2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
    Aug 19, 2022  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
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    ENG 375 - Fictions of Empire: Studies in Global English Literature


    This seminar provides an introduction to contemporary global literature in English. The writers we will discuss come from very different backgrounds–from South Asia to Africa to the Caribbean–but they are all engaged with making sense of the legacy of colonialism and the emergence of something we might call global culture. These texts are exciting stylistically because of their inventive uses of language and narrative structure: their experiments with form capture the sense of new nations coming into being, new approaches to cultural tradition, and the new status of English as a global language. The stories they tell entertain while also providing original perspectives on histories of empire marked by political struggle, violent conflict, and global inequalities. Topics we will consider include: the idea of the “postcolonial”; the relationship between literature and political resistance; the transformation of metropolitan English writing and language; “subalternity” and problems of representation; writing from a position of displacement, exile, and diasporization; and the persistence of colonial narratives in contemporary forms of imperialism. The specific focus of this course will change from year to year, but authors to be discussed may include Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Chinua Achebe, Buchi Emecheta, J.M. Coetzee, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S. Naipaul, Anita Desai, Derek Walcott, and Zadie Smith. For English majors, this course satisfies the Period (C-3) requirement

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Occasionally

  
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    ENG 376 - Ethnic America: Literature, Theory, Politics


    This seminar investigates the ways in which the “American” and the “ethnic” continue to be perceived as mutually exclusive identity categories in contemporary U.S. fiction. Despite the nation’s longstanding history as a nation of immigrants and its forecasted future as the most multiethnic and multilingual country in the world, the U.S. continues to resist the incorporation of its ethnic populations through overt and covert means of division, estrangement, and discrimination. Students will read a wide range of texts by “ethnic” and “nonethnic” writers and theorists to explore the ways in which the nation’s ethnic constituents are continually changing the definitions of its national identity, and to consider whether the American/ethnic dichotomy is real or imagined. For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the Period (C-3) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year

  
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    ENG 379 - Fictions of Asian America


    With particular emphasis on the multiple meanings of “fiction,” this seminar examines the ways in which the Asian American identity is constructed, imagined and contested in American literature and popular culture. Analyses will focus primarily on how texts and films produced within the last decade maintain or challenge established boundaries of the Asian American identity. Specific issues to be investigated include the model minority discourse and the demands of assimilation and citizenship; ethnic authenticity and hybridity; gender roles and sexual anxieties; cultural memory and nostalgia; and the commodification of Asian cultures and identities.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every year

  
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    ENG 380 - Studies in Contemporary Fiction: Literary Speculations


    This advanced seminar conducts cultural and historical examinations of speculative fiction and theory produced after 1945 in response to prevailing societal anxieties of the times. Topics and subgenres examined include alternate history and reality; plague and apocalypse; technology, artificial intelligence, and artificial life; utopia, anti-utopia, and dystopia; and futurity, afro- and ethnofuturism, and posthumanity. Our investigations will also draw on genre theories to explore the shifting conventions of literary, science, and slipstream fictions, and assess the rhetorical effects of the genre-bending exercises of their authors. Deep engagements with the writings of Rene Girard, N. Katherine Hayles, Achille Mbembe, Lauren Berlant, Fredric Jameson, Tzvetan Todorov, Priscilla Wald and many other theorists will frame our critical examinations.

    Satisfies the Genre (B-2) or Period (C-3) requirement for undergraduate English majors.

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 381 - Special Topics in 19th-C American Literature


    Special topics in 19th-century literature through the Civil War invite in-depth consideration of how extraordinary cultural, political, and technological changes made this one of the most vibrant and studied periods of the American literature.

    Special Topic Fall 2017: Emily Dickinson

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 384 - Special Topics in 17th- and 18th-Century American Literature


    Special topics in the earliest periods of American letters provide a broad historical foundation for literary study in all fields as well as the opportunity for in-depth investigation of critical issues of colonial and early Republic culture such as gender, race, religious discourse, scientific progress, and political contest. If taken at the undergraduate level, prerequisite: Major American Writers I or permission of the instructor. A student may take this seminar more than once, as long as the topics differ each time.

     

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 385 - Topics in Seventeenth-Century Literature


    Explores topics in the literary history of the seventeenth century with emphasis in changing ideas in science, history, politics, culture, and science. Depending on the special topic, course may include canonical as well as non-canonical, English as well as New England writing, and texts in a diversity of genres and disciplines.  Satisfies the Period (C-1) requirement.

    Special Topic for Spring 2017: Poetry, Theory, and Practice: This seminar asks the question, “what do poems do in the early modern world?” Critical writing on the nature of poetry is scarce in this period. Accordingly, we will turn to the poems themselves in order to tease out what theoretical premises underlie typical poetical practices. While this seminar will focus primarily on 17th-century transatlantic Anglophone poetry (English and American), we will look to some important earlier classical and Renaissance examples for additional background and context. Students will read poetry in modern editions as well as in facsimiles of original 17th-c printings. Students will also use digital surrogates of manuscript sources to understand early modern poetry as a scribal as well as printed culture.  May be repeatable for credit, depending on topic.

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 390 - Departmental Colloquium


    Provides graduate students with guidance, expertise and resolution for the writing of the master’s thesis. The chief requirement is an oral presentation, ordinarily given in the student’s final semester of course work. Participation and registration are required; however, the colloquium does not carry course credit and is not included as one of the eight courses needed to fulfill M.A. requirements.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ENG 393 - Special Topics in African American Literature


    Special Topics in African American Literature. May be repeatable for credit.

    SPECIAL TOPIC SPRING 2018 BLEEDING TRAUMAS: THE RUPTURE OF PRIVATE/PUBLIC SPACES OF SAFETY IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

    What boundaries are used to define public and private spaces? How are notions of safety informed and undermined by these boundaries and ruptures of space(s)? In what ways does trauma contribute to these ruptures? African American literature has explored notions of the binary positions of private and public spaces since emancipatory narratives, and writers continue to address the varied methods of these traumatic ruptures across literary genres. In this course, we will examine and discuss how African American artists understand and approach the expansion and conflation of the private/public spaces and how these moments are informed by trauma.

    SPECIAL TOPIC FOR FALL 2017 “SICK AND TIRED OF BEING SICK AND TIRED:” MEDICINE AND ETHICS IN BLACK WOMEN’S LITERATURE

    Utilizing the framework of the medical humanities, this seminar explores narratives of health, wellness, and ethics in works by black women writers. The medical humanities, or “narratiethics” as it is more specifically termed, is concerned with the historical practices of traditional scientific medicine and medical research and the various ethical abuses that have occurred throughout history in the name of scientific advancement. Because medicine and its practitioners wield considerable influence in the wellness outcomes of so many, narrative ethics as a discourse seeks to “humanize” medicine through narrative. This course explores how black women, who have so often been instrumentalized in scientific medical research while receiving the least benefit, understand and approach the question of ethics and humane treatment in medicine. It is a discussion format class with minimal lecturing, so students are expected to have read all materials and be prepared to discuss and analyze the text as the bulk of their participatory experience in class.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ENG 394 - History of the English Language


    Examines changes in English mainly during the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods. In addition to learning phonological and grammatical characteristics of the language during each period, the student examines language as a mirror of culture. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the Period (C-1b) requirement.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    ENG 397 - Master’s Thesis


    The M.A. Thesis is written in consultation with the student’s first and second readers, on a topic in the field of the student’s special interest.  At a point during the writing process, the first reader and M.A. candidate seek out a third reader.  The first reader must be a member of the English Department.

    Prerequisites: Permission of thesis adviser.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ENG 399 - Graduate Directed Study


    Directed Study Courses (399) are an effective way to deepen knowledge in a particular topic or field.  If interested in a directed study, the M.A. candidate should have a well thought-out proposal with a sense of what the goal for the course would be before talking with the professor who has expertise in the topic or field.  The student and faculty member will work together on determining a reading list and /or what the special project will entail.  In order to have an appropriate title recorded on your transcript, please consult with the professor first and then with Terri Rutkiewicz, who will walk you through the formalities.  Offered normally for 1 unit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered for variable credit every semester

  
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    ENG 1000 - Introduction to Composition


    Focuses on the writing process: prewriting, writing and rewriting. Discussion and writing activities will include all steps of the writing process beginning with developing ideas and carried through organizing, writing and editing. Students will experiment with different techniques and learn to adapt to different college writing situations.

  
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    ENG 1130 - Writing to Heal


    An exploration of writing as a tool in maintaining health and well being. We will look at the medical and psychological research that supports the belief that writing boosts in the immune system, reduces emotional distress, and lessens physical pain for some people. Through hands-on practice and group sharing we will become familiar with the ways in which the literary arts are tools for personal growth.

  
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    ENG 1150 - Intermediate Composition


    Competent expository writing skills are mandatory for college and professional success. Clarity, focus, development, organization, grammar and style are emphasized in this workshop-style course. Students write various types of essays to expand their methods of expression, increase their basic writing skills and experiment with individual writing styles. The course also covers the full process of researching, organizing, writing and documenting research papers.

    Prerequisites: ENG 1000 - Introduction to Composition 

    Anticipated Terms Offered: various

  
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    ENG 1230 - Writings of Place and Nature


    “It is not down in any map; true places never are,” Herman Melville wrote in “Moby Dick.” We are increasingly disconnected from the spirit of the natural world and our sense of place in this burgeoning technological age. The goal of this course is to reawaken our inherent connection to the earth, and place, in order to helps us see the world more clearly and understand it more deeply. We will study “nature writing” by those who have a special connection to the earth anchored a certain place, from Emerson and Thoreau to contemporary authors. As time permits we will conduct field studies, a film study, and be visited by an author. This course will explore what place can teach us, how it shapes our vision and sense of self along with our world view. Through reading and discussing essays, poems, and works of nonfiction, we will learn how we can be more aware of the world that sustains and surrounds us. Writing for this class will include creative pieces as well as analytical essays, and there will be a final project addressing a place of your choosing.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VE (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENG 1360 - News Writing and Editing


    This course is geared for people interested in improving their ability to communicate information through the written word. Students learn by doing–with an emphasis on developing professional writing and copy editing skills.

  
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    ENG 1480 - Emily Dickinson and Sylvia Plath


    We will embark on an examination of the poetic works of two remarkable American poets: Emily Dickinson and Sylvia Plath. Our focus will be on close readings of specific poems as well as  reviewing supporting background materials.

    Prerequisites: IDND 018 or VE placement

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VE (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENG 1490 - F. Scott Fitzgerald


    This course will provide an in-depth study of F.Scott Fitzgerals’s works. Along with Fitzgerald’s masterpiece The Great Gatsby, we will read a selection of short stories. Discussion will center on Fitsgeralds’s texts in the historical context in which they were written and our contemporary society. We will also watch and analyze film adaptaions of his works. This course welcomes students who are just discovering Fitzgerald and his work and those who are ardent students of Fitzgerald.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ENG 1570 - Literary Satire


    This course will wxplore the literary genre known as satire. Questions we will discuss include: What is satire? Why do authors choose to use it? How does it differ from parody? Over the course of the semster we will read Johnathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal,” George Orwell’s Animal Farm, Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle, and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World to enhance our understanding of satire.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ENG 1670 - Children’s Literature


    No doubt everyone has a children’s book they remember loving or having a particular impact. When books appeal to a child’s interests in natural, interesting ways, they develop a realtionship with literature that will last a lifetime. Students will learn how to recognize best literature for children, compile a children’s literature book summary, participate in discussions of the genre, and create an original example of literature for children.

  
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    ENG 1680 - Eastern Thought/Western Literature


    Examines the influence of Eastern philosophic and religious traditions on Western literature of the twentieth century. We look at the basic ideas and tenets of Vedanta, Buddhism, Taoism and Zen, as well as the poetics of haiku, and then look to how those premises affected both the poetry and fiction of modern literature in Europe, England, and America. Authors discussed may include Huxley, Hesse, Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Pirsig, and Ginsberg.

  
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    ENG 1870 - Philosophy Of Horror


    We read horror literature from the 18th century to the present, focusing on the popularity of the genre in relation to the desire to be frightened.  Students look at historical differences in what constitutes “dreadful pleasure,” as well as the various psychological reasons for its persistence and popularity in Western culture.
     

  
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    ENG 1910 - Dystopian Literature


    This course will explore the dystopian genre in literature. We will discuss how the authors portray their fears in the text and whether or not they still resonant today or have, in fact, come true to certain extents. We will read Huxley’s Brave New World. Orwell’s 1984, Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sleep (as well as watch sections of the movie it inspiried, Blade Runner)) and Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ENG 1920 - Survey of Enviromental Writings


    As concerns about climate change have become dire and widely acknowledged, environmentalism has entered the mainstream. Environmental disasters are consistently reported in the press, while questionable gadgets and products are marketed to us as as ‘eco-friendly.’ Thi cultural concern and ambivalence about nature echoes strongly in our litereatures. Nature writers both carve out new environmental philosophies, and they can reflect existing perspectives about nature and our place within it. In Environmental Writings, we will read a series of texts written between the 19th and 21st centuries that address various environmental isms, and more broadly nature as a whole. These texts will include nonfiction and fiction prose, as well as poetry.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENG 1930 - Rumplestiltskin to Ravenclaw: Children’s Literature From Golden Age to Silver Screen


    This course will survey the history of children’s literature from the 1800’s to the early 2000’s. Addressing works by such authors as Lewis Carroll, Roald Dahl, and J. K. Rowling, we will examine how society’s conception of childhood has changed over the past two hundred years. Supplementing our primary texts with contemporary work in the relatively new field of childhood studies, this course will also explore what children’s fiction has to tell us about cultural values and institutions. Among other things, we’ll consider the role children’s literature has played (and continues to play) in the culture of imperialism and the construction of gender and sexuality, and its increasing commercialization via film series and franchises.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ENG 2010 - Secrets of the Sisterhoods: Inside the Red Tent


    Throughout history, have women been observers in a man’s world, or simply participants and leaders in different ways? How do women of varying time periods and cultures view the world and their roles in it? These questions and more will be explored via modern and historical fiction novels, essays, films, discussion and oral history documentation, focusing on “global sisterhood.”

  
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    ENG 2030 - The Witch in Literature


    This course examines the figure of the witch as she appears in English and American literature from the Medieval period to the 20th century. Focus will not only be on the appearance of the character in fiction, poetry, and drama; but also on the psychological, historical, and mythological connections to those appearances.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VE (Summer Only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    ENG 2050 - Mythologies


    The purpose of this course is to expose students to various systems of myth from a number of global cultures. We will examine both the similarities and differences of the myths and consider why this is so. In addition, we also will examine the idea of mythic thinking, or consciousness, and why such forms of thought and image are deemed necessary for the psychological and moral health of  the cultures in which they form an inherent, and crucial part.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP (summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varied

  
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    ENG 2140 - Fiction on the Fringe: Crimes, Addictions and Psychoses


    An examination of selected 20th century works of fiction that deal with the social or psychological outcast(s). We will focus on each author’s construction of narrative, point of view, characterization, language and imagery. Questions regarding alternative versus traditional morality, the differentiation between marginal versus mainstream ethos will also be central to our investigations. Works studied include: “Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas”, “Girl Interrupted”, “American Psycho”, “One Flew Over the Cukoo’s Nest” and “Lolita.”

  
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    ENG 2180 - Malefica:Origin of Witchcraft


    Examines the mythological inheritance of European civilization that eventuated in the Witch craze of the Middle Ages through the Reformation as well as the development of pagan Wicca from the 18th century to the present day. Topics covered include goddess mythology, the Witch craze, Salem, Wicca and ecofeminism. Readings will include poetry, fiction, and drama as well as historical documents and various myths. Prerequisite:A compositon course or VE fulfilled.

  
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    ENG 2300 - Memoir Writing: Writing from Inside Out


     

    The craft of personal writing turns the messy and elusive facts of our life experience to compelling account.  Our memories can be not merely “reduced” to writing but enlarged by it-we don’t just write what we know; we write to find out what we know.  We try to elicit and shape the vivid details of our life stories and see what coherence, resonance, and even self-discovery emerge.  Through writing assignments and selected readings, we seek in this workshop to discern what makes certain writing fresh, intimate, provocative, graceful, funny, poignant or otherwise effective.  Work is read aloud, in a congenial setting, with a focus on voice, pace, compression, metaphor, dialogue, point of entry, word choice, and other elements.  We explore what it is we like about certain work, how the work might be improved, and what challenges the author may have faced in the process of composition. Pre-requisite: A composition course.  

     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varied

  
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    ENG 2310 - Topics in Journalism


    Offers students an expanded look at various kinds of stories that appear in newspapers, including hard news, features, columns, analysis and reviews. Focus this semester will be on coverage of foreign policy.

  
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    ENG 2320 - Literature on Page and Screen


    The nature of literary creation and communication will be studied through our reading and watching five twentieth-century American novels. Comparison of the book and film presentations will add dimension not only to our literary analysis of each novel, but also to our understanding of how we perceive meaning. Integral to our study is the nature of each mediumhow, why and how well each works in our culture.

    Prerequisites: .

  
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    ENG 2420 - Modern Monsters: The Serial Killer in Literature and Film


    The genre of serial killer fiction is a direct descendent of Gothic fiction, with the serial killers as updated models of Gothic villains. Like their Gothic predecessors, fictional serial killers are mythologized, folklorized and, in some cases, supernaturalized. Beginning with Psycho, students will critically analyze serial killer fiction novels and films of the mid-20th century to the present while investigating the following themes: American notions and expressions of individuality; the sociopolitical climate in which the serial killer is defined and the ways in which the narratives criticize this climate; changing notions of gender roles and anxieties therein; sexual anxieties; the expressions of cultural desires; and how myth informs the serial killer narratives. Prerequisite: VE fulfilled.

    Prerequisites: VE Placement or IDND 018

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VE (Summer only)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varied

  
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    ENG 2510 - Beat Generation Literature


    The beat Generation’s influence on American culture is still evident today, over 50 years after a group of young men- Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs and others-first met in New York City. These radical writers shook up the literary world with their disregard for traditional literary styles and themes and their blatant rejection of the cultural values of postwar America. We will focus on the following : notions of defiant individuality; alternative conceptions of religion , sexuality, and politics; the glorification of the drug culture and of criminality, and how pop culture factors into texts. Among the work studied in this class are Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and William S. Burrough’s Naked Lunch.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENG 2520 - Modern Irish Literature


    An introduction to the major authors of Irish Literature during the early 20th century (known in part as the Irish Literary Revival.) In addition to analyzing texts  in a general context. we will focus on how texts and authors represent Ireland’s past, present, and future in relation to Ireland’s status in the period. Discussion topics will include Ireland’s relationship with England, historical events, gender, Irish mythology and folklore, and Irish nationalism. Authors to be discussed include, not not limited to: George Bernard Shaw, W.B. Yeats, Lady Gregory, J.M. Synge, James Joyce, and Sean O’Casey.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENG 2590 - Voices of Protest


    “We the People” have lived up to our responsibilities per the U.S. Constitution’s Preamble to “establish Justice,…promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.”  When we feel these goals are being threatened, we protest.  This course will focus on people who have protested and have helped start grassroots movements.  This study will help us understand how pertinent legal, social, and economic policies have been shaped and influenced by common people, and how current perceived injustices might be approached.

  
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    ENG 2680 - The American Dream


    What is the “American Dream”? Has it changed through the years? Whose dream is it? Is it dead or alive in 2014? How does it function in American society? Does it help individuals succeed? How is it connected with immigration? We’ll study the American Dream in literature, film, and other arts (photography, painting, music).

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENG 2770 - 21st Century Ethnic American Literature


    Our focus in this course is a study of ethnic American literature from the 21st century. Each week is broken down into a theme: Home, Heritage, Language, Crossing, and Americans. Through these lenses, students will investigate readings by Asian American, African American, Native American, and Hispanic American authors. With the weekly writing assignments, students will develop their ideas about the literature, forming critical analyses of the works. By the end of this course, students will not only be more well read in the ethnic American literature canon, but they will also be well-versed in the important political, social, and historical contexts of those works. As this is a course that will emphasize the intersections between race, gender, sexuality, and class, students will also be able to recognize and articulate trends in contemporary literature, politics, media, and society that exist in American literature.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENG 2800 - Virginia Woolf


    Fueled by creative genius and mental instability, the writing of Virginia Woolf was cutting edge in the 1920s and ‘30s and remains stimulating to this day. Woolf’s profound influence on modernism and on literary and social criticism make her a significant force in Western literature. Woolf’s writing was devoted to the examination of women’s place in modern society and the nature of women’s desire. Focusing on individual women’s lives, her writing investigates the complexities of personal identity, the fluidity of gender and sexuality and women’s need for artistic and intellectual expression as well as psychological and financial independence. Deeply introspective, Woolf kept extensive personal diaries, which we will study in addition to her fiction and nonfiction.

    Prerequisites: Intermediate Composition.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ENT 105 - Creating a Culture of Innovation


    Are creativity and innovation synonymous? How do you create and support a culture of innovation? This course will combine theory and experiential assignments to introduce students to the concepts of creatvity and innovation as a source of social change. Students will gain a greater understanding of and appreciation for the creative/innovative processes and learn how to harness and direct those forces for themselves and others. This course will help prepare students to contribute in a unique and productive way to today’s entrepreneurial, societal, and organizational demands.  This course is typically taught as a first-year intensive for incoming students in the fall semester.  It is also approved for a Values Perspective (VP) in support of the program of liberal studies requirements.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall Semester only

    Placement Guidelines
    First Year Intensive course

  
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    ENT 115 - Entrepreneurship: Art of the New


    Successful entrepreneurship begins with a vision. Like an artist, the entrepreneur must be able to translate creative vision into something tangible and real. This course focuses on the foundations of entrepreneurship and is appropriate for students from any major. It is designed to introduce students to the entrepreneurial process so that they may begin to shape their own entrepreneurial vision. Course objectives include a realistic preview of the challenges of entrepreneurship, an understanding of the legal and ethical environment within which entrepreneurs operate, the skills to think critically and work toward the ability to evaluate opportunities in the business or nonprofit sectors. This is a course includes experiential entrepreneurship-related activities where students work individually to test ideas and practice entrepreneurship.  The course will also include self-assessment activities designed to help students assess their own entrepreneurial potential. (formerly ENT 215)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every semester

  
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    ENT 202 - Entrepreneurial Communication and Influence


    The goal of this course is to explore the role of persuasion and influence (a.k.a. the art of the pitch) as practiced in early stage entrepreneurial organizations, both in for-profit and non-profit organizations. Creating and communicating a compelling vision is arguably a critical life skill. Entrepreneurs must be able to effectively communicate their vision to a wide variety of audiences. Moreover, in today’s marketplace, entrepreneurs must be prepared to communicate in persuasive ways on a global scale. Through intensive classroom work, role playing, and real-world applications, students will explore and participate in sales, marketing and networking activities as they relate to entrepreneurship.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ENT 216 - Financial Intelligence


    Did you take out a loan (or two, or three) to attend college? If so, do you know how to calculate the return on your investment? What is the best way to maximize your cash flow? What do you need to know to determine an NGO’s financial health? How does a business make a profit but run out of cash? This course is designed to help students learn to answer these types of questions. Students will acquire a vocabulary and working knowledge to better understand “what the numbers mean.” Students will be introduced to the art of finance and why it matters. Using this foundation, students will leave the course with the ability to make financially intelligent and informed decisions about personal and organizational finances through the framework of launching a new venture.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: FA

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

  
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    ENT 217 - Funding Ventures


    This course is designed for students with an entrepreneurial spirit, for aspiring entrepreneurs interested in learning how to fund their ideas and anyone interested in learning the language and knowledge of entrepreneurial finance. Topics include: business valuation, financing options (bootstrapping, crowd-funding, venture capital funding, angel investing, bank loans, grants, and other sources of capital investment), ownership structures and due diligence, and exit strategies. The goal is to have students describe and understand these topics as part of the business planning process and develop a working understanding of these entrepreneurial concepts. A review and application of financial statements as part of funding a new venture will also be included.

    This is a .50 unit (half unit) course.  This means this course can be combined with another half unit course to satisfy a one unit requirement within the entrepreneurship minor.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 100 or ENT 115/215 with a grade of C or better

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every other year (Fall only preferred)

  
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    ENT 222 - Entrepreneurial Design Thinking


    This course will teach students to use a design thinking approach to decision making and problem solving. By learning this process students develop skills to help them become more successful at discovering new opportunities in any environment by refining their problem solving, listening, decision making and teamwork skills. This course will actively engage students in developing tangible, innovative products and concepts through a combination of lectures, hands-on lab work, field trips and guest lectures.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered annually

  
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    ENT 245 - Social Entrepreneurship


    ‘Social Entrepreneurship’ explores the relationship between the social issues confronting our global community and the use of business creation to stimulate ( “creatively disrupt”) local and world change. This course challenges the student to look beyond well-established business objectives – the creation of wealth – and investigate how wealth creation can impact public good. A review of global social entrepreneurial initiatives is an important focus of the course. Students consider such diverse social issues as environmental degradation, poverty, homelessness, lack of potable water, world health and education concerns, microcredit and more.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every semester

  
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    ENT 260 - Student Run Venture Management


    This course is designed for any undergraduate student actively engaged in managerial and leadership roles within the University-supported student run ventures.  The course is designed to engage students in actively practicing, learning, examining and understanding the complex challenges of managing a student-led business on campus while promoting an entrepreneurial mindset as it relates to the daily, weekly, monthly and annual operations of the student run ventures. Topics covered in this course include: Purposeful mission/vision/values alignment; Getting past resource constraints; Team building, Collaboration and sustainable partnerships; Time management; Project management; SMART goals; Financial reports and how to read them; Data-driven decision making; Marketing, branding and merchandising; and Customer service & sales. 

    This is a .50 (half unit) course.  Students can take this course with another half unit course to meet a 1 unit course requirement in the entrepreneurship minor.  This course is also repeatable so students can take it more than once for a .50 (half unit) of credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester or Once a Year

  
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    ENT 262 - Global ELab


    This course is designed for students with an entrepreneurial spirit and interest in understanding and examining entrepreneurship outside of the United States. This course will prepare students to apply, compare, contrast and examine business models from a global and international perspective. This course will require students to use problem solving, creative thinking and critical inquiry to examine international entrepreneurial opportunities around topics such as markets, competition, power and political considerations, social and cultural dynamics, ethical dilemmas, resources, sustainability and feasibility.  Students will travel to another country and have direct interaction with entrepreneurs and small business owners in that country. They will experience international business operations with local entrepreneurs and small business owners. The trip is a practice-based experience where students will be asked to examine and propose solutions to the challenges and opportunities of the entrepreneurs they work with.

    This is a .50 (half unit) course.  This means that students can combine this course with another half unit course within the entrepreneurship minor to satisfy a one unit requirement.

    Additional fees for travel apply to this course!

    Prerequisites: MGMT 100 or ENT 115/215

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Spring Semester

  
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    ENT 264 - Community Based Entrepreneurship


    This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their creativity and business acumen while helping a local not-for-profit, social purpose organization or start-up organization to launch a real business venture.  Student teams will be partnered with staff or volunteers from a local organization to develop a business model that has potential to support its ongoing operations.  Students will collaborate over the course of the semester with their partner organization and receive ongoing instruction and mentoring from the course instructor about the business model.  This course is an excellent opportunity to build a stronger community by linking students with emerging local organizations and successful business leaders in a collaborative process to help solve social problems.  This course is offered periodically and students can receive entrepreneurship minor capstone credit upon successful completion.  

    Prerequisites: MGMT 100 (The Art and Science of Management) and either ENT 215 (The Art of the New - Entrepreneurship) or ENT 245 (Social Entrepreneurship)

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Spring 2016/ Periodically

  
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    ENT 265 - Entrepreneurship Capstone Project Seminar I


    Every student who elects the minor is expected to complete a culminating experience as part of their coursework. Projects may be done by an individual student or as a member of a team. In this capstone experience, students are expected to take an entrepreneurial/ innovative idea and get it as close to launch (or actual launch) in 14 weeks as possible.  Students will present their formal launch plans and business model to panel of judges at the end of the semester.  This element of the program allows students to demonstrate synthesis and mastery of learning outcomes from the ENT minor program such as idea generation, collaboration, communication, project management skills, primary and secondary research, market analysis, financial modeling and industry mapping. This course is required for all Innovation and Entrepreneurship minors.

    Prerequisites: ENT 215 or ENT 245.  Preferred that ENT 202 is also taken.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall Semester or Every Semester depending enrollment projections

  
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    ENT 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Students should contact faculty member directly to discuss title.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall and Spring

  
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    ES 1210 - Journey to Sustainability


    “Journey to Sustainability” is designed for people interested in learning about the concept of sustainability and why sustainability is important for human survival. Simply put, is sustainability still possible, given that seven billion people are living on the planet? While this question may seem scary, the main goal of this course is to leave you with a feeling of hope for our environmental future. We will begin with a basic background in ecology and Earth’s systems. This background will provide the tools needed in order to develop one’s own conclusions when learning about current issues in environmental science. The second part of this course will focus on current environmental issues, which are mostly a result of humans using natural resources unsustainably. Issues studied will include climate change, overfishing, pollution, and energy. The last part of this course will focus on creating individual sustainability goals and assessing the current state of the planet.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: various

  
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    ES 1240 - Our World, Our Future: THe Philosophy and Politics of Sustainabliltiy


    We live in a world that is slowly coming to terms with its own limitations. Whether in scientific journals, or in the daily news, the future looks pretty bleak.  We constantly hear about the environmental crisis, the climate crisis, the ecological apocalypse and the energy crisis. While we are plagued by crises, questions about our common future have once again gained immense political currency and popular traction. In such a time, it becomes important to ask ourselves questions about sustainability so that we can act in ways that remediate our current crises, and offer alternatives to prevent them in the future. In this course, we start to do so by first exploring the concept of sustainability as it is understood in various philosophical traditions. We then explore the politics of sustainability in the context of various environmental issues to understand why sustainability is such a pressing issue by looking at the consequences of various unsustainable practices and actions. These issues range from global climate change, mining, pollution and waste, to energy and food systems. In the final part of the course, students will develop their own toolkit for sustainable living, connecting their individual lives with larger systemic conditions.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ES 1650 - International and Environmental Politics


    The Earth is Warming! The Climate is changing! We have too much snow! We have too little sun!

    If you live in the northern hemisphere, you’ve either heard all of these things, or said them yourself! Sometime during this last decade, while the world’s leaders were figuring out how to increase wealth and improve standards of living, the world itself has come upon an impending global environmental crisis. Suddenly, it would seem, the environment has become a momentous site of contention and conflict.  To understand this increasing occurrence of environmental conflicts in its local and global context, and further explore ways to manage and mitigate such conflicts, in this class, we will take a keen look at environmental politics. We start by asking, ‘what is the environment’ and ground ourselves theoretically by using the concept of ‘environmental justice’. We then explore various case studies from around the world, aiming to understand a) the socio-ecological origin of the conflict, b) the claims, grievances and demands of those engaged in conflict, and finally, c) the role of environmental governance in managing, mitigating and resolving such conflicts. The case studies will be drawn from different parts of the world, within four broad themes, representing different ways of understanding the environment.  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ES 1970 - Sustainability and the Sacred


    Indigenous cultures relied on three basic concepts to live sustainably: community, exchange and relationship. In this course we will experience and explore these three concepts. The interconnectedness of all life - the sacred - is the “technology” which lay at the heart of all indigenous cultures. It is all available to each of us still. Connecting to the plants, the animal kingdom, and one another as equals bring the tools we need to embrace earth changes and all that the future holds. Through this course you will be empowered to engage with Sustainability on your own terms. Please be advised that some class meetings will take place outdoors.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: various

  
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    ES 2000 - Exploring Nature of Central Massachusetts


    In this practical, hands-on course, you will learn how to identify common animals that live in a variety of ecosystems, discover edible wild plants are more widespread than you think, and experience exciting outdoor activities such as map & compass navigation, canoeing, and fishing. Explore the natural beauty of Central Massachusetts hidden within suburbs just minutes outside of Worcester and become familiar with the plants and wildlife that call this region home.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    ES 2750 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.

  
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    FILM 1150 - Exploring Hispanic Culture


    The Hispanic culture is rich and vibrant and we will come to a greater appreciation and understanding of it through an examination of its literature, poetry and films. The films we will view will be both popular and famous in Latin America and Spain and our readings will be from writers, contemporary and historic, that are well known not only in their own country but around the world (Isabel Allende, Vargas llosa, Gracia Lorca, Cervantes, etc.). Through our assignments there will be an opportunity for us to participate in a more in depth study of various aspects of Hispanic culture and traditions. By the end of the semester you will have acquired a greater understanding, interpretation and response to the Hispanic culture.

  
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    FILM 1640 - Chinese Film Studies


    This class aims to familiarize students with not only the overall history of Chinese cinema but also recent significant filmmakers and their works in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The class will begin with a brief and general survey of Chinese films since the 1920s to the present. As the semester continues our main focus will include films directed by the fifth generation and other important filmmakers in Mainland China as well as award-winning filmmakers in Hong Kong and Taiwan.



  
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    FILM 2320 - Literature on Page and Screen


    The nature of literary creation and communication will be studied through our reading five novels and viewing the films made of them. Comparison of the book and film presentations will add dimension not only to our literary analysis of each novel, but also to our understanding of how we perceive meaning. Integral to our study is the nature of each medium–how, why and how well each works in our culture.

    Prerequisites: Intermediate Composition.

  
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    FILM 2680 - The American Dream


    What is the “American Dream”? Has it changed through the years? Whose dream is it? Is it dead or alive in 2014? How does it function in American society? Does it help individuals succeed? How is it connected with immigration? We’ll study the American Dream in literature, film, and other arts (photography, painting, music).
     

    Anticipated Terms Offered: varies

  
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    FIN 4200 - Financial Management


    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and analytical techniques of financial management with a goal to help the student understand financial markets and financial decisions. Topics covered in this course include the time-value of money, valuation of corporate securities, valuation of corporate investments, market efficiency, risk and return, capital structure and corporate governance. The course focuses on the more practical application of these topics, although important theories and models are to be introduced to explain why the practical applications make sense; the student will also learn how to make simple financial decisions and recognize international differences in corporate finance using case studies and group presentations.

    Prerequisites: ECON 4004 ; STAT 4300  ; ACCT 4100  or ACCT 4101 . For MSA students, ACCT 4101   may be taken at the same time as this course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Annually

  
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    FIN 5201 - Case Studies in Corporate Finance


    This course will expose students to corporate finance theories and the application of these theories through case studies. The course builds on the main principles of corporate finance which include financial analysis, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and capital structure. We will learn how these financial concepts are interpreted and applied by corporations. Students will gain insights on how corporations make long-term investment decisions and how different classes of investors, debt and equity, evaluate companies.

     

    Prerequisites: FIN 4200  OR FIN 5401  Non MSF student registration is on a space available basis.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    FIN 5203 - Investment Strategies


    This course teaches students how to build and effective investment strategy. Taught in the final semester of the MSF program, this course draws on prior coursework in Investments, Fixed Income Securities, and Cases in Derivatives. Students will learn how to design a comprehensive strategy that uses multiple asset classes and tactics. Students will also study a variety of alternative investment strategies such as hedge funds, private equity, and real estate. The emphasis will be on the type of investment strategies employed by institutional investors such as pension funds and university endowment funds.

     

    Prerequisites: No prerequisite for MSF students. Students in other programs may register by permission only.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    FIN 5207 - Advanced Derivatives


    This course focus on the derivative assets such as futures, forwards, swaps, and options, financial engineering, risk management. The course will cover the pricing of these derivative assets as well as securities that contain embedded options. It will also consider risk management strategies such as static and dynamic hedging. Applications will be considered from equity, commodity, bond, and hedge fund.

    This course fulfills the Experiential Learning Requirement in the MSF Program.

    Prerequisites: FIN 5401  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Annually

  
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    FIN 5208 - Fixed-Income Securities


    Fixed income securities are the most traded asset class in the world. A significant portion of the institutional investors’ trading portfolio consists of fixed income securities and its derivatives. Markets for these securities have skyrocketed in the past few years, and their complexity has increased considerably (a factor contributing to the subprime crisis). Hence, it is important to understand the sources of risk for these complex securities and master the latest models and techniques to price and hedge these risks. The topics covered in the course include: the basic concepts of fixed income instruments such as yield, term structure, duration and convexity, pricing of basic instruments, interest rate risk management, recent modeling techniques to value both traditional and recent derivative instruments, Mortgage Backed Securities and Credit Derivatives, Inflation, Monetary Policy.Students will also learn how to use Bloomberg Fixed Income Analytics, the most common tool used by finance professionals.

     

    Prerequisites: FIN 5401  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Annually

  
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    FIN 5216 - Computational Finance


    Modern-day finance is rife with computationally intensive problems and solutions from pricing derivative instruments to complex portfolio building using optimization techniques. This course supplies students with the intuitions for the underlying mathematical concepts behind common financial applications. Furthermore, students learn the skills to develop their own solutions to variant of these applications with emphasis put on the generalizability of the results reviewed. Starting with binomial models as a stepping-stone, this course discusses the main tools applied to derivative valuation and their extension to continuous time pricing. It also considers common numerical methods utilized in financial engineering such as Monte Carlo simulation. The course ends with a review of common optimization tools and their application to portfolio building under constraints.

     

    Prerequisites: FIN 5309  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Annually

  
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    FIN 5309 - Financial Econometrics


    This course imparts students with the necessary knowledge and skills for understanding and running the common statistical analyses encountered in modern day market finance. The course starts with a review of probability theory and statistics before progressing to common econometric concepts employed in financial market research. This course is intended for students with at least a semester of introductory statistics under their belt. Topics include linear regression, time-series models (ARMA, VAR, ARCH and GARCH), unit root and cointegration models.

     

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites for MSF Students. Other students by permission only.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Fall semester

  
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    FIN 5310 - Case Studies in Derivatives


    The goal of this course is to learn how corporations use derivatives to manage risk. This involves identifying and quantifying the risks, selecting the appropriate tool for managing the risk, and implementing the decision. Risk management is only partly a quantitative field. Strategy, negotiation, marketing, and basic financial management are important as well. The course uses the case method. Each week students work in small groups to analyze a real-world problem and identify possible solutions.

     

    Prerequisites: FIN 5401  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Annually

  
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    FIN 5401 - Investments


    This course provides an introduction to investment theory and security valuation. In addition, students will gain a strong understanding of financial markets and the major categories of financial assets/ investments. The topics covered in the course include: risk and return, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, behavioral finance, limits to arbitrage, valuation of equities and bonds, option pricing models, and forward and futures markets. The lectures and examinations will focus both on quantitative and conceptual foundations.

     

     

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites for MSF students. Prerequisite for other students is FIN 4200  and is by permission only.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered Annually

  
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    FIN 5404 - Investment Fund


    The Investment Fund course offers an opportunity for students to team manage an equity portfolio on behalf of the Clark University Endowment. Students will be exposed to the institutional portfolio management process and stock selection under uncertain investment environment. Students are responsible researching investment ideas, formulate investment strategies, make investment decisions, evaluate portfolio performance, and ongoing monitoring of the Fund. Students are expected to conduct independent research in research teams and present their investment thesis to the class. Students must complete an application and be approved to take the course by the instructor prior to enrolling.

     

    Prerequisites: FIN 4200  for MBA students. 

      for MSF students. By permission only.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    FIN 5405 - Mergers and Acquisitions


    The M&A course is a case-based course which will investigate the advantages and pitfalls of corporate transactions and the process followed for successful deals. There will be a team project of the student’s choice to research and report on a recent transaction. Students should have completed the required finance courses before taking this course. As a result of taking this course, the student will better understand how deals materialize and create value for the shareholders, better understand the process followed in completing the transaction, will have negotiated an actual deal in class, and will appreciate the fact that once a transaction is signed, the hard work of making it successful will have just begun.

     

    Prerequisites: ACCT 4100  OR ACCT 4101  and FIN 4200 , OR

     .

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    FIN 5408 - Risk Management


    This course will provide an understanding and application of quantitative (Financial) and qualitative (Enterprise) methods of analyzing and managing risk within organizations.  Learn to apply multiple risk management tools to make high quality decisions for balancing corporate risk and reward tradeoffs.  Financial risk topics will include the examination of derivative application uses for hedging risk, measuring Value at Risk and exploring external impacts such as market, credit and systemic risks.  Enterprise risk topics will include constructing frameworks for managing strategic, operational and other business risks. Students will examine ways to assess and measure risk along with organizing corporate governance policies. 

    Prerequisites:  OR   

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    FIN 5409 - Wealth Management


    This course will focus on the philosophy and process of managing and investing institutional and high net worth individuals’ assets. It will review the process of identifying the investment objectives of investors and establishing their risk tolerance and investment horizon. The course will cover investment topics that include risk management, asset allocation, portfolio optimization, and different investment vehicles including the growing exchange-traded funds (ETF) securities. Investment theories covered will be tax efficient investing, life cycle of investing, sustainability investing, and selecting and monitoring investment managers. The quantitative material will draw heavily on college level algebra and other quantitative methods.

    This class fulfills the Experiential Learning Requirement in the MSF Program.

     

    Prerequisites: FIN 4200  OR FIN 5401  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    FIN 5417 - Financial Consulting Project


    The goal of this course to cultivate students’ capability to structure and present a rigorous analysis that supports a recommendation to make a capital investment. Across the sectors of the economy, investors must understand complex and evolving markets and regulations, available funding sources, and business models, to fully evaluate the risks and opportunities and make smart capital investment decisions. Student will learn the tools of corporate and project finance, capital budgeting and asset valuation, and risk analysis and work as interdisciplinary teams to propose, analyze, and defend a capital investment opportunity. The class project will be structured as a consulting engagement. By the end of the semester, students will understand how to model the capital structures commonly used to fund projects; apply the capital budgeting and risk analysis techniques that professionals use to make investment decisions; apply basic project management principles and tools to the completion of complex analysis; and present and defend a recommendation to make a capital investment.

    Counts as Experiential Learning Requirement II or an elective for the MSF and MBA programs.

    Prerequisites: FIN 4200   or FIN 5401  

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

  
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    FIN 5900 - Special Topics in Finance


    Each year, the Graduate School of Management offers courses under the “special topics” category. These courses are often different each semester and can be either .5 or one unit courses. For descriptions of current special topics courses, please see the Course Descriptions page on GSOM’s website.

     

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites vary depending on the course.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varies

  
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    FIN 5910 - Directed Research


    For a directed research course, a student and professor design a self-study course based around a common research interest shared by both. A directed research must be approved by the professor and the Associate Dean of GSOM. It can be designed as either a 0.5 unit or 1 unit course. The Directed Research Course Request Form should be completed and submitted to Associate Dean Andrea Aiello (aaiello@clarku.edu). For questions or additional information, contact your academic advisor. This directed research is done in the subject area of finance.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    FREN 103 - Elementary French: Intensive


    An accelerated elementary course, intended for students who have had no more than one year of French. Must also register for lab plus one discussion section.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Varied

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Culture for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 105 - Intermediate French I


    For students with 2 to 3 years of French. Consolidates basic skills for students who have completed FREN 102 or the equivalent. Emphasizes communicative proficiency: the development of oral and written skills, self-expression and cultural insight. There are weekly conversation groups with a French teaching assistant.

    Prerequisites: FREN 102 or FREN 103 or equivalent, or permission.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every semester

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 106 - Intermediate French II


    For students with 4 to 5 years of French. Builds on skills and knowledge gained at Intermediate I level. Continued emphasis on communicative proficiency: the development of oral and written skills through study of grammar, vocabulary, short texts. Greater emphasis on self-expression, interpersonal communication, cultural competency. There are weekly conversation groups with a native French speaker.

    Prerequisites: FREN 105  or equivalent, or permission.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every semester

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 120 - Ways of Writing, Ways of Speaking


    For students with 4 to 5 years of French or AP credit. This course is an introduction to advanced levels of French and exposes students to some of the areas of study they will find in the French program. It comprises the following sections: notions of culture and the everyday; poetry and song; news and the media; film and the graphic novel. The course seeks to develop students’ writing and speaking skills through assigned readings, discussion in class, and writing assignments targeting various styles and registers.
     






    Prerequisites: FREN 106   or equivalent, or permission.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 124 - Popular Culture in France


    For students with 4 to 5 years of French or AP credit. An exploration of the multiple manifestations and transformation of French popular culture, from the 1940s to today, as disseminated in film, music, the media, cartoons, bande dessinée and popular literature. Examines aspects of French culture such as youth culture, slang, sports, food and humor, and the common portrayal of topics such as family, love, foreigners and other social issues in the media. Conducted in French.
     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 131 - Readings in French Literature


    Introduces analysis and understanding of French literary texts and their visions of the world and of the self. Focuses on literary structures and conventions that form the basis of different genres through history. Readings include a wide range of complete texts in fiction, theater and poetry.

    Prerequisites: FREN 120  or FREN 124  above, or permission. Fulfills the Literature Requirement for Majors

     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 132 - Readings in Francophone Literature - Lecture/ Discussion


    Introduces analysis and understanding of francophone literature across the genres and their visions of the world and of the self. Readings include a wide range of complete texts from various genres, with an emphasis on works from French-speaking countries outside Europe. The focus of the course may vary from year to year. We may examine a theme encountered in literature across the francophone world, or study a variety of literary works from one specific region. Conducted in French.

     

    Prerequisites: FREN 120  FREN 124  or above, or permission. Fulfills the Literature Requirement for majors.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

  
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    FREN 137 - Studies in Contemporary French Culture


    Questions of cultural identity and cultural differences, with particular attention to France and foreigners, Franco-American (dis)connections and issues of immigration.

    Prerequisites: FREN 120   FREN 124  or above, or permission. Fulfills the Culture Requirement for majors.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 140 - Francophone Writing and Film


    Offering an overview of the French-speaking world that spans from South East Asia to the Caribbean, North and sub-Saharan Africa, and North America, this course celebrates the diversity of Francophone cultures through literature and film. It also seeks to examine and interrogate the ties of these former colonies with France and Belgium, the paths they have followed since independence, and their current socio-economic and political situation. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisites: FREN 120  FREN 124  or above, or permission. Fulfills the Culture Requirement for majors.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Bi-annually

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 145 - Translation Workshop


    Students work on various texts (advertising, journalism, theater, film scripts and fiction) exploring theory, techniques and problems of translation. Emphasizes translation from French into English and stresses lexical and syntactic aspects of comparative style. Students become acquainted with the variety of texts an American professional translator might expect to work on, including film subtitling.

    Prerequisites: FREN 120   FREN 124  or above, or permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 146 - Advanced Oral Expression - Lecture/Discussion


    This course is designed to help students improve their fluency in French. A variety of materials including films, newspaper articles, current events and literary texts will be used to help students perfect pronunciation and intonation, communicate opinions and engage in debate. Other topics may include phonetics, levels of discourse, public speaking, and dramatic interpretation.

    Prerequisites: One French course (FREN 131 or above)

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

  
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    FREN 164 - Haiti and the French Antilles


    This course examines the societies, cultures and literatures of Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique and French Guyana. It begins by tracing the history of the area, including the consequences of the French Revolution in Haiti and the rest of the Caribbean. The course then goes on to explore the cultures of the region, notably the cultural links with both ancestral Africa and France, the status of the Creole language, Haitian vodun, Haitian visual arts, and French Antillean carnival practices. The course also discusses topics such as gender relations, emigration and diaspora, Haiti’s political trajectory since independence, and the political status of the French Caribbean territories.

     

     

    Prerequisites: FREN 131 or above, or permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 210 - Spirited Rebellion: Adolescence French Novel and Film


    This seminar examines the gendered representation of adolescence through two media, literature and film.  We will examine youth as a social category, reading French novels and film against one another, exploring similarities and differences between the two genres in the creation of a cultural understanding of the changing place of youth in society.  Themes may include gender identity and gender roles, education, friendship, home and family, love and sexuality, and the transformation of narrative forms.

    Conducted in French.  Offered periodically. 

    Prerequisites: FREN 131 , FREN 136  or above, or permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 249 - The French-Speaking World In the 21st Century


    An interdisciplinary analysis of the effects of globalization in French-speaking countries around the world. Through literature, social texts, and fiction film and documentaries we explore such issues as the rise of religious extremism; the Algerian  civil war;  the problematic role of French language and culture in former French colonies decades after independence; the social, economic  and cultural consequences of globalization; the intersection between the local and the global; migration patterns from or within the francophone world; and other contemporary issues which the postcolonial francophone world is facing.
     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: LP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 256 - Education in 20th Century French Novel and Film.


    An exploration of literary and cinematic portrayals of youth with a focus on the role of the school and other sources of learning. Topics include gendered identity, social structures and narrative strategies. Authors may include Colette, Alain-Fournier, Gide, Sagan, Ernaux and Duras. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisites: FREN 131  or FREN 132  or permission.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 297 - Honors


    This honors program is for language, literature and culture majors only. By November 1 of the capstone semester, faculty will identify qualified senior majors (with a minimum GPA of 3.5) and invite them to submit a proposal for a semester-long honors thesis during the spring of their senior year. Other students who wish to take honors should identify an area of interest during the capstone semester, consult with the capstone professor and/or an appropriate honors adviser, and submit a proposal (by December 1) to the professor they would like to direct the project.*

    • Proposals will be approved at the discretion of the individual professor.
    • The Department Chair must also approve the project.
    • The honors candidate and adviser will decide on a work schedule, but a preliminary draft must be completed by the first week of April.
    • The final version is due one week before the last day of classes.
    • A second faculty reader will participate in the final evaluation of the honors project.
    • An honors project counts as one unit of credit.

    *Students graduating early and wishing to do an honors project should see their adviser during the fall of their junior year and get approval for the project from the thesis director and the department chair.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Annually

    Placement Guidelines
    Please visit the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for the language placement guidelines.

  
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    FREN 299 - Directed Study


    Undergraduates, typically juniors and seniors, construct an independent study course on a topic approved and directed by a faculty member. Offered for variable credit. May be repeatable for credit.

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Every Semester

  
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    GEOG 016 - Introduction to Economic Geography


    This course is built on the assumption that we live in a world whose societies, cultures, governments, and environmental relationships are most significantly shaped by the mechanisms and influences of global capitalism. A fuller understanding of the dynamics of the world economy requires that we not isolate them from the political, cultural, social, and ecological contexts through and within which they are situated. Deeper contextual understandings are what economic geographers seek to achieve and this course surveys these perspectives with a focus on the locations and distributions of economic activities and the flows, interconnections, and drivers of uneven development in the global economy. Fulfills the Global Comparison Perspective.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    GEOG 017 - Environment and Society


    Relationships between human societies and the natural environment are central to the discipline of geography. Geography 017 introduces students to these relationships and to the analysis of them, integrating perspectives from the natural and social sciences. We examine questions such as: how do environments shape societies; how do societies transform environments; are there environmental limits to economic growth; how does culture shape our relationships with our environments; and what sorts of human-environment relationships are sustainable and just? We examine these questions at many different geographic and temporal scales: from pre-history up to the present, from very local cases to the entire planet, and from pre-industrial or rural landscapes to suburban and urban ones. Cases and discussions will span the entire globe, but will include examples from the Americas, the United States, and New England in order to ground our discussions in the places we know best. One weekly discussion section. Fulfills the Global Comparison Perspective.

     

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: GP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    GEOG 020 - American Cities: Changing Spaces, Community Places


    This course examines the history and contemporary processes of urbanization, primarily in the North American context, with particular attention to the geography of these processes, which results in the differentiation of space and the creation of distinct places. The course covers a range of topics relevant to cities, including historical development, governance, social patterns, economics, planning, contemporary problems and the linkages among all of these. We examine the geography of urbanization at several scales, ranging from the development of the North American urban system to the experiences of neighborhoods within cities. A core course in Globalization, Cities and Development in the geography major. Fulfills the Historical Perspective (HP) requirement.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: HP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered every year

  
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    GEOG 022 - Why Global Warming Matters I


    Climate change (global warming)is the single greatest problem facing the planet today. Or is it? In this seminar students will peel away the rhetoric surrounding global climate change, so that they may be able to understand why this issue matters not only to international policy makers but also to individuals and their daily lives. Topics for exploration will focus on the causes and consequences of climate change and justification (and options) for action. The breadth of areas the climate-change issue intersects - including but not limited to politics, economy, ecology, epistemology, ethics - suggests that global warming is a crucial integrating theme for the discipline of geography and, more importantly, the intellectual foundation of a well-rounded student. Fulfills the Values Perspective (VP). Offered periodically as a first year seminar and as a lecture course.

    Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) Designation: VP

    Anticipated Terms Offered: Offered periodically

 

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