understand these changes, thus addressing many of the frontier challenges in earth system science today. Specific topics will include desertification, loss of snow and ice cover, forest disturbances, fire detection, famine early warning, boreal forest migration, carbon cycle assessments, trends in hurricane intensity, coral crises, and climate variability and change. Students will read and introduce primary and popular literatures, critically evaluate specific remote sensing applications, facilitate discussions, and debate interpretations and conclusions. Open to doctoral and masters students.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year.

  
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    GEOG 394 - Dissertation Writing


    This is a variable unit, graduate course for students engaged in writing a Ph.D. Dissertation. 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    GEOG 396 - Polar Environmental Change Research


    Earth’s polar regions are particularly vulnerable to observed and projected shifts in climate and act as harbingers of global change, as these regions are poised to warm more than any other region over the next century.  This seminar focuses on recent advances in polar environmental change research, providing a system-science approach to understanding land-ocean-atmosphere-ice-human interactions at high latitudes.  Students also focus on independent research projects that can be contextualized within existing primary and cutting-edge polar science literature. Topics covered will change each semester. Open to doctoral and masters students.



     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    GEOG 397 - Advanced Raster GIS


    This course builds on Introduction to GIS by delving deeper into raster GIS. Topics include time-series analysis, uncertainty assessment, multi-objective decision making, land-change modeling, and spatial statistics. Concepts in lectures are illustrated using the Idrisi software. Final project is required. This is a prerequisite for the fifth year Masters program in GIS and is a requirement for the GISDE masters program. This is a prerequisite for the accelerated degree program (MS GIS) and is a requirement for the GISDE masters program.

    Prerequisites: GEOG 190 /GEOG 390 /IDCE 310 - Intro to Geographic Information Systems  or permission of instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every spring

  
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    GEOG 398 - Internship


    Academic experience taking place in the field with an opportunity to earn university credit. For doctoral and masters students.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: -

  
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    GEOG 399 - Directed Study


    Directed readings, discussion, and research supervision designed for doctoral students and some qdvanced qualified masters students.  Permission from instructor is required for registration

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    GEOG 1040 - Earth System Science


    An introduction to the structure and function of the earth system, with a focus on how the Earth system sustains life. Topics include the connections among the terrestrial surface, oceans, and atmosphere and how these connections create and sustain the climates and biomes of the world and provide ecosystem services.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: SP (Summer Only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    GEOG 1270 - Political Economy of Development


    Why do some people die from too much consumption yet others at the opposite corner of the world perish from poverty and starvation? Development theories try to answer fundamental questions like this. This course critically examines these development theories, including classical, neoclassical and Keynesian economies; modernization theory; dependency, Marxist and neo-Marxist and world systems theories; post-developmentalism; feminism and feminist critiques of development; and critical modernist theories. The course quickly takes students with an initial interest in development to a high level of critical understanding. Fulfills the Global Comparison perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    GEOG 1900 - Introduction to Geographic Information Science


    This course introduces Geographic Information Science (GIS) as a powerful mapping and analytical tool. Topics include GISc data structure, map projections, and fundamental GISc techniques for spatial analysis. Laboratory exercises concentrate on applying concepts presented in lectures and incorporate two widely used GISc software packages - IDRISI (created by Clarklabs) and ArcGIS (created by ESRI). These exercises include examples of GISc applications in environmental modeling, socio-demographic change and site suitability analyses. Although the course is computer-intensive, no programming background is required.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: FA (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    GERM 101 - Introductory German I


    Imparts an active command of German. Combines grammar, oral practice and readings in literary and expository prose. There are weekly conversation groups with a native German speaker and individual laboratory work.

    LP upon completin of 102

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GERM 102 - Elementary German II


    Second half of elementary German. Continues the focus on developing basic language skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. 

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: n/a

  
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    GERM 103 - Intermediate German I


    Consolidates basic skills for students who have completed GERM 102 or the equivalent. Reviews grammar, reading and discussion of selections from newspapers and magazines. Develops skills in oral and written expression. There are weekly conversation groups with a native German speaker and individual laboratory work.

    Prerequisites: GERM 102 or equivalent.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GERM 104 - Intermediate German II


    Bridges basic skills courses and advanced courses in language, literature and culture. Reviews grammar and studies literary works on themes of contemporary German culture. Develops the ability to articulate ideas and to participate in discussions in German. There are weekly conversation groups with a native German speaker as well as individual laboratory work.

    Prerequisites: GERM 103  or equivalent.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GERM 220 - Global Freud


    This course provides an introduction to Freud’s thinking, especially on literary and cultural topics. Reading his writing in conjunction with literary texts from a variety of cultural backgrounds, we will focus on the ways in which authors, artists, musicians and film makers from around the world have used Freud’s insights and try to determine in what ways his thoughts translate globally. Besides Freud’s 1909 Clark lectures, we will read his writings on Oedipus, hysteria, repression, the uncanny, melancholia, religion and civilization. Alongside these works, we will read writings by such authors of world literature as Sophocles, Hoffmann, Jelinek, Puig and Mishima.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered in Fall 2009

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GERM 230 - The German Discovery of Sex


     

     

    Few people realize that the Greek term “homo” (same) and the Latinate “sex” (sex) were first combined to describe someone with a sexual interest in members of their own sex in 1869 in the German-speaking world.  Similar observations can be made about terms such as “heterosexual,” “masochist,” and “transvestite.”  Out of this interest emerged sexologists such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing, whose Psychopathia Sexualia introduced a new vocabulary of sexuality to the entire world, homosexual activists such as Karl Ulrichs, who made arguments about sexual rights that are still prevalent in the gay community today, and Sigmund Freud, whose understanding of sexuality arguably structured much of twentieth century popular culture.  In this course, we will investigate the emergence of modern sexual discourses in the nineteenth-century German-speaking world.

     

     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: -

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GERM 250 - German Film and the Frankfurt School


    In this course, we will survey the masterpieces of German-language cinema, beginning with such expressionist works of art as Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Murnau’s Nosferatu, Lang’s Metropolis and M, and Sagan’s Mädchen in Uniform. We will also study Nazi film, particularly Leni Riefenstahl’s work. Among the postwar directors that we study will be Fassbinder, Herzog and Wenders. Queer German film-makers such as Praunheim and Treut will receive special attention. The course will conclude with recent critical and popular successes such as Run Lola Run and The Lives of Others. As a critical lens, we will rely heavily on psychoanalytic and Frankfurt School criticism, focusing on writings by Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer and Theodor Adorno. In addition to class meetings, a weekly video screening of approximately two hours is required. All discussion in English. Students taking the course for German credit will be expected to watch the films without subtitles and complete written assignments in German; students taking the course for credit in Screen Studies or Communication and Culture will generally watch films with subtitles and write in English.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Language, Literature and Culture for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GERM 286 - Germans, Jews and Turks


     

    This class studies the expression of cultural identity in central European literature. How have people in central Europe come to think of themselves or others as “Germans,” “Jews,” “Turks,” or some combinations thereof? While the Holocaust is obviously central to the German-Jewish relationship, it is not the only focus of this course-we will also study the emancipation of the Jews in the German-speaking world, German-Jewish assimilation and symbiosis, the rise of anti-Semitism and Zionism, as well as attempts to remember the Holocaust. And while the long history of the relationship between Jews and non-Jews in Germany will be a major component of our course, we will also study the emergence of Turkish culture in the German-speaking world and conclude with reflections on Germany today as a multicultural nation.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GERM 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    GES 297 - HONORS


    Readings and research for students in the honors program.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: each semester

  
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    GES 298 - Internship


    An Academic internship is a practical work experience with an academic component that enables a student to gain knowledge and skills within an organization, industry, or functional area that reflects the student’s academic and professional interests.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall/Spring

  
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    GRK 101 - Introductory Greek I


    Introduces the language of classical Greece. Covers the grammar and syntax of the Ancient Greek. Students read Ancient Greek texts including philosophical works such as Plato’s “Apology of Socrates and Crito,” and selections from Homer, Herodotus and the New Testament.

    Offered Periodically

    LP upon completion of 102 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Periodically

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    GRK 102 - Elementary Greek II


    Second half of elementary Greek. Continues the focus on developing basic language skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. 

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varied

  
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    HEBR 101 - Elementary Hebrew I


    Modern conversational Hebrew. Emphasizes speaking, reading, writing and listening skills. Acquisition of vocabulary and basic grammar. Two class meetings per week, one hour of mandatory drill sessions led by a teaching assistant and individual work in the language laboratory. HEBR 102  

    LP upon completion of 102 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HEBR 102 - Elementary Hebrew II


    This course is a continuation of HEBR 101 . Offered also for students who placed at that level during placements exams.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varied

  
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    HEBR 103 - Intermediate Hebrew I


    Modern conversational Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and listening skills. Enrichment and reinforcement of verbal expressions and grammatical structures. Two class meetings per week, one hour of mandatory drill sessions led by a teaching assistant and individual work in the language laboratory.

    Prerequisites: HEBR 102  or the equivalent required.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HEBR 104 - Intermediate-Advanced Hebrew


    Surveys significant Hebrew texts, including literature and newspapers, focusing on the Holocaust through literature. Enrichment of verbal and written expression and grammatical structures. Two class meetings per week, one hour of drill sessions, and individual work in the language laboratory.

    Prerequisites: HEBR 103  or equivalent required.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HEBR 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    HEBR 1010 - Elementary Hebrew


    Modern conversational Hebrew. Emphasizes speaking, reading, writing and listening skills. Acquisition of vocabulary and basic grammar.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    HGS 298 - Internship


    An Academic internship is a practical work experience with an academic component that enables a student to gain knowledge and skills within an organization, industry, or functional area that reflects the student’s academic and professional interests while earning credit. Maybe repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    HGS 299 - Directed Study


    Graduate students construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    HGS 397 - Doctoral Dissertation


    PhD. students work on their dissertation research under the direction of a faculty member.  Offered for variable credit.
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    HGS 399 - Directed Study


    PhD. students construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    HIST 011 - Survey of U.S. History to 1865


    This introductory course offers a survey of what is conventionally referred to as early American or United States History.  More precisely, our attention will be focused on the history of the region of North America that embarked upon the national project of the “United States” during the American Revolution of the late eighteenth century.  In essence we will examine what might be considered the formative years of the modern United States, running from the earliest seventeenth-century settlements through the solidifying of the national project during the great Civil War of the mid-nineteenth century.  Recurrent thematic concerns will include the interlocking experiences of native Americans, African-Americans, and Euro-Americans; the complicated process by which all Americans together defined and shaped a distinctive national identity and republican culture; and the ongoing challenge for Americans of arriving at a meaningful definition of individual liberty while balancing this commitment to liberty with a parallel commitment to order, community, and the public or common good.  Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 016 - American Race and Ethnicity


    Explores the influence that racial and ethnic patterns have on American history from colonial times to the present. Largely through first-hand accounts, students will explore the experiences of various ethnic and racial groups in American history. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 037 - 19th-Century America Through Women’s Eyes


    How is our understanding of the past transformed when we look at it through women’s eyes? This seminar explores the major developments of 19th-century American history industrialization, slavery, westward expansion, immigration, and reform, as captured in women’s narrative writings, diaries, letters, autobiographies and autobiographical fiction. Its goals are three-fold: to introduce students to history as a lively scholarly discipline (as opposed to a timeless and fixed story of the past); to familiarize students with the central questions of women’s history; and to train students in the reading, analysis and critique of primary sources. What will emerge at the end of our investigation is an understanding of the ways in which the experience and production of history are shaped by gender and, in turn, how the experience and production of gender are shaped by history. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 039 - The American Home: Power, Place, and Gender


    In order to underscore both the unity and diversity of nineteenth-century cultural life, this course revisits the variety of places Americans called home –middle-class suburban houses to working-class tenements, frontier dugouts to urban settlement houses–while considering the shifting interpretations of these spaces from within and without. Beginning with the rise of home as a haven from the uncertainties of public life, it traces the popular celebration of home as a moral force, notes the movement of domesticity into the public worlds of politics and reform, and concludes with a consideration of home’s relationship with and penetration by and of the marketplace. Fulfills Historial Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically.

  
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    HIST 040 - The Witchcraze: Witch Hunts in Early Modern Europe


    From 1450-1750, hundreds of thousands of people were investigated for the crime of witchcraft across Europe and North America. Tens of thousands of them, mainly women, were executed. Over the course of the era, the figure of the witch as an ally of the Devil emerged and became an indelible part of Western culture. Yet scholars doubt that very many people in this period actually practiced witchcraft, or at least did so in the ways imagined by their prosecutors. The question then is why did all of this happen? How was the figure of the witch and the practice of witchcraft constructed? Why did they engender such panic at this particular time? Why were women so often accused? Why did the hunts begin and just as important, why did they end? This course will explore the history of the witch craze in order to provide the perspective to answer these questions. In the process, we will work on developing skills essential to the study of history: How do you pull the main points, the argument, out of a reading? How do you assess that argument? What is the raw material of history and how do historians use this raw material to write history?

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year.

  
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    HIST 044 - Picking up the Gun: A History of Violence in African American Social and Political Movements


    This first year intensive course takes up the history of radicals, revolutionaries, and reformers by examining the role of violence in their struggle for democratic rights, or what some scholars now call “freedom rights”.  It explores the use of violence within movements to end slavery; it looks at the use of violence to attain political rights by women, black Americans, and other ethnic and religious minorities; it examines the advocacy of violence during movements against Jim Crow segregation and lynching; it considers how people and groups employed violence to end economic exploitation and class-based oppression; and it explores the use of violence by those who challenged state-violence, mass incarceration, detention, and police shootings.  We will approach the topic of violent resistance by reading historical documents, philosophical treatise, analyzing poetry, pouring over fiction, and viewing films.  Thus, our approach to the America’s violent past will cut across academic disciplines in order to examine the vantage point of both those who advocated (and participated in) violent actions against the government and other citizens and, those who rejected violence on principal and/or because they did not believe the use of violence to be an effective means to attain citizenship rights.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

  
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    HIST 045 - Reconsidering the Harlem Renaissance


    This first-year seminar is designed to explore the history of African American art and literature during and preceding the period commonly identified as the Harlem Renaissance. Rather than examine the Harlem Renaissance uncritically, this course is designed to reinterpret the Harlem Renaissance in a way that takes into consideration the broader movement of black activitism and creative works, reaching back to the 1880s and 1890s, that represent more accurately, perhaps, a “renaissance” of black creative achievement. Thus, students will consider the broader, more inclusive designation, “New Negro Movement,” as they examine the history of African American arts and letters both in New York and beyond.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 048 - Baseball and American Society


    This course will use the story of baseball to illuminate key themes and issues in U.S. history. These include urbanization; mass media, transportation, and culture; immigration and assimilation; race and civil rights legal issues; labor struggles; and globalization. This course will emphasize critical analysis, especially how to interpret sources, from written texts to photographs, films, cartoons, and music, and will include several field trips. HIST 048 carries an HP designation.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 055 - 9/11 in Fact and Fiction


    In the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, students at Clark and other universities across America remarked again and again that “everything is different now.” Nine years after al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center, however, many Americans question whether anything at all has changed, either at home or abroad. This first-year seminar will examine this apparent contradiction by placing the events of 9/11 into historical context. Among the questions we will explore are: Were the events of 9/11 truly unprecedented in American history? Were the American public and their leaders aware of the rising tide of Islamic extremism during the 1990s? How did al-Qaeda’s assault on America affect Arabs and other Muslims living in the United States? How have civil liberties in America more generally fared in the age of the Patriot Act? How have the events of 9/11 been depicted in literature, film, and popular cultural phenomena such as interactive video games? Each student will be expected to undertake an oral history evaluating the impact of 9/11 on his or her own family and to participate in a collaborative group project examining how the events of 9/11 affected the Clark community. The class will also take a field trip to New York City to visit Ground Zero. History 055 carries an HP designation.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 060 - American Jesus: Christianity and National Identity in US History


    The United States is one of the most religiously diverse countries in the world. It is also one of the most Christian. While church membership continues to decline in Western Europe - the home of Christian culture - American Christianity shows no sign of giving way to the temptations of secular society and the critical inroads of unbelief. The powerful notion of a “Christian America,” informed by biblical ethics and inspired by the promise of divine redemption, sits uneasily with the ideal of social pluralism and cultural modernism that characterizes the American way of life and the historical experience of many Americans. This course undertakes to explore this contradiction. Looking at the development of American Christianity from a variety of different theological, institutional and devotional perspectives, we will examine the political and cultural challenges faced by American-Christian believers and the challenges that the power of their faith continues to present to the values of their non-Christian neighbors.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    HIST 069 - Introduction to Medieval History (400-1400)


    This course provides an introduction to the history, civilization, and culture of Western Europe during the Middle Ages (ca. 400-1400), from the “fall” of Rome to the beginning of the Renaissance. By broadly exploring political, social, cultural, and economic developments of this period, we will try to answer the question of what is medieval history and ultimately determine what makes this period unique. Special attention will be devoted to the importance of the Church in shaping “the contested norms” of medieval life, the evolution of new forms of political power, the foundations of new systems of knowledge, and the workings of social and gender hierarchies. The course will focus mainly on Western Europe, but will also consider key developments in the neighboring civilizations of Byzantium and Islam, as well as the influences these civilizations brought to bare on the medieval west. We will also consider modern appropriations of medieval history, from Hollywood to White Power movements. The course will introduce students to basic skills employed by historians including how to analyze primary sources, how to identify and critique scholarly arguments, and how to develop written arguments

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-Annually

  
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    HIST 070 - Introduction to European Histor: Part I, to 1600


    Outlines developments of Western society and our collective identity. Presents historical angles–cultural, religious, political, military, economic and social–and integrates these analytical approaches into a coherent, popular narrative. The medieval period is emphasized as the root of modern history. HIST 070 and HIST 071  are parts of a whole, but either course may be taken without the other. Fulfills the historical perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 071 - Introduction to European History, Part II, Since 1600


    Same goal as HIST 070 . Covers the military revolution of the 16th century, the bureaucratic and scientific revolutions of the 17th century, the 18th-century Enlightenment, and the political, industrial, intellectual and social revolutions of the 19th and 20th centuries. HIST 070  and 071 are parts of a whole, but either course may be taken without the other. Fulfills the historical perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 080 - Introduction to Modern East Asia


    Surveys modern historical trends in China, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, and India. Through political biographies, literary selections and general histories, the course compares native traditions, colonial experiences and postcolonial developments in Asia since roughly 1800. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 081 - Modern East Asia, 1600-Present


    This course surveys the histories of the four major cultures of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam) from 1600 CE to the present.  Topics and themes to be covered include the cultural ties that bound these civilizations into a China-centered order in premodern times, Western intrusion in the 19th century, Japan’s emergence as an imperial power, colonialism in Korea and Vietnam, the battle for China, decolonization and nationalist independence movements in the postwar period, and interactions between East Asia and the world in the contemporary era.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year.

  
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    HIST 090 - Twentieth Century Global History


    This course examines events and themes in global history over the duration of the 20th century. Topics in the course will include the tension between internationalism and nationalism as seen in the rise of political ideologies like anarchism, socialism, and fascism, the process of global alignment during and after the World Wars and the Cold War, the role of social movements and the mobilization of people for societal change, the idea of the “Third World” and the challenges of decolonization and postcolonial nation building, and the meaning of “globalization.” Within these topical examinations, we consider the lived experience of history alongside the common threads that connect these experiences throughout the globe and to the challenges and opportunities facing our world today.
    Fulfills the Global Comparative Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year.

  
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    HIST 104 - Introduction to Russian History


    This introductory lecture course provides an overview of the historical development of Russian civilization from Christianization in the tenth century to the fall of the Soviet Union at the end of the twentieth. Class discussions will aim toward grounding students in the history of Russia through the analysis of a variety of primary source materials ranging from icons to government decrees to personal diaries. Issues covered in the course will include the following: the importance of geography and the natural landscape, religious and ethnic diversity, the role of authoritarian government, resistance and revolution, the relationship between the individual and community, the impact of mass literacy, education and technology and the social effects of war and imperial conquest.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 110 - Early Modern Europe


    This course is part of an integrated early modern humanities initiative and is linked with two other courses which focus on the early modern period:  ENG 180, Early American Writers, taught by Meredith Neuman, and MUSC 101, Bach and Before: Studies in Music before 1750, taught by Ben Korstvedt.  While the courses will run independently, they will each be organized around a common set of themes.  Each week the three courses will meet collectively for a supplemental 50-minute group session.  These sessions will feature presentations, performances, and discussions that connect among the three courses, deepen our investigation of our common themes, and bring other scholars and teachers from within Clark and beyond into the discussion.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 112 - African American History to 1865


    This course introduces students to the most important events and issues African Americans confronted as they struggled for equality and “freedom” in the United States prior to 1865. We will analyze and discuss the black experience using a variety of sources. Topics include the Atlantic slave trade, evolution of African American communities and culture, the free black community, the distinct experience of black women, and the antebellum black protest tradition. Through the use of class discussions, lectures, and multimedia presentations, we will learn about the diverse and complex history of African Americans.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP & DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: yearly

  
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    HIST 114 - African-American History, 1865-Present


    This course examines the history of African Americans from the Civil War to present day with special emphasis on the ways individuals and organizations challenged racial oppression. Students will examine how black Americans demonstrated a sense of agency within the context of Jim Crow segregation, employment discrimination, and disenfranchisement. Topics include Reconstruction, northern migrations, Ida B. Wells-Barnett and the Women’s Club Movement, Garveyism, Civil Rights and Black Power movements, as well as the advent of African American popular culture.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP & DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 116 - Pre-Colonial African History


    This introductory course presents a brief overview of the history of Africa and its peoples–from the earliest times to the end of the nineteenth century.  The class will introduce intellectual tools to students for them to intelligently explore key events in African history.  In the course, there will be an examination of various aspects of African life, with an emphasis on cultural, societal and demographic themes.  It explores the African past through a combination of presentations, texts (“primary” and “secondary” sources), films, arts, and music.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    HIST 118 - Revolutionary Europe, 1789-1918


    This course examines the history of Europe between the French Revolution in 1789 and the end of World War I in 1918 and the destruction of European monarchies and empires. It will cover all regional parts of Europe but focus on France, England, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, and Russia. Rather than following a chronological narrative, the course will explore specific topics and thus explain major political, social, economic and cultural transformations such as industrialization, urbanization, nation-building, imperialism, the eugenic movement, the rise of the working class and of socialism, the change of the gender order, and other. Each of them will cover one week, usually by providing a survey at the first weekly meeting and by discussing a related special aspect or a document at the second meeting of that week.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 120 - Writing History


    Introduces students to the discipline of history, with emphasis on the different types of historical writing and on the issues involved in the research and writing of historical studies.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    HIST 128 - History of Modern Israel


    This course surveys the history of modern Israel, from its roots in the Hebrew revival of the late nineteenth century to the contemporary fate and future of Jewish statehood in its immediate Middle Eastern setting. Looking at literature, journalism and historical writing, we will examine the development of the Jewish national idea as a source of social criticism, the basis for collective action and personal discipline as well as the inspiration for religious and artistic innovation. Focusing salient political events, conflicts and personalities and on the evolution of political culture in the modern Jewish state, the course will address the values, concerns and ideals that continue animate and inform the Jewish national ethos as a source of meaning for Israeli Jews at home and abroad.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered bi-annually

  
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    HIST 130 - Introduction to History of Genocide


    In this course, we will provide students with a comparative perspective that highlights both theory and concrete examples of genocide.  After surveying different approaches to genocide, we will explore different cases of mass killing that took place over the course of centuries and across several continents: 1) Genocide in early history, 2) Genocide in modern time before Holocaust - Colonial Genocide, 3) Ottoman Genocide, 4) the destruction of European Jewry during the Holocaust, 5) Yugoslavia, 6) Cambodia, 7) Africa, Great Lake Region with a focus on Rwanda Darfur and Congo.  Finally, we will discuss the problem of prevention of Genocide.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    HIST 133 - Women during the Holocaust


    The aim of this introductory level course is to familiarize students with the history of the Holocaust by analyzing the experiences of women.  Women are often viewed as the objects of history - things happen to them; they don’t make things happen.  Certainly, the application of Nazi policy, derived and carried out primarily by men inside Germany and throughout occupied Europe, falls into this category.  Nazi policy affected various groups of women in diverse ways.  But always, women crafted their lives in response to Nazi policy:  some embraced it, others rejected it outright, and many did whatever they could just to get by.  In this course, students will analyze women’s agency within varying degrees of constraint and why women’s experiences are important.  Students will read a variety of texts that explore the experiences of women as victims, perpetrators, rescuers and resisters.  Lecture/Discussion

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually Fall and/or Spring

  
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    HIST 135 - History of Armenia


    Introduces the history of Armenia from antiquity to the modern times. Examines the formation of the Armenian state as an independent entity, the role of the major powers (eg, Byzantium, Persia), and the social and political institutions under the Armenian monarchies (eg, Bagratuni, Cilicia). Covers the history of modern Armenia from the late-18th to the 20th century, including the development of modern Armenian culture and political life in Ottoman and Russian Armenia. The course examines the emergence of the Armenian national movements, the events leading to the genocide, and the creation of the Republic of Armenia, Soviet Armenia, the re-emergence of the Republic of Armenia after the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the current issues confronting the Republic.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 145 - U.S. History Through the Novel


    Introduces American history with a distinctive and unconventional approach, resting on the assumption that we can gain access to the past by reading fiction. Students learn how to approach imaginative literature from an historical perspective and to appreciate the historical insight of writers who were keen observers of aspects of the making of modern America. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 152 - Jews in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America


    Between ca. 1400 and ca. 1800, the rights of most European Jews were severely restricted. Their story can only be told if we take into account the actions and measures of “gentiles” vis-a-vis the Jews. Having established what these conditions were, we will direct our attention to Jewish cultural and religious practices. The course starts with late medieval Christian myths and stories about Jews, scapegoating mechanisms and outright persecution. The course will end with the extension of greater freedom to the Jews in the Age of Democratic Revolutions, which made the question of assimilation an important issue.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 153 - Europe in the Age of Extremes: the 20th Century


    This course serves as an introduction into the political, social and cultural history of Europe from the beginning to the end of the 20th century. The survey is concerned with World War I and World War II, and with the nature of postwar stabilization and recovery. It focuses on the rise of dictatorships and the radicalization of mass violence during the first half of the century, as well as on the developments toward democracy, peace and civil society since 1950. The course will conclude with an evaluation of the remaking of Eastern and Western Europe in the 1980s and 1990s, the return of war and genocide to Europe, and present debates on the future of Europe.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 162 - The History of the Modern Middle East 1800 -1925


    The collapse of the Soviet Union, the Arab Spring and Syrian Civil War have rocked the political landscape in the world and the Middle East. Today’s nation-states and their boundaries in the region are in question and new nation-states are seeming to emerge. Contours of the region were first shaped by World War I and the Sykes-Picot Agreement of 1916 which dismantled the Ottoman Empire some hundred years ago. This is a crucial point in the history of the region - one that continues to affect it to this day. This course will explore the history of the Middle East from the decline of the Ottoman Empire (early 19th century) until 1925. Major themes include the emergence of revolutionary nationalism among Armenians, Arabs, Kurds and Turks before and after World War I, massacres, ethnic cleansings and genocides against various people of the region; as well as the rise of Zionism and the ensuing Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and the emergence of different nation-states in the region. The parameters that were set up in the 1920’s are the origin of today’s problems. Without understanding this period, we cannot understand the Middle East of today.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically.

  
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    HIST 163 - A History of Immigration in the U.S.


    Most current political debates surrounding immigration and the role of immigrants in U.S. society have largely focused on the very recent past. This course will attempt to equip students to understand the genesis of such debates, including ideological, economic, and social factors, by exploring the history of immigration in what is now the United States. We will begin with an examination of early settler colonialism, then European immigration, and finally nineteenth and twentieth- century legislative efforts to restrict or shape immigration patterns. Alongside a clear delineation of legislative and policy efforts, the course will likewise consider the ways in which immigrants and immigration have been viewed in popular culture such as movies and music. Using these and other primary source documents, students will analyze the ways in which ideas about progress, modernity, civilization, racialized constructions of the “other,” national identity, and social engineering affect and inform experiences of immigration not only for immigrants themselves but for native citizenry as well. 

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

  
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    HIST 164 - History of Nationalism: Europe and Beyond


    The nation is one of the most powerful social ideas of the modern era.  But what are the nations?  Are they the eternally constant, fixed entities we often imagine them to be?  This course accepts as its point of departure the proposition that nations are not fixed, but rather the contingent and fluid product off specific historical developments in the modern era.  The goal is thus to analyze the rise of nations and the rapid spread of nationalist ideologies that espoused them.  Particular attention will be given to the historical construction of constitutive components of nationalism, including the political limits of the nation, as well as arguments on ethnic and civic parameters.  Instead of focusing on a specific region or chronological period, this course will pursue three goals organized around the common theme of nationalism: First, students will develop a satisfactory definition of “nations” and “nationalism.” Second, they will receive an overview of the historiography of nationalism that introduces relevant theoretical issues and historical debates. Third, it will allow students a glimpse into the processes and phenomena that have shaped modern history from a broader trans-national and even global perspective. Although our “case studies” will mostly cover the European continent, the global context of nationalism will become a primary focus during the final weeks of the course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    HIST 165 - Nazi Germany and the Holocaust


    Introduces students to the rise, the fabric, and the fall of the “Third Reich.” It starts with an investigation in how the Nazis came into power and why the first German democracy failed. The course then focuses on two related issues. Both are revolving around the success and the impact of Nazi politics in Germany and in Europe: How could Hitler and the Nazi Party establish its power in a country which was seen as a heart of Western culture? And: Why did so few Germans oppose Hitler and his racially based, terrorist regime?

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 175 - Holocaust: Agency and Action


    This course is an introductory, gateway course to the history of the Holocaust. It aims to provide a foundation for more specialized seminars and lecture courses in this field (many of which are offered by the History Department), and is required for the concentration in Holocaust and genocide studies. The Holocaust was not a natural disaster, nor is history predetermined. Looking at a range of people, from national leaders to army generals to local religious figures to student activists, to victims, we will examine the choices they confronted and the actions they took. This course spans many centuries and covers the continent of Europe. Our primary focus, however, is the National Socialist era and the Holocaust.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 181 - Chinese Civilization


    Focuses on Chinese life, institutions and culture from the earliest times through the mid-19th century. Creative literature, philosophical writings and selected primary documents supplement information presented in interpretive texts and lectures. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 182 - Modern China


    Introduces events, personalities and concepts of importance for understanding China’s history from the early-19th century to the present. Readings that present the Chinese view of events supplement interpretative studies by Western scholars. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP, DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 185 - The Russian Revolution, 1890-1938


    In the twentieth century, the Russian Revolution shook the world; the reverberations of the cataclysm of 1917 continue to be felt in our own time. What were the roots of the political, cultural, social and economic crisis that brought the Russian monarchy to an end and swept the party known as the Bolsheviks into power? Who were the Bolsheviks? What did they want? How did popular conceptions of direct democracy evolve into a dictatorship and why did so many revolutionaries end up as victims of the system they created? How did the new state mobilize the conscience of so many people, including the members of different national and religious communities? Looking at the long history of 1917 from a variety of perspectives – including that of the leaders, as well as those of ordinary men and women, soldiers, peasants, intellectuals and artists – this course will examine the breathtaking events that radically transformed the fate of the world’s largest country from the end of the tsarist empire to the creation of the Soviet Union. Course assignments will include Boris Pasternak’s master-novel of the revolution, DR.ZHIVAGO(to be read over the course of the entire semester) as well as very short (1-5 pp.) weekly readings drawn from primary sources in translation. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered biannually

  
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    HIST 191 - Pirates and Smugglers in the Atlantic World


    This course examines piracy and its cousin, privateering - - vital weapons of the latecomers in the Atlantic world. The French, English, and Dutch relentlessly targeted Iberian ships, hoping to harm the enemy and receive a share of the riches shipped from the New World. Privateering was also successfully practiced by the Barbary states of North Africa, which captured many European ships and enslaved their crews. In Atlantic waters, especially the Caribbean, the scope for both piracy and smuggling was much wider than in Europe. Even more pervasive than piracy, smuggling was initially an alternative way for the northern Europeans to get hold of American crops and precious metals. Eventually, it gave rise to a distinct way of life in vast parts of the Americas.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered biannually

  
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    HIST 201 - Era of the American Revolution


    Studies the origins, character and consequences of the American Revolution, from the erosion of imperial authority in the 1760s and 1770s to the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Emphasizes relation of ideology and political ideas to social development.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 202 - The Early American Republic


    Studies formation and testing of the early United States from the adoption of the Constitution through the Jacksonian era. Emphasizes ideology, public policy and the problem of national integration during an age of extraordinary territorial and economic expansion.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 204 - Special Topics in American History


    Content varies with the interest of the instructor. This course explores the way that race and ethnicity was “made” and “unmade” over the course of the nineteenth century and the consequences of those constructions.  This seminar aims to expose you to the variety of ways that historians have approcahed this topic.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 205 - Renaissance and Reformation


    Charts the course of European history from ca.1300 to 1600. Reviews the devastation caused by the plague and examines the rise of the city-states in Italy. Deals with successful reformers (Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin), as well as the more short-lived radical currents such as the Anabaptists of Munster, who declared property to be in common, outlawed the use of money, and made polygamy compulsory. The course will also introduce the Spanish Inquisition and discuss everyday violence between Calvinists and Catholics in France.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 209 - Marriage & the Meanings of America


    Often viewed as a personal decision, marriage is also a public act and institution. Marriage resides at the nexus of private life and community authority. It is simultaneously an emotional and economic arrangement tied to the production of value and the reproduction of the family. More than only a rite, marriage is a right capable of conferring other rights and societal benefits while policing the boundaries of gender, race, and citizenship. This course explores important themes in and approaches to the history of marriage in the United States from the 18th century to the present through an examination of recent scholarship and primary source material. 

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: In rotation with other advanced seminars

  
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    HIST 210 - Research Seminar


    Spring 2016 Topic:  American Race & Ethnicity in the 19th Century


    This course invites students to undertake the study of 19th Century American Race & Ethnicity by designing individual research projects on a specific topic in the field. The emphasis of the course will be on that individual work within a classroom community with considerable attention paid to the research process and the fostering of productive and respectful critique.
     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 211 - American Consumer Culture


    Investigates the nature and meaning of the consumer experience in American history. Draws upon studies of advertising, domestic life and urban institutions, and examines the varied ways in which historians have defined and interpreted the importance of consumption within American life. Introduces students to the process of primary historical research.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 212 - History of Sexuality: 1750 to the Present


    Covers the history of sexuality from the Enlightenment to the present focusing on Western Europe. Students will examine how different societies in different times determined what was licit and what was illicit sexual behavior. Considers the efforts of governments, religious bodies, moralists, the medical profession and interest groups to regulate, repress or indeed encourage certain behaviors and attitudes. Specific topics include marriage, prostitution, birth control, the emergence of homosexual subcultures, and sexuality as identity.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 213 - Gender and the American City


    This course considers how the experiences and spaces of nineteenth-century urban life were shaped by and, in turn, shaped gendered assumptions about men and women.  How did men and women experience the city differently?  What aspects of urban life defined or reinforced gender differences?  Did city life create opportunities to transform gender roles? How did city dwellers use their gendered values and concerns to shape the city through reform, leisure, or work?  Specific topics for discussion will include: gendered spaces in the city, the symbolic role of gender in the urban landscape, the interaction of sexual and racial identities with the city’s gendered terrain, and the place of gender in urban leisure and cultural institutions.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 214 - The American Civil War


    Examines events and trends precipitating the single greatest crisis in American history, the Civil War of 1861-65. Includes consideration of the behavior and experience of Americans during the war itself.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 215 - The Age of Lincoln


    This seminar will focus on an extraordinary individual and his times.  In terms of his personal character, his public vision, and his influence on American history, Abraham Lincoln deserves our closest scrutiny.  Put simply, had he never lived and acted as he did, our world today would surely be quite different.  As we attempt to take the measure of this man and his lasting significance, we will place appropriate emphasis on biography, and on the relationship between the private and the public in Lincoln’s life and career.

    Our attention will hardly be limited to this single individual, however, since any informed assessment of Lincoln must place him firmly in a number of relevant and precise historical contexts.  To this extent we will also be using our focus on Lincoln as a vehicle for understanding better the distinctive shape and character-and hence the central problems and concerns–of American society, culture, and politics from approximately 1815 through the Civil War.  Given Lincoln’s significance to the single greatest crisis in American national history, our ultimate focus will be on the legacy of the Founding Fathers, the crisis of the Union, and the ensuing war for American nationality.  And given the timeless moral issues at stake in that national project, we will surely want to engage even larger concerns and questions.  What is the relationship between private character and public leadership?  Can politics and morality, especially in the context of war, be effectively conjoined?  What constitutes responsible leadership in a democracy?  Can Lincoln’s leadership enlighten and even inspire Americans (and others) in the twenty-first century as we confront our own challenges and crises?

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 216 - Special Topics: African American Internationalism


    Content and topics vary with instructor’s interests.  FALL 2017 topic is African-American Internationalism.

    This course explores the history of African American activism within an international context. Moreover, it attempts to explain how black Americans approached their struggle for equality from a transnational perspective by linking their activism within the United States with the global struggle against modern race-based inequality rooted in human bondage, land confiscation, and colonialism.  Without force of arms, political power, or financial means, African American activists, intellectuals, and spokespersons agitated for national and international governments to live up to enlightenment ideals woven into the fabric of national creeds and national identities.    May be repeatable for credit.

     

    Prerequisites: Jrs/Srs only

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 217 - Reconstruction: America after the Civil War, 1865-1877


    Examines American history in the post-Civil War period, from 1865 to 1877, a period of national redefinition and political and social experimentation. Explores how Americans struggled with the consequences of the Civil War and emancipation. Grounds students in the historical literature of the Reconstruction era while emphasizing original student research in local sources.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 218 - London and Paris: the Making of the Modern City


    London and Paris are two of the great cities of the world.  This class will explore the foundation and development of these capitals as they grew from small medieval centers to the vast metropolises that they are today.  We will consider major events (the Black Death, the Reformation, the French Revolution, the World Wars); the development of urban culture and politics; and the everyday life of ordinary Londoners and Parisians.  You will hear from writers from Geoffrey Chaucer to Gertrude Stein; you will see works of art from Abbot Suger to Banksy; you will hear music from Gregorian chant to the Clash.  From the London Bridge to the Eiffel Tower, from Notre Dame to the London Eye, we will explore the making of the modern city through the stories and perspectives of these great cities. 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

  
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    HIST 219 - History of American Women


    This course moves through the chronology of American history to examine the broad themes that have shaped women’s lives in the United States from the colonial period to the present. While tracing larger trends and identifying common experiences, we will also pay close attention to the specific experiences of individual women in order to shed light on the differences and divisions among them. Throughout, we will investigate the ways in which notions of gender difference have changed over time and how a wide variety of women both created and responded to shifting and contested cultural, political, and social roles.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    HIST 222 - History of the American South


    Explores the history of the South from the colonial period to the present, focusing on how the South developed as a distinctive region of the United States. Examines development of slavery; impact of slavery on the economy, politics and culture of the South; race, class and gender in the Old and New South; myth and reality of the New South; the South in the 20th century.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 223 - The Civil Rights Movement


    Examines roots and evolution of the civil-rights movement from the 1930s to the present. Includes civil rights as a grassroots movement; the New Deal, World War II and civil rights; emergence of Martin Luther King; women and the civil-rights movement; black power; the disintegration of the movement; the meaning of civil rights today.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    HIST 224 - Russian Visual Culture


    Eisenstein, Malevich, Chagall. Every movie buff and every student of modern art is familiar with these Russian names and their contribution to the great twentieth-century upheaval in visual culture that transformed the way we look at images today. How did Russia–which had no tradition of painting comparable to Italy and France–come to be associated with radical innovation in painting, photography, film, book illustration, and lithography? This course examines the history of Russian visual culture against the background of Russian history. We will discuss the role that images play in Russian Orthodoxy; the impact of Western regimes of representation on the native tradition of image making; the secularization of painting in the nineteenth century and the search for authenticity in pictorial styles; the role of revolutionary politics and Bolshevik ideology in the creation of still and moving images; the connection between the avant-garde theory of world creation and totalitarian art; and, finally, the emergence of non-conformist art in late Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, and its relationship to post-modernism.

  
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    HIST 226 - Comparative Colonialism


    Seeks to examine the ways in which Spanish, Dutch and English societies evolved in the New World from 1492 to 1824. Topics include the motives and backgrounds of settlers, encounters with natives, syncretism, the search for crops and precious metals, contacts with the mother countries, the contributions of Africans, and the revolutions that made an end to the mainland empires.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 228 - Early Modern Britain


    This course will cover the major political, economic, cultural, social, religious and intellectual developments in Britain from rise of the Tudor dynasty in the fifteenth century through the eighteenth century, at which time the British Empire dominated world politics. We will pay particular attention to the emergence of modern monarchy, the Protestant Reformations, the English Civil War, the Financial Revolution, and the beginnings of empire. We will examine how the four nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland came to be Britain and how a British identity emerged. We will also examine the relationships between major events and shifts in English society and culture, including the changing roles of women, the increasing dominance of the middle class and its affect on elite society and culture.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 230 - The Topics in Armenian Genocide


    The course will discuss some of the distinctive features of the Armenian Genocide and compare it with other genocides.  Some of the topics will be reviewed are the following: the origin of the Armenian “question”; Armenian reform attempts in 1894-96 and 1909 and its relation to genocide of 1915-7; Great Power policies during the Genocide - concentrating especially on German and American policies; question of humanitarian intervention and humanitarian relief efforts during Genocide; the experience of concentration camps during the Armenian genocide in comparison with other cases; Armenian Revolutionary Movements - their importance during the genocidal process; gender and the Armenian Genocide (especially the policies towards women and children and the question of orphans); resistance and the genocide; the legal process of economic plunder and confiscation of Armenian properties; the American response to Armenian Genocide in the post-genocidal period and finally the denial of genocide by successive Turkish governments and society and the question of Turkish-Armenian reconciliation are some of these topics that we will finish off the course with. Each case will be discussed in a comparative perspective. Throughout the course we also cover some of the current debates in the field such as the debate around “Captain Torossian” (an Armenian soldier in the Ottoman Army and his memoirs).

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 231 - Origins of Modern America, 1877-1914 (formerly America in the Gilded Age)


    Focuses on a especially volatile era, encompassing Gilded Age excess and Progressive Era reforms, that gave birth to modern America. Among the many topics explored are the nation’s emergence as a world power, the rise of industrial capitalism, immigration, urbanization, Populism, popular culture, and trans-Atlantic reform movements.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    HIST 232 - Judaism and the Origins of Christianity


    Most people think of Christianity as having descended from Judaism.  In this course, we will see that what we know as Judaism and Christianity both claimed ownership of the same textual tradition.  Both developed within the same political and religious landscape of the eastern Mediterranean in the first century CE and both drew heavily on contemporary Greek philosophy and literature.  Through close readings of the  principal sources of Christian literature, such as Paul’s letters to the first communities of Christian believers and the Gospel accounts of the life and death of Jesus, we will examine how Christianity first came to claim the title of  “New Israel” and how its controversial messianic interpretation of ancient Israelite prophecy shaped the evolution of rabbinic Judaism.  Focusing on the historical context of the  original  Jewish-Christian rivalry, we will see how their momentous split continues to shape our own social commitments, perceptions of divine and human justice, and attitudes toward family, community and self.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

  
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    HIST 233 - Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism: Intellectual History of China


    Explores the three major intellectual traditions of China, with special emphasis on the ethical values of each tradition and their historical and contemporary relevance. Fulfills the Values Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year.

 

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