2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
    Dec 01, 2022  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
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    ACCT 1010 - Principles of Accounting


    Provides a basic understanding of financial accounting. Students will gain an understanding of accounting principles and procedures. The valuation of assets and liabilities as well as recognition of income and expenses will be examined. Through this study the student will be able to communicate the financial position of the organization.

  
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    ACCT 4100 - Foundations of Accounting


    Managers use accounting information to measure and evaluate organizational performance and to make decisions. This first graduate course introduces accounting, the language of business, by focusing on conceptual framework of accounting. Topics include the accounting model, processing of accounting information, preparation, use, and analysis of financial statements, and decision-making using accounting information. The course assumes no prior accounting knowledge.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall and Spring semesters

  
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    ACCT 4101 - Foundations of Financial Accounting


    This course presents a comprehensive introduction to financial accounting concepts, generally accepted accounting principles, and the accounting framework. The course begins with an orientation to the basic financial statements and the accounting information system that records activities and transactions that are reflected in the statements. This course is intended for those who want to pursue more advanced accounting courses and/or a career in accounting and therefore it takes a preparer perspective. An emphasis is placed on proper recording, and financial statement creation and analysis. The major categories of the income statement and balance sheet are covered as is the Statement of Cash Flows.

    Note: This course will satisfy the core accounting requirement for MBA students and the Foundation Course requirement for the MSA program.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall and Spring semesters

  
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    ACCT 5101 - Financial Accounting and Reporting I


    This course is the first of two graduate level courses in intermediate financial accounting and reporting. The goal of this course is to help students appreciate the strengths, and limitations of generally accepted accounting principles.  This course begins with an overview of the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting theory and standards, a review of the accounting cycle, and thorough study of the required financial statements.  A significant portion of the course is devoted to comprehensive treatment of the asset side of the balance sheet. The course also covers International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and highlights the differences between IFRS and US GAAP.

     

     

    Prerequisites: ACCT 4101  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5102 - Financial Accounting and Reporting II


    This is the second graduate level courses in intermediate financial accounting and reporting.  This course follows ACCT 5101 and includes comprehensive treatments of liability and shareholders’ equity accounts from the balance sheet. The course covers accounting for income taxes, time-value of money, pensions and postretirement benefits, leases, derivatives, accounting for changes and errors, and financial statement disclosures. The course also covers International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and highlights the differences between IFRS and US GAAP.

     

     

    Prerequisites: ACCT 5101  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5103 - Management Accounting


    The course emphasizes accounting from the management perspective. It examines cost measurement issues and discusses how managers use accounting data for their decision making. Topics include: job-order costing, process costing, activity-based costing, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, variable costing, budgeting, standard costing, segment reporting, and relevant costs for decision making.

     

    Prerequisites:

     ACCT 4101 , or waiver.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5104 - Accounting Information Systems


    Accountants need thorough knowledge of computer-based information systems and their role in accounting and finance functions and in managerial decision-making. In addition, this course also covers use of information systems in design and execution of financial and internal audits.  It also deals with the nature and flows of accounting information in various processes and organizations, information security, ramifications of Sarbanes-Oxley act, challenges of rapid changes in information technology. Students will work with data collection and management software.

     

     

    Prerequisites:

     ACCT 4101 , or waiver.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5105 - Financial and Operational Auditing


    This course covers fundamental aspects of financial auditing including management’s responsibility for financial statements, the legal liability of auditors, evaluation of internal control structures, substantive tests and tests of systems and audit reports. Operational auditing and current developments in environmental auditing are also covered.

    Note: Students can have completed the co-requisite in a previous semester, or take it at the same time as this course.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 5101  

    Corequisites: ACCT 5102  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5107 - Analysis of Financial Statements


    The course is designed to develop understanding, techniques, and skills necessary to analyze annual reports and 10-K filings of business entities, and develop critical assessment of their financial conditions. The course provides thorough understanding of the U. S. accounting standards, and nuances of their use in practice. Students learn different analytical techniques and complete a major project based on concepts and methods studied in the course.


     

    Prerequisites: ACCT 4100 ACCT 4101 , or waiver.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5109 - Government and Nonprofit Accounting


    The first half of the course focuses on government accounting standards as promulgated by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). We explore fund accounting, special issues in government budgeting and preparation of government financial statements. The second half of the course deals with accounting issues associated with nonprofit health and welfare organizations, colleges and universities, health-care organizations, and other nonprofit organizations.

    Note: Students can have completed the co-requisite in a previous semester, or take it at the same time as this course.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 5101  

    Corequisites: ACCT 5102  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5206 - Federal Taxation


    This course covers the fundamentals of individual and corporate taxation including an analysis of tax policy, structure, legal hierarchy and procedure, as well as a discussion of tax aspects of the various common forms of business organizations, and an examination of tax considerations in implementing employee benefit plans. The basic foundations of international tax are addressed. Cases emphasize the necessity of considering the impact of federal taxes in management decisions. Students perform tax compliance and planning project.

    Formerly titled “Tax strategies and Management decisions”
     

    Prerequisites:

     , ACCT 4101 , or waiver.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5210 - Advanced Accounting


    This course explores advanced complex topics in financial accounting including accounting for mergers & acquisitions, liquidations, investments, and partnerships. Topics include accounting for business combinations with a focus on consolidated financial statements of parents, subsidiaries and variable interest entities. International issues are also explored including foreign currency transactions and International Financial Reporting Standards.

     

    Prerequisites:

      and   

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ACCT 5900 - Special Topics in Accounting


    Each year, the Graduate School of Management offers courses under the “special topics” category. These courses are often different each semester and can be either .5 or one unit courses. For descriptions of current special topics courses, please see the Course Descriptions page on GSOM’s website.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    ACCT 5910 - Directed Research


    For a directed research course, a student and professor design a self-study course based around a common research interest shared by both. A directed research must be approved by the professor and the Associate Dean of GSOM. It can be designed as either a 0.5 unit or 1 unit course. The Directed Research Course Request Form should be completed and submitted to Associate Dean Andrea Aiello (aaiello@clarku.edu). For questions or additional information, contact your academic advisor. This directed research is done in the subject area of accounting.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    AFRC 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic (in an area not covered in regular courses) approved and directed by a faculty member.  Offered for variable credit.

    May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ART 1010 - Basic Drawing


    Introduces students to basic drawing concepts such as: line, volume, shape, perspective, value and composition. There will be a strong emphasis on observational methods to learn these basic concepts. Requires no previous experience. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: -

  
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    ART 1030 - Introduction to Photography


    Introduces students to the medium of photography as an art form and means of communication. The zone system, camera functions, composition and printing are covered in detail. Class discussion on contemporary and historical views of photography are encouraged. In this studio/laboratory course, students are in the darkroom developing black and white film and printing archival fiberbase silver prints. By course completion, students produce a fine small portfolio of prints. Must have 35 mm camera capable of manual settings. Material fee: $50.00.
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ART 1080 - Techniques of Ceramics


    Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, sculptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ART 1140 - Clay and Fiber


    Explores the historical, traditional and contemporary artistic applications of these two plastic mediums. Students will gain a working knowledge of traditional and experimental ceramic and fiber techniques. Design quality will be stressed throughout as a fundamental aspect of good craftsmanship. Students will gain an understanding of the artistic heritage inherent in crafts of the past and present. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ART 1160 - Introduction to Digital Photography


    Designed to work artistically within a computer-mediated environment, this course is intended as a venue for discussing the history, current practices and social value of technology-based creativity in the field of photography. You will learn to use the digital camera, Adobe Photoshop, scanners and printers to complete the digital workflow. Students must have a digital camera and a digital SLR is strongly suggested. Material fee: $100.00.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ART 1230 - Motion Graphics


    This course provides students with a foundation in the basic principles of motion graphics. Students will explore optical phenomena, visual narrative, and a different means of technical production through projects that cultivate a heightened sensitivity toward time-based media in a graphic design context.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ART 1500 - Landscape Up Close: A Study of Natural Form


    The focus of this course is to expand our observational powers and our conceptual abilities through drawing from organic forms such as rocks, roots, bones, vegetables, seashells, plants, and trees. Discussion of visual qualities found in the forms such as shape, line, surface texture and three-dimensional structure will expand your drawing concepts and abilities through the use of conte, ink, and pencil, alone and in combination. Additional media such as collage, off-press printmaking and relief will be included to expand your drawing vobcabulary. Works by artists such as Van Gogh, Mondrian, Ellsworth Kelly, Jean Dubuffet, Jennifer Bartlett, Sylvia Plimack Mangold and Joseph Stella will be studied. Some previous drawing experience helpful.

  
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    ART 1530 - Introduction to Watercolor


    Students will become acquainted with the many techniques of watercolor through demonstration, exercises and instruction. Color theory and applications will be stressed. Through individual problem solving, the creation of luminous paintings in abstract, illustration, still life and landscape will be our goal. Open to novice as well as advanced students. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ART 1570 - Art of America’s First Peoples


    An overview of the visual traditions of the Native Peoples of North America focusing on major cultural divisions, characteristic art forms and lifestyles: Woodlands, Plains, Southwest, Northwest Coast, California and Inuit. The course covers ancient traditions, the historic period and contemporary trends.

  
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    ART 1670 - African, Oceanic and Native American Art


    Focuses on the Art of the Yoruba of Southwestern Nigeria, the Northwest Coast Native Americans, and the Asmat, Abelam, and Highland Peoples of New Guinea, and considers the art forms, cultural settings, and the articulation of their distinctive ways of looking at the world. Students will be expected to make aesthetic and stylistic judgments concerning selected original material.

  
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    ART 1780 - Essentials of Modern Art


    In this course we will focus on demystifying the all too often intimidating and misunderstood art of the 20th century and making it rather palatable and quite easy to approach. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary cultural trends, the course then explores the roots of these trends by turning to the Modernist period. After some training in ‘aesthetic scanning’, a method for looking at writing about and discussing art, students will have the opportunity to study the connections with the major artistic movements from Impressionism through Post-Modern performance, informational, word, installation, and street art.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ART 2000 - Photography Projects


    An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Introductory and Intermediate Photography.

     

    Prerequisites: Introductory and Intermediate Photography.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ART 2100 - Intermediate Photography Projects


    An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Photography Projects.

    Prerequisites: Photography Projects

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ART 2120 - Drawing Extended-Works On Paper


    Concentrating on more expressive use of drawing materials we will work with both observation and imagination with consideration of composition and scale. More complex objects will be drawn from and include the use of color and wet media. Standard drawing materials will be augmented with the inclusion of collage, montage, monotype and “accidental” effects”. Demonstrations and discussions of artists’ works will expand our approach to drawing in expressing our dreams and visions. Previous drawing experience is necessary. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ART 2130 - Landscape Issues


    The grounds on campus and in surrounding areas will serve as material for studying issues in landscape drawing and composition. Issues such as color and the illusion of 3-dimensional space, the role of pespective, light and shade and the structure of landscape objects will be addressed with a variety of media. Working both indoors and out we will create compositions of both observed and imagined landscapes. The work of artists such as Van Gogh, Cezanne and John Singer Sargent will be studied to aid in the creation of our works. This course is best for those who have had some drawing or design experience.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ART 2200 - Advanced Photography Projects


    An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography Projects.

    Prerequisites: Intermediate Photography Projects

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ARTH 010 - From the Stone Age to Our Age: Monuments and Masterpieces of Western Art


    Begins with a reach back in time to the dawn of history 20,000 years ago when the earliest creators in the western world painted powerful images of animals on walls located in the eerie, dank depths of cave interiors. This startling act marked the beginning of communication through visual images. We will move chronologically through history, exploring the major monuments and masterpieces of painting, sculpture and architecture, and the cultures that produced them. By focusing primarily, although not exclusively, on select key monuments-the Pyramids, the Parthenon, the Pantheon-and on the masterpieces of major artists-Raphael, Rembrandt, Renoir, Rothko (among others)-from prehistoric times to our own computer age, we will gain an understanding of visual culture and of the needs and aspirations that are expressed.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other semester

  
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    ARTH 105 - The Aegean World


    An introduction to the architecture, sculpture and painting of Egypt and the Aegean during the Bronze Age. The course covers the Old and New Kingdoms of Egypt, Crete, and mainland Greece. Examines artistic forms and traditions of each region in order to shed light on the individual religious and social contexts in which they evolved. Highlights the archaeologists whose discoveries have illuminated the history and artifacts of these lands. Field trips to area museums.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 106 - Introduction to Archaeology


    Concentrates on the Mediterranean region, tracing the history and methods of archaeology-emphasizing its unique combination of the sciences and the humanities-from its first steps to its technologically advanced state today. Selected case studies will demonstrate how archaeology has illuminated the ancient world. Also examines the newly developed field of underwater archaeology.

     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 109 - Greek Myth and the Classical Ideal in Art


    Investigates selected Greek myths and the concept of the “Classical ideal” as expressed in art, both in ancient Greece and in various later periods, including the 20th century. Approaches the myths from the standpoint of origin and significance, changing modes of representation and manipulation for political purposes. The “Classical ideal” is also examined both as it originally developed and as it was conceived in subsequent ages. The course also considers the changing attitudes towards the classical world and the significance of the classical tradition in art and history. Field trips to area museums.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 110 - Ancient Greek Art


    This intensive survey reviews Greek art from the collapse of the Minoan-Mycenaean world in the 12th century B.C. to the close of the Hellenistic period in the first-century B.C. Geographically, it reaches from Greece, westward to the Greek cities of South Italy and Sicily and eastward to the Hellenized lands of Asia Minor, Egypt and the Near East. The course discusses the concept of artistic originality and stylistic development, the relationship between art and politics and the contribution of Greek art to the history of the visual arts in the Western world. Field trips to the Worcester Art Museum and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 111 - Roman Art and Architecture


    This course is a survey of the art and architecture of the Roman world, with a diachronic focus on developments in visual and material culture including building projects, painting, mosaics, ceramic, metalworking, and other crafts. It will cover the history of Roman art and architecture from its humble beginnings in 8th century BCE Italy, to its height in the 2nd century CE, and culminate in the 4th century CE with the reign of Emperor Constantine. We will be attentive to how visual and material can be a window into social, political, and economic developments in the Roman Republican and Imperial Periods, as well as what it can tell us about how people of various social and economic backgrounds lived their daily lives and contributed to the development of Roman society. In addition, the course will encourage students to consider the legacy of ancient Roman art and architecture in the modern world, as well as issues and controversies surrounding the recovery, curation, ownership, and interpretation of particular artifacts, buildings, and sites.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    ARTH 114 - Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries


    Introduces the great urban and religious centers of the ancient world. The course examines the concept of the city as it first evolved in the Near East and as it developed in classical Greece and Rome. The course emphasizes both the design and structure of urban spaces and the factors affecting town planning. Discusses ancient sanctuaries not only as areas of religious worship, but also as centers of cultural activity involving theater, art, athletics and politics. Cities and sanctuaries are viewed in their historical setting as part of the larger civilizations, that nurtured them.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 118 - Art in the Age of Alexander the Great


    By his death in 323 B.C., at age 33, Alexander the Great had conquered most of the known world, his empire stretching from Greece to the Indus River Valley of India. In the process, he transformed this region into a polyglot, multicultural mix that has been compared to the global village in which we live today. This course examines the life and times of Alexander and his followers through the record of the material culture they left behind: architecture, sculpture, painting, gold, coins, jewelry and everyday artifacts. It specifically examines how culture is shaped by such material goods and uses an historical perspective to gain insight to the ever-changing profile of our society today. Trips to area museums.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 121 - Introduction to Gothic Art


    A survey of the Gothic art and architecture produced in northern Europe between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries. The course investigates all aspects of artistic production on the Gothic cathedral, from its stone vaulting sustained by flying buttresses and the elaborate carvings on the exterior, to the vibrant stained glass windows, rich metalwork, textiles and illuminated manuscripts adorning the interior. Focus will be on key French monuments of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, including Saint-Denis, Laon, Notre-Dame of Paris, Chartres, Bourges, Reims, Amiens and the Sainte-Chapelle. In addition to providing an introduction to Gothic architecture and art, the course also places the cathedrals in a broader cultural context. We will analyze the relationship of a community to its church in economic, social, and spiritual terms, even as we pay particular attention to the representation of marginalized groups such as Jews and women.  Field trips to area museums allow first-hand study of Gothic objects.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall 2015

  
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    ARTH 124 - Italian Art from Giotto to Botticelli


    Examines one of the most crucial periods in Western art, the Early Renaissance in Italy. Investigates painting, sculpture and architecture in their cultural and historical contexts from the trecento (1300s) to the late quattrocento (1400s), with a focus on Tuscany and its flourishing capital, Florence. Explores the movement away from Byzantine and Gothic art toward a new, uniquely Italian style emphasizing humanity, realism and science. Assesses how humanist studies, republican politics, monastic reform and the emergence of a wealthy mercantile class affected artistic style and theory. Considers artists‚ growing self-awareness as professionals contributing to contemporary intellectual developments and the ideology of genius. Artists highlighted in this course include Giotto, Brunelleschi, Donatello, Alberti, Mantegna, Piero della Francesca and Botticelli. Field trips to area museums.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 125 - Art in the Age of Michelangelo


    Focuses on the art of the 1500s in Italy, an era comprising the High Renaissance and Mannerism, perhaps the single most influential period in Western art after classical times. Investigates painting, sculpture and architecture in the major Italian cultural centers of Florence, Rome, Milan, Parma, Mantua and Venice. Considers questions of style, influence, patronage, art theory and scholarly and religious developments. Highlights the work of Michelangelo, including the recently restored Sistine Chapel frescoes, the Medici Tombs, the David and the Pietà. Also considers the work of Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Correggio, Giorgione and Titian, and their relationship to Michelangelo and his legacy. Looks at the rise of papal Rome and the building of St. Peter’s basilica and the Vatican palaces. Field trips to area museums.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 131 - Baroque Art in the Age of Bernini


    Considers European art and architecture from around 1580 to 1680, the age known as the Baroque. An era of astonishing artistic activity, it was marked by lavish patronage by popes, cardinals and princes, centering on the cosmopolitan capital of Rome. This period was characterized by fundamental changes in society, a re-examining of religious imagery and orthodoxy, new and revolutionary scientific discoveries, a new global awareness and the growth of political absolutism. Explores how these developments informed the style, iconography and patronage of art. Analyzes works by some of the best-known “Old Masters,” including Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio, Rubens, and Rembrandt. Topics include developments in optics and drama, the rise of landscape painting, still life and genre painting, as well as the concept of the Baroque unity of the arts. Field trips to area museums.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 140 - Modern Art: 19th Century


    Examines neoclassicism, romanticism, realism and impressionism. Studies the development of landscape painting in England, France, and the United States in relation to the rise of urbanization and industrialization, and the origins of an “avant-garde.”

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 142 - Art and the Experience of Modernity, 1880-1940


    A survey of the major movements in avant-garde art from the late-19th century to World War II in Western Europe and the United States. We will examine how the art of this period–painting, sculpture, collage, photography, architecture–engaged the modern world through strategies as varied as resistance, subversion and open embrace. The course begins with the generation of neo- and post-impressionist painters, covers the development of abstraction and concludes with the surrealist dreamscape.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 143 - Art from 1940 to 1970: Modernism and Its Discontents


    A survey of the major trends in art between 1940 and 1970, focused primarily, but not exclusively, on the art scene in Europe and the United States. We will begin with the emergence of New York as the center of the international avant-garde and the seat of Abstract Expressionism in the years after World War II. The course will then trace the disintegrating confidence of the mid-20th-century modernist moment, examining such movements as neodadaism, pop art, minimalism, and the land artists of the late 1960s.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 144 - Art Since 1970


    A survey of the major trends in art since 1970, focused primarily, but not exclusively, on the art scene in Europe and the United States. We will begin with the art movements of the 1970s that challenged the traditional definition of “a work of art,” including conceptualism and body art. The course will continue with the rise of postmodernism and the death (and resurrection) of the author through the expanded field of painting, sculpture, video, and installation art in recent decades. We will study this art in light of contemporary social and political concerns, such as feminism, the pervasiveness of commercial culture, and the increasing globalization of identity.

    Spring 2018 Focus: Global Contemporary Art

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 156 - African Art and Architecture


    This introductory course focuses in the art and architecture of the vast African continent from prehistory to the present day, including the art of the global African diaspora. It addresses the wide range of African arts from the many diverse African peoples and regions and the complex historical, cultural and religious overlay with the introduction of Judaism, Christianity and Islam and colonial rule. Particular aspects of African art featured will include visual abstraction, innovation of form and assemblage of materials, the primacy of sculpture and adornment of the human body, and the linkage of art to ritual and performance. Students will also critically evaluate problematic and discrepant interpretations of African art and changing perceptions. This course operates on the theory that “less is more” and we will focus on a few select monuments from each area and period of Africa to study in depth.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ARTH 158 - Art and the City of Worcester


    This class is an introduction to art history, using the rich trove of art collections within the city of Worcester as primary objects of study. Each week we will be immersed in the art of a specific time and place, reading relevant articles and then examining, in person, actual examples of art from the period. Over the course of the semester, we will visit the collections of the Worcester Art Museum, the American Antiquarian Society, and the Higgins Armory Museum, and will also study several examples of public art in the city. By the end of the semester, students will have gained a foundation in art history and will also have come to know the City of Worcester in greater depth. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective requirement.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    ARTH 161 - The Arts of Islam


    The rich visual and material histories of the Islamic peoples encompass many cultures and regions as diverse as Spain, Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia and include one third of the world’s population. This course explores Islamic art and architecture from the lifetime of the Prophet Muhammad (d. 632) to the present. Tracing the development of the mosque and the madrasa (religious college), palaces and fortresses from the 7th century, we will reflect on regional variations and influences of neighboring cultures and religions. We will also look at the complex and challenging ‘exchanges’ of art and architectural techniques fostered and forced by the Crusades. The course will consider arts including architectural decoration, calligraphy, miniature and mural paintings, ceramics, glassware, ivory and metalwork, and textiles. The disinclination towards the representation of figural art (aniconic art), sacred geography and ritual, and the importance of commercial and political exchange will also be studied. Major monuments will include the Alhambra in Granada, Krak des Chevaliers and the Citadel of Aleppo, the Great Mosques of Damascus, Cordoba, and Djenne, the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, and the Taj Mahal in India. Field trip(s) will be to area museums.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: na

  
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    ARTH 201 - Art, the Public, and the History of Worcester


    This core seminar is required for the Art History Major. It is anchored around a specific project developed in dialogue with a cultural institution in Worcester County. Students will work together on a written product that will have a public audience in Worcester. Classwork will include reading assignments that are discussed in depth; independent research conducted on site at the cultural institution and in interviews; and peer review and editing of written work.

     

    Prerequisites: ARTH 010 recommended

    Anticipated Terms Offered: annually

  
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    ARTH 210 - The Art of Art History: Teaching and Methods


    This seminar and practicum is the capstone experience for majors in art history. Students enrolled in this course will serve as PLAs (Peer Learning Assistants) for the art history survey, Arth 010, Stone Age to Our Age. This seminar has two primary goals:1) to explore some of the major critical questions that art historians have asked, and attempted to answer, about our discipline; and 2) to provide guidance and critical support for teaching art history discussion sections. Among the questions that our seminar readings will address: how do we talk and write about art, which is by definition non-verbal, and how do we help others learn to talk and write about art? What is the influence of social and political context on a work of art, and how can we guide others to an appropriate use of this historical information? What makes for an effective discussion group experience?

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ARTH 215 - The Temple Builders: Architecture in Ancient Greece


    Traces the evolution of monumental architecture in Greece from its origins in the Geometric period through its development in Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic times. Emphasizes the integration of craftsmanship, or techne, with elements of design in the Doric, Ionic and Corinthian orders. Discusses the relationship between architect and patron, the social role of architecture and its political impact, as well as the problems of modern investigation and reconstruction of ancient buildings.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 216 - Architecture and Democracy


    This seminar explores the relationship between the built environment and civic ideology in ancient Athens and 20th-century America. “Built environment” refers to structures in, through and around which a society functions and includes both private and public buildings and spaces. “Civic ideology” means ideas that embody the collective beliefs and aspirations of the citizen body. In particular we will be interested in the relationship between the individual citizen and the state in ancient Athens and 20th-century United States and the means by which architecture acts to construct that relationship. Area field trips.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 219 - Special Topics in Art History


    Introduces specific topics in Art History and focuses on student research, oral presentation, and writing skills. Qualified students from other disciplines are welcome. Course may be taken for credit more than once. May be repeatable for credit.

    Spring 2017 Topic: Making Ancient Art: Technology and Production in Antiquity

    Have you ever wondered how monuments and engineering projects as large as the Great Pyramids of Giza or the Pont du Gard aqueduct in France were constructed? How about how intricate black figured Greek vases and bronze sculptures were crafted? This course investigates the technology, engineering, and production processes used to create everything from monumental buildings to intricate jewelry in the ancient Mediterranean world. We will learn how materials were extracted, produced, and distributed in antiquity through an examination sites, buildings, objects, and texts. We will focus on the ancient Mediterranean broadly considered, including Egyptian, Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman cultures. Topics include pottery and glass production, mining and metallurgy, quarrying and sculpting, building construction, weaving, and woodworking, among others. Finally, we will learn not only on how ancient art was made but who made it by examining the lives of artisans, craftspeople, laborers, slaves, and traders. This seminar will include lectures, discussions, hands-on classroom activities, and visit to the Worcester Museum. Ultimately, our goal will be to learn about the role that technology and production played in larger social and economic process in the ancient Mediterranean world, as well as their legacies in our modern world today.

    May be repeated for credit

     

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 220 - Sub-Saharan African Art: Challenges of Evidence, Interpretation, Preservation & Ownership


    This seminar will highlight major issues in the study, interpretation and preservation of the arts of Sub-Saharan Africa, including recent studies challenging previously conceived beliefs regarding the art and architecture of this extensive, diverse region. Seminar participants will also explore the complex legal and ethical issues connected to African arts such as where and how objects are displayed in museums and other venues, disputed claims of ownership and future strategies for resolution.

     


     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: DI

    Anticipated Terms Offered: bi-annually

  
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    ARTH 230 - Caravaggio


    Focuses on the work of one of the best known artists of any period, the painter Michelangelo Merisi or Caravaggio (1573-1610). Although he died a young man in 1610, he is often considered the most important painter of the 17th century. Explores Caravaggio’s intense naturalism and the controversy it caused, his sense of drama and supernatural light and the role of his personality in works of art. Surveys his life in Rome, Naples, Malta and Sicily, considering his religious paintings, genre scenes and still lifes. Considers the contradictory aspects of his character: his sexual ambivalence, his criminal violence and his intense spiritual devotion. Explores his artistic legacy in Italy and abroad with a strong emphasis on Artemisia Gentileschi. Readings include art-historical scholarship, history and original documents from the period. Field trips to area museums.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall 2010, Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 231 - Leonardo da Vinci


    Leonardo da Vinci is often regarded as the Renaissance epitome of the “universal man.” This seminar will help students reach a deeper understanding of Leonardo’s achievements and working methods as an artist, architect, anatomist and engineer. As our own age moves towards narrower specialization, the myth of Leonardo looms large as an unreachable ideal of “genius.” How relevant is Leonardo, and how might one unite humanistic and artistic thinking with the latest advances in science and engineering? What role did aesthetic knowledge play in the life of Leonardo, and what assumptions do we make about aesthetics today? What methods did Leonardo use to cultivate and express his intellect? Analyzing Leonardo’s paintings and notebooks will provide an introduction to developments in Renaissance Art. We will examine various writings about Leonardo in an effort to develop a critical understanding of biography and its tropes. Students will learn fundamental methods of art historical analysis while engaging in their own attempts to ‘decode’ the works of the master as well as more recent art that engages with science and technology. The course will interweave historical study of aesthetics, sixteenth-century “science”, and technology. In the process, each student will be encouraged to find ways to make Leonardo’s example relevant to his or her own intellectual development.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 233 - Tropical Baroque: The Arts of Colonial Latin America


    Tropical Baroque will be the first seminar devoted to the Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture of Colonial Latin America (1492-1820), an arts tradition of greater richness and diversity than many in Europe itself. It will include not only Spanish America, including New Spain (Mexico, New Mexico and California), the Andean region, the Caribbean, Brazil and the Southern Cone (Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay), but also the former Portuguese territories in Brazil. The course will consider architecture, including palaces and villas, cathedrals and churches, and fortresses and public spaces. It will also examine painting and sculpture, both religious and secular, as well as the so-called minor arts such as furniture, metalwork, textiles and ceramics, which have received much attention in recent scholarship. The field of Colonial Latin-American art is enjoying a renaissance in recent years. The people and societies who produced and used this art and architecture came from the widest spectrum of backgrounds and walks of life. They included Amerindians, Africans, Asians and mestizos, as well as Europeans from places as varied as Spain, Italy and Bohemia. Mirroring the incredible diversity of Latin America’s natural landscapes, colonial art and architecture blended styles and techniques from Aztec, Inca and Guaraní civilizations with those from Europe, North Africa and the Far East to produce works of unprecedented creativity and originality.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Spring 2010, Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 234 - Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture


    Examines how certain societies of the early Americas created objects and buildings that gave meaning to the sense of self, community and world. Objects and buildings, both in their characteristics and function, assist in the retelling of certain sociological and spiritual “truths” shared within a community. This seminar offers students an introduction to case studies of Pre-Columbian objects and architecture that reflect narratives about creation, sacrifice, divinity, and communal success. The examples are drawn from Mesoamerica (Olmec, Nayarit, Teotihuacan, Maya, and Aztec) and the Andes/Peru (Nazca, Moche, and Inca). There are no prerequisites classes in art history or language. Seminar work will include field trips to area museums and first-hand study of Pre-Columbian objects in the Worcester Art Museum.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall

  
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    ARTH 243 - Design in the 20th Century: Arts & Crafts to Ikea


    A survey of modern design in the Western hemisphere, including furniture, textiles, appliances, logos and graphic design, and architecture. Throughout the 20th century, modernists have used design to promote various reformist agendas - reform of working conditions for the industrial laborer, reform for the lifestyles of individual consumers, and reform of the values held by society at large. This course examines the objects and buildings that were designed to be the vehicles of social change, and analyzes their aesthetics as well as their ideological agendas. The course begins with the radical Arts & Crafts movement in Britain and the United States, and then covers International Style architecture and Bauhaus design in the 1920s, biomorphic and atomic-age design in the mid-20th century, the design of appliances and automobiles in the postwar period, and postmodernism in the late-20th century. The course concludes with an analysis of our own contemporary, design-obsessed society, investigating the populist agenda of such enormous commercial empires as Target and Ikea.

    Prerequisites: Prereq: A lecture class in modernist art strongly recommended.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every other year

  
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    ARTH 245 - Urban Art and Society in Jazz Age New York


    In the 1920s and early 1930s, New York City was home to (or the inspiration of) some of the nation’s most innovative visual, literary and cinematic works. In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will investigate skyscraper architecture, paintings of city life, advertising photography, The Great Gatsby, art-deco furnishings, the Harlem Renaissance, and flapper movies. Through a mixture of secondary literature and a wide range of primary sources, we will explore broader themes such as the changing boundaries between “low” and “high” culture and the construction of an urban American identity as inflected through race, gender and class.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    ARTH 248 - Gender and Representation


    An exploration of the manifold ways gender affects the production and reception of art. The course will consider the role of gender in art from three perspectives: 1) how gender affects the artist’s sense of self; 2) how gender affects pictorial representation; and 3) how gender impacts the way one views a work of art. The course will focus primarily on late-19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century art, with individual classes devoted to selected artists or thematic issues.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    ARTH 249 - Special Topics: Modern Art/Seminar


    Introduces specific topics in the study of modern art. Research and writing intensive. Qualified students from other disciplines are welcome. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ARTH 297 - Honors in Art History: Senior Year


    Qualified students who want to pursue Honors in Art History should identify an area of interest, select an appropriate advisor, and apply for eligibility to the art history faculty before April 1 of their junior year. The honors thesis is a year-long project, and the student registers for one section of ARTH 297 each semester. During the first semester, the student completes research and begins the writing process. No grade is given in the fall. In the second semeseter, the thesis is completed, and is submitted no later than April 15. A second reader, chosen by the student and advisor, will participate in the final evaluation. Credit is given for course work completed, even if a student is not recommended for honors. The honors in art history fulfills two area requirement courses for the art history major. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTH 298 - Internship


     

    Academic experience taking place in the field with an opportunity to earn credit. May be repeatable for credit.
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ARTH 299 - Directed Study


     

    Undergraduates, typically juniors & seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved & directed by a facutly member.  May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: every semester

  
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    ARTS 100 - Visual Studies: 2D Design and Color


    Considers visual perception and visual problem-solving/figure-field relationships, two-dimensional pattern and form, and theory and dynamics of color. This is a project-based class exploring design elements and principles. Open to nonmajors. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 101 - Myth & Symbol


    Explores individual ideas of “The Sacred” and, how peoples of the world express the sublime with the creation of altars, shrines, ritual and ceremony. Using a variety of mediums, 2-D, 3-D and mixed media, students are encouraged to expand material usage and think outside studio walls where body and earth are also canvases. Myth, symbol, story, archetype, dream imagery, sacred sound and ritual are pathways to creation. Students step out of a typical experience of studio practice and into a soul directed approach to art making where the rich, inner landscape is a wellspring of source material. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective requirement.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    ARTS 102 - Drawing: Eye, Mind, Hand


    Addresses the mechanics and expressive potential of drawing. Traditional illusionist drawing techniques will be combined with exercises that facilitate personal expression and subjective response. In exploring the relationship among seeing, thinking and making, the beginning student will acquire fundamental skills in image making and insight into the creative process in general. Each faculty member will bring his/her unique perspective and personal studio practices to bear in the teaching of this course. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ARTS 119 - Introduction to Photo Media


    This is a survey course that will acquaint students to the narrative power of low tech digital technology and analog photographic techniques. Students will be introduced to the darkroom, shooting film and processing black and white prints. In an addition there will be workshops constructing pinhole cameras and creating photograms. Basic digital technology will be implemented to produce digital images and short films.
    Students will be introduced to the history of the photographic medium through a series of lectures and participate in class critiques.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ARTS 120 - Introduction to Photography


    Introduction to black-and-white photography emphasizing the zone system and including camera operation, developing, printing and finishing techniques. Students must have a variable-setting 35 mm camera with a built-in or hand-held exposure meter and must provide their own film and paper. Open to nonmajors.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ARTS 121 - Intermediate Photography


    Continues the refinement of photographic seeing through darkroom techniques, digital imaging and alternative processes. We will consider a broad spectrum of aesthetic, formal and conceptual issues in the field of fine-art photography, while students will be encouraged to develop a personal vision. Some reading and writing required, as is a field trip. Students will meet weekly for critiques and lectures, concluding the semester with a comprehensive portfolio. Open to nonmajors.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Prerequisites: ARTS 120  or acceptable portfolio with instructor permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ARTS 122 - Introduction to Digital Photography


    With the rapidly advancing digital processes replacing the medium of color photography, the spring session of this course will concentrate on digital capture and through-put to fine art pigment-based ink jet prints in a studio environment. Basics of shooting digitally and working with the image through Adobe Photoshop will be covered extensively, as well as the integration of other studio disciplines into this process. Arts 120, equivalent, or instructor permission required.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 124 - Introduction to Graphic Design


    Introduction to the language, process and potential of graphic design as communication. Exercises and applied problems emphasize the relationship between form and meaning, typography, image making and conceptual development. Studio practice explores the potential of traditional (and some experimental) tools and methods for investigation, mark-making, image creation, iteration, and layout. While most work is generated by hand using pencil, pen, brush, cut paper, and hand-placed texts, best practices for transitioning into and leveraging the digital environment are also introduced. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year/fall semester

  
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    ARTS 125 - Graphic Design Projects


    Intermediate-level projects in graphic design, with reference to particular design media such as books, identity, maps, exhibit design, Web sites, etc. Emphasis on exploring conceptual development and the problem-solving process. (Knowledge of Mac-based page-layout programs is helpful, but not required.)

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Prerequisites: ARTS 124  or permission of the instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year/spring semester

  
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    ARTS 128 - Drawing: Sense of Place


    Students will engage the environment of Worcester by drawing on site at a variety of locations, from abandoned factories to Victorian parks, a littered railbed to a wooded Quaker cemetery. By actively looking, we will forge a connection to this city, while recognizing other relationships to place—-including the archetypal places we carry or inhabit within ourselves. The emphasis will be on learning how to see where we are and to be more fully aware of how this relationship to place defines us. Globalization, Internet intimacy, easy mobility and politics may all influence our understanding and feelings about place, but there is perhaps nothing so immediate and illuminating as the act of simply perceiving and translating the world around us. Artists who have referenced or manipulated “place” in their work will also be studied.

    Prerequisites: ARTS 102 or ARTS 129

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically/fall semester

  
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    ARTS 129 - Drawing: The Body


    Focuses on the human form through various drawing methods, with analysis of the structure and anatomy of the body, as well as exploration of the expressive potential and symbolic associations of the human figure.  Arts 102 recommended.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 132 - Painting I


    Seeing and Believing/Rotating Faculty: Emphasis on representational painting strategies. Introduces the fundamentals of craft and explores the synthetic possibilities of paint, while discussing the conceptual basis for this medium (Why paint?). Focuses on material–both the materials employed by the painter, and the materials the painter simulates. Painting as a vehicle for thinking and communication will be stressed. Students who have taken ARTS 132 Painting I: Self Made Worlds may take ARTS 132 Painting I: Seeing and Believing for full credit.

    Self Made Worlds/Rotating Faculty: Emphasis on constructing alternative realities. The painted image has been with us since the first handprint appeared on a cave wall. It remains an intimate and powerful index of an individual’s quest for self-expression, and acts as a mirror of culture’s changing image of itself. The basic toolbox of painting techniques will be explored along with an introduction to painters and painting concerns from the past through to the contemporary moment.The emphasis of this course will shift depending on the professor. Students who have taken ARTS 132 Painting I: Seeing and Believing may take ARTS 132 Painting I: Self Made Worlds for full credit. ARTS 102 - Drawing: Eye, Mind, Hand  or its equivalent is highly recommended. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective.

    May be repeatable for credit.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 133 - Painting II


    Beyond the Surface/Rotating Faculty:

    Emphasis on representational painting, but we will also strive to see beyond the appearance of things. This course will continue an exploration of painting techniques including more experimental media and approaches to the depiction of form and space on a two-dimensional surface. The game of illusion in trompe l’oeil will challenge the student as will the metaphysics of apprehending the physical world. Can the invisible be made visible?

    States of Being/Rotating Faculty:

    After a basic introduction to painting, one can experience more elaborate and personal directions within the medium. Ms Walker will look at alternative notions of space and states of being such as micro/macro, dream and psychological states, as well as cyberspace. Painting II again taught from varying perspectives based on the studio work of each professor.

    May be repeatable for credit.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year.

  
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    ARTS 136 - 3D Form & Sculpture


     

    Sculpture: An Introduction”

     

    What is sculpture?  These days, the term “sculpture” encompasses art ranging from traditional figuration to radical conceptual work, and everything in between. But there are some fundamental elements, common to all three-dimensional works of art that we can explore individually to gain a solid sculptural foundation.  Scale, surface, structure, and materials - these are all fundamental properties of sculpture, and in this class students will begin to explore them.  We will also examine the expressive implications of objects; sculptures are objects that communicate, and we will examine how they go about doing this.

    The class will take a learning-by-doing approach, and as a result will emphasize process over product.   The acts of making, looking, evaluating, and remaking are at the core of the sculptural process, and students will be encouraged to take risks and not be too precious with their pieces.  We will use materials that are readily available, inexpensive, and that allow us to work quickly: cardboard, foamcore, found objects, etc.  We will also look at examples of work, both historical and contemporary, to broaden our understanding of what sculpture is and what it can be.  In-class assignments and take-home projects will emphasize sculptural fundamentals while allowing for broad interpretation.

    Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 137 - Sculpture Projects


    Intermediate course focused on contemporary issues of sculpture and objects in a spatial environment.

    What and Where

    Students will explore the social, cultural, and personal implications of using found and domestic objects in their work. We will discuss the multidimensional relationship between form and meaning when potentially disparate objects exist within a work. From bringing the world of objects into our work, we will then examine the possibilities of bringing our work out into the world. What are the contextual relationships when a work is placed in a dark alleyway, on the beach, in the woods, in an old basement, or on the ceiling? Does the environment in which the work exists merely inform it or does it become a part of the work itself?

    The class will take a learning-by-doing approach, emphasizing process. Students will be taught basic techniques of fabrication and construction. In addition, we will look at examples of work, both historical and contemporary, to broaden our understanding of what sculpture is and what it can be.

    Open to non-majors ARTS 136 highly recomended.

    May be repeatable for credit.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered ever year

  
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    ARTS 150 - Special Topics in Studio Art


    Fall 2016 Topic: Terra Incognita

     

    Artists have felt the urge to depict their environments since prehistoric times. The world outside continues to be a relevant, vital inspiration.  Locations can be urban or rural, natural or unnatural, real or imagined.  The western visual cortex is deeply embedded with templates - iconic images of the landscape which students should identify, question, subvert, or even celebrate.  This class uses September and October as a plein air experience gathering information for homework and later studio assignments. We will explore various techniques, styles, and approaches to landscape drawing and painting working directly from nature. The studio work will utilize any medium.  Some reading is expected as well as active participation in class discussions. Individualized instruction, along with group exercises and critiques, will help strengthen your technical and expressive approach with a variety of media. Keeping a sketchbook is required.

    This course is appropriate for beginners: no prerequisites are required.  First-year students welcome.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall 2016

  
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    ARTS 158 - Printmaking I


    A survey of printmaking techniques and aesthetics including:relief and intaglio printing, linoleum cuts, etching methods using metal plates, and collagraph prints. Open to nonmajors. Fulfills Aesthetic Perspective.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: AP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 161 - Printmaking: Experimental Media


    A further investigation into the diverse materials of printmaking. Relief, serigraphs, collagraphs, monotype, and intaglio methods will be used to gain a richer knowledge of the medium. Open to all students.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 162 - Exploring the Natural World: Seeding Artistic Process with Drawing and Mixed Media


    This class explores the natural world as visual model and studies organic process as a metaphor for artistic process. With close observation of Nature’s forms and structures, students sharpen their eyes and experiment with different field-drawing techniques. Numerous drawing expeditions produce a collection of images to use as seeds for finished work. Students are encouraged to experiment with a variety of materials and create an individual final project in one or more of the media covered.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Prerequisites: Basic drawing skills required.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 208 - Typography


    Study of the informational and expressive dimensions of typographical language. The history and technology of type is considered, with an opportunity to handset metal type, as well as do extensive work on the computer. Applications to a variety of problems, including letterhead, poster and publication design.

    Prerequisites: ARTS 124  and/or ARTS 125 , or permission of instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 209 - Motion Graphics


    This course covers basic principles of time-based graphic design. Students explore theoretical and production techniques through projects that cultivate a heightened sensitivity toward design for the screen. Students learn to create a basic web page to present their course projects. No coding experience required.

     

     

    Prerequisites: Any Studio Art Course or Perm

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 234 - Studio Topics


    Students will create significant individual works within a peer group framed by contemporary topics that vary each fall. This interdisciplinary course is structured as a seminar and requires extensive student participation in discussions, as well as independent creative work in a chosen medium. Topics will revolve around both timeless and highly contemporary issues confronting the artist in the making of his/her work. Will involve readings and some writing. Majors only and must have taken at least 7 studio art classes.

    May be repeated for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year/fall semester

  
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    ARTS 250 - Photography Studio


    Fall 2016: Intermediate Digital Photography This is an intensive, production-based projects course. Students will self-design a semester-long project to explore their choice of themes such as journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images, etc. There will be workshops in both advanced digital techniques and alternatives to incorporate traditional photographic materials within the digital medium, including film scanning for printing. The goal is to create a portfolio of images based on the student’s project of his/her choosing, resulting in publication of a “publish on demand” book as a final project.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    Prerequisites: ARTS 122  and permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    ARTS 254 - Graphic Design Studio


    Advanced applied problems involving the role of designers in professional practice, working with clients and organizations. Consideration of the role of and opportunities for design in meeting communication needs. May be taken for credit more than once.

    Prerequisites: ARTS 124 , ARTS 125 , and ARTS 208 , or permission of the instructor.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 258 - Printmaking Workshop: Artist Books


    Students will refine technical ability in printmaking, sharpen critical-thinking abilities and develop a personal iconography. Independent work and thematic progression is encouraged.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate beginning/intermediate studio art courses or instructor permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 266 - Sculpture Studio


    Students will learn and employ traditional methods to sculpt the human figure, working from a live model. With an emphasis on observation, projects will focus on exploring gesture, proportion and form. Techniques will include armature building, clay modeling, and plaster casting.  The course will include some discussion on anatomy and the history of the figure in sculpture. May be repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate sculpture experience and instructor permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    ARTS 274 - Contemporary Directions


    In this course we will discuss the subjects, issues and themes that are important to artists working today. What is the role, responsibility or purpose of contemporary art? Students will be expected to actively participate in discussions and complete all assigned readings and projects. This course will have two long-term projects in which each student is assigned a contemporary artist to research and create a body of work as a response to the assigned artist’s work. Including the following artists: Janine Antoni, Ai Weiwei, Josephine Halvorson, Jeff Koons, Kara Walker, Arlene Shechet and many more! Students will gain valuable knowledge of contemporary art issues, understanding how their work relates to other contemporary artists and practice presenting their own work.

     

    May be repeatable for credit.

     

    Past topics: Contemporary Issues

    Prerequisites: Any studio art course

    Anticipated Terms Offered: periodically

  
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    ARTS 280 - Advanced Studio in Painting and Drawing


    This course addresses current or timely topics in the area of Studio Arts. Topics can vary from semester to semester. May be repeatable for credit.

    Students will be charged a V & PA lab fee upon registering for this course.

    SPRING 2018 Topic: Drawing: The Expanded Mark. How do we define a creative mark? What purpose does it have and how do we make our mark in the world? These and other questions will be addressed through a series of drawing studies in which students create instances of gesture and meaning in unconventional ways. Giving equal weight to both aesthetic form and conceptual content we will explore contemporary art practices through diverse themes such as time, space, and improvisation. This studio workshop course will utilize non-traditional media, collaborative groups, interdisciplinary models, and site-specific projects.

    Prerequisites: Any ARTS Course

    Anticipated Terms Offered: periodically

  
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    ARTS 289 - Senior Thesis


    Advanced seminar for studio art majors in any concentration. Working independently, but in close consultation with the instructor and interaction with the class peer group, the student will prepare a cohesive and mature body of work to be presented in a group exhibition in the University Gallery and to a committee with oral and written support to be considered for honors. This work should demonstrate original thinking and a high level of technical mastery. May be repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites: ARTS 234  or instructor permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year/spring semester

  
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    ARTS 296 - Special Topics: Gallery Culture and Practice


    AY 17/18

    Gallery Culture and Practice

    This is an enhanced internship experience for students interested in the curation and presentation of four art exhibitions in the Schitlkamp Gallery and several shows in the Art Lab in the Traina Center for the Arts.  Students will work on all aspects of planning and preparing for shows and related programming in the main gallery space, as well as curating and organizing shows of their own design in the Art Lab and possibly other spaces on campus.  The internship/course will also involve visiting outside exhibitions and discussing how the context of displaying art and artifacts can affect how they are perceived.  How is art chosen to be displayed, who chooses, how and where is the art presented and how does this determine discourse about it?  This course will continue throughout the year (half-credit each semester) and students are encouraged to enroll both semesters, though this is not a requirement. 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: periodically

  
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    ARTS 298 - Internship


     

    Academic experience taking place in the field with an opportunity to earn credit.

  
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    ARTS 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors & seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved & directed by a facutly member.  May be repeatable for credit.

    Students may need to pay V & PA lab.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: every semester

  
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    AS 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

 

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